APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

Guest host this week is Loren Jenkins.

This week ski season starts and there’s excitement around that, but there’s also excitement and concern, depending on whom you ask, about a developer buying up over a dozen buildings in Aspen. Meanwhile, Aspen city hall could be on the move soon. The state has taken its first shot at a unified water plan on diversions and other projects as Glenwood Springs continues to figure out how to mend fences over a new proposed bridge.

Artist James Surls’ sculpture “Sewing the Future” was installed in Carbondale Thursday. It took more than a hour to truck in different parts of the sculpture, stand them up and bolt them down in the middle of the Highway 133 roundabout. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

People began gathering around the roundabout early in the morning, when it was still chilly. Carbondale resident Noah Davis was bundled up and handing out doughnuts. He says he’s excited to see the sculpture go up.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Mother Nature delivered enough snow recently to crank up the lifts on Aspen Mountain...for an early opening.

Some athletes are already skiing and riding. A new training venue opened at Aspen Highlands.

The Carbondale and Rural Fire Protection District is hammering out how much money to spend next year as it’s running out of cash.

A new sculpture goes up in the middle of Carbondale’s roundabout this week. We talk to the artist.

jamessurls.com

On Thursday a 20 foot tall bronze and steel sculpture was installed in the middle of Carbondale’s new roundabout on Highway 133. The sculpture, called “Sewing the Future” was created by Carbondale resident and internationally recognized artist James Surls. I spoke with him about the sculpture earlier this week.

aspensciencecenter.org

Five applicants wanting to occupy space in the Old Power House building in Aspen will move onto the next round of review. Aspen City Council looked over recommendations Tuesday night from a committee charged with reviewing the proposals. The City-owned building used to house the Aspen Art Museum. 

The building’s attractive because of it’s location and potentially it’s price. The Aspen Art Museum paid $1 a year to occupy the space alongside the Roaring Fork River.

Pages