Local

Meet Glenwood Springs' Ward 5 candidates

On April 4, Ward 5 in Glenwood Springs will elect a City Council member. Ward 5 is basically the first neighborhood you come to when you’re driving into Glenwood, from the west.

Read More
Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Reporter Two Way: Avalanche danger

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

PitCo plans for Emma historic site

"The @AP Twitter account, which was suspended after being hacked, has been secured and is back up. Thank you for your patience."

That's the word Wednesday morning from The Associated Press.

We all deserve a break from the past week's news. This NASA video could be just the right thing.

"Clashes broke out between protesters and riot police near France's lower house of parliament late on Tuesday just hours after the country legalized gay marriage, with opponents of the law hurling projectiles at police, who responded with tear gas," France 24 reports.

Even al-Qaida gloats about what's possible under U.S. gun laws. In June 2011, a senior al-Qaida operative, Adam Gadahn, released a video message rallying people to take advantage of opportunities those laws provide.

"America is absolutely awash with easily obtainable firearms," Gadahn says, explaining that "you can go down to a gun show at the local convention center" and buy a gun without a background check.

Then a faint smile crosses Gadahn's face. "So what are you waiting for?" he asks.

As Congress continues its debate over immigration reform, nearly a half-million young people who are in the U.S. illegally have already applied for deferred action.

The Obama administration started the policy, formally known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, last year for people who were brought into the U.S. illegally as children. Those who are approved gain the right to work or study and avoid deportation for two years.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Some of the media made mistakes during coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing. A sign of integrity is whether you correct them. A TV captioning service apologized for its mistake. Viewers in Dallas saw the bombing suspect misidentified. The screen read: "Marathon Bomber: He is 19-year-old Zooey Deschanel." For the record, the suspect is 19-year-old Chechen immigrant Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and not the star of the TV series "New Girl." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Apple Moves To Win Back Investor Confidence

Apr 24, 2013

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

How you like them apples? Apple is at the start of our business news.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

It was a yeoman's task but they would never put it that way in Washington State. The state just completed a six-year effort to rewrite its laws using gender-neutral language. Terms like fisherman and freshman were replaced by fisher and first-year student. Penmanship became handwriting. More than 3,000 sections of the law were revised but some words did not change. Manhole and man lock are words that survived; they just couldn't find a better way of saying them.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Here's another reminder that a fast-moving news story can completely change. Prosecutors have dropped the charges against Paul Kevin Curtis. He's the Elvis impersonator first arrested in the case of ricin being sent to U.S. officials, as we reported last week.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The massive swath of Boston that has been closed for more than a week is getting closer to reopening. City officials yesterday brought victims of the marathon bombings and their relatives in for a private visit and allowed neighborhood residents back home for the first time in over a week. Businesses also began the process of cleaning up and preparing to reopen.

The hardest-hit shops and restaurants remain boarded up. As NPR's Tovia Smith reports, others are hoping to reopen today or tomorrow.

Pages

CPB and APR

Getting to know your candidates

April 3-7

at Justice Snow's

Ways to listen to Aspen Public Radio

BBC Topline on Aspen Public Radio

Sign up!

The news you want to read

Sent to your inbox every Friday

State News

A proposal to get more money for Colorado’s aging and congested transportation system is on its legislative journey. The bipartisan bill, a top priority for legislative leaders and the governor, would send the question of a sales tax increase to voters and allow the state to borrow $3.5 billion for roads and infrastructure. The first committee hearing lasted about seven hours.  

New oil and gas drilling operations would have to be built further away from schools than they are now. That's according to a bill that advanced in the House on Wednesday. Democrats backed it after a seven-hour hearing in a packed room at the Capitol.

Self-driving vehicles could soon be tested in Colorado under a bill that passed in the state senate Wednesday. The measure would also make it illegal for local communities to ban the vehicles. 

A measure that would provide additional mental health training and support for police officers is moving through the state legislature.

Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.