Local

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Nowhere to go but up for Vaudeville Revue

The Glenwood Vaudeville Revue was founded in 2009. Almost seven years later, its founder is reflecting on what’s been done so far and ambitions for the coming years. Tonight is the Revue’s spring opening.
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Every summer since 2004, Ascendigo has brought children with autism to the Roaring Fork Valley to participate in an overnight sports camp. 

Valley Roundup 02-05-16

Feb 5, 2016

  Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason

 

Two candidates who sit on opposite sides of development are running for the mayor’s seat in Basalt. Unlike previous elections in that town, candidates’ positions are clearly different.

Differences abound among Basalt mayoral candidates Whitsitt and Stevens

 

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

Government leaders from the Roaring Fork Valley are meeting with top state officials in Glenwood Springs today to speak about the future of transportation in the region.

Naturalist talks in Carbondale get heated

Feb 4, 2016
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Naturalist Nights speaker series is put on by the Wilderness Workshop and the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies. This year’s series started with controversy when presentations on wolves and mountain lions at the Third Street Center in Carbondale turned contentious.

Basalt Community Design Center

  A couple of landscape architects hope to start a new way for talking about the Pan and Fork parcel in Basalt.

Elise Thatcher

  Local food organizers are tackling a burning question about the Carbondale Farmer’s market. They’re looking at whether there is a way to change the time or extend when it’s open.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Consultants are checking which parts of Pitkin County have the slowest internet connection.

Habitat for Humanity is building affordable housing in Basalt.

Gaffe allowed free parking at airport

Feb 4, 2016

  Thousands of people were able to park for free at the Aspen airport for nearly two months, and now the county is going after the company that’s responsible for the massive revenue loss. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

The Aspen/Pitkin County Airport is out almost $58,000 in revenue that was lost starting on Nov. 11. That was the day that an employee at Nebraska-based TSYS Merchant Solutions accidentally deleted the airport as a customer in its software system.

Roger Adams

  It’s been just under a week since Diana Sirko announced her amended plans to leave the Roaring Fork School District. Superintendent Sirko is now stepping down this summer instead of waiting until the end of June 2017.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

The Cooking School of Aspen is making a comeback. Local restaurateur Rob Ittner is rebuilding it and hopes to make the school a destination, more than a decade after it closed.

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CrossCurrents is Aspen Public Radio's locally-produced public/cultural affairs program.
Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.

State News

Colorado could be the next state to allow hunters to wear florescent pink. A Democratic proposal to give hunters the option of wearing pink – in addition to the traditional safety orange – has passed the Republican controlled Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources and Energy Committee.

"I hunt because it's a treasured time with my dad and my brothers," said Senator Kerry Donovan (D-Vail), a big game hunter and sponsor of Senate Bill 68 [.pdf]. "And the stories that happen in hunting camp are the stories that my family tell over and over again."

A bill to expand a state program to offer driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants in Colorado will be introduced at the state capitol later in February. The original law [.pdf], which Democrats passed when they controlled both chambers in 2013, allows undocumented immigrants who have lived in Colorado for at least two years and have paid taxes to get a license, if they pay an extra fee.

"I want to know when I'm driving that the people driving next to me know the same rules as I do. Especially when you come from a different country, road signs might look different," said Rep. Jonathan Singer (D-Longmont), sponsor of a new bill that would expand the program to 32 driver's license offices across the state.

"They deserve the opportunity to show that they are willing to be a part of our community, willing to play by the rules."

Gov. John Hickenlooper delivered his sixth State of the State address to the state Legislature Thursday. In his speech he highlighted the need for people from all political stripes to work together to fix the state's big budget problems and discussed Colorado's economic gains and challenges.

"We're one of the top states for economic growth," Hickenlooper said. "One of the best places for business and careers, for quality of life, for health and tourism."

The Colorado capitol had a back to school vibe Wednesday, with families and friends joining lawmakers in the chamber for the opening of Colorado's annual legislative session. The building hummed with activity — and the usual pomp and ceremony and opening day speeches — after the eight month interim. Isaac Slade, the lead singer of the Denver-based rock band The Fray, sang the national anthem in the Senate.

But it wasn't all fun, the first bills are introduced on opening day, and lawmakers begin to outline their priorities for the next four months.