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Aspen Music Festival and School moves back to campus

After months of construction, the $70 million update to the Aspen Music Festival and School’s Bucksbaum Campus is nearly complete. Next week, staff will be returning to newly renovated administrative offices. Thirty six of 38 staff members will be moving back in. The other two are based at Harris Concert Hall.
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Barbara Platts / Aspen Public Radio

 

This morning’s delays should be no more than 20 minutes as crews set up head-to-head traffic lanes around the circle. The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) recommends drivers take a detour via Mclain Flats and Cemetery Lane, unless travelers need to get to Maroon Creek or Castle Creek roads.

If you visit the town of Marble this summer, tucked into the woods right off the main road, you'll notice a flurry of marble dust, the roar of power tools, and over 60 artists working on marble sculptures. This is the MARBLE/Marble Symposium and Joshua Weiner, a professional sculptor, has been actively involved for 23 years.

Weiner discusses the culture of the organization and the easygoing nature of the symposiums, and how his time spent with the symposium has transformed his own work. 

 The annual Aspen Police Department bike auction raised a record amount of money for the city.

Meet Gail Schwartz

May 22, 2016
Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Former Snowmass Village resident Gail Schwartz is the democratic candidate for Western Colorado’s Congressional District 3. Schwartz has formerly represented the region in the state senate and is coming out of retirement with her eye on incumbent Scott Tipton’s seat.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/

    Garfield County Libraries doesn’t have a new executive director just yet. Trustees with the Public Library District decided Wednesday to continue the search.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Bonedale Bike Week is a Carbondale tradition going back nearly a decade. This year it’s a little more under the radar than usual. But that doesn’t mean residents in Carbondale aren’t trying to keep the tradition going. There is a list of clandestinely organized events going on through the week.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

  The City of Aspen is awaiting applications for grant money that can go to art and community nonprofits.

 

For the last few years, around $750,000 have been given to groups like Aspen Film, Theatre Aspen and the Aspen Art Museum alongside other community organizations. Usually, a little more than half of that money goes to those community groups, while the other money goes towards the arts.

 

Residences at the Little Nell promotional photo

 The Aspen Skiing Company says it’s fixed a sewer problem at its upscale condos in Aspen.

Motorists should expect delays up to an hour at the Aspen Roundabout next Tuesday, May 24.

A harsh winter left the state-owned roundabout spotted with potholes. The Colorado Department of Transportation is responding to a request from the city of Aspen to resurface the road.

 

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Arts & Culture

Curated - May 23rd

This week on Curated, we speak with artist Sam Durant, author Dana Spiotta and we explore the Valley's cycling culture.
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Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.

State News

It will soon be legal for Coloradans to collect rain that falls from their roofs.

HELEN DOMBALIS / USED WITH PERMISSION

Despite widespread support from Democrats and Republicans as well as legislative leaders, two separate attempts to move Colorado back to a presidential primary have failed in the final days of the session.

Republicans in the Senate have defeated one of the Governor’s top priorities for the legislative session.

Oil and gas companies pay a tax to the state for the minerals they extract out of the ground. Colorado then gives some of that money back to local communities impacted by the drilling process. But a recent state Supreme Court ruling says companies have been overpaying these severance taxes – and now Colorado owes the industry tens of millions of dollars. Bente Birkeland has more.

For the full audio, click here.