APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Marci Krivonen

Hundreds of disabled veterans are in Snowmass Village this week for the National Disabled Veterans Sports Clinic. The vets arrived in droves over the weekend at the Aspen airport. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Crystal Hughes stands on the tarmac at the Aspen airport. She’s wearing military fatigues.

Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District

The fire department for Carbondale, and a wide swath of the surrounding area, is holding public meetings in the coming weeks. The meetings are part of a Master Plan for the Carbondale & Rural  Fire Protection District. It’s been struggling since losing more than half of its budget in recent years.

aspenpowerplant.com

Negotiations begin this week over the lease for Aspen’s Old Power House. The Aspen Brewing Company and local TV station Aspen 82 won a competitive bid to move into the space, located off Mill Street. The proposal also has incubator space for new businesses. The City of Aspen owns the building, and because the new tenants include private companies, they are likely to pay more than the previous rent of $1 a year.

Bureau of Land Management, White River Office

The Bureau of Land Management has released its proposed changes to an oil and gas management plan that would affect part of northern Garfield County. The BLM’s amendment to the White River Field Office Resource Management Plan aims to reduce the impact of increased oil and gas production. That would be for an area spanning 1.7 million acres. Besides Garfield County, the area includes parts of Rio Blanco and Moffat Counties. 

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The Obama administration is requiring oil and gas companies to disclose what’s in their fracking fluid. How is that going to shake out in Garfield County?

Did a town hall meeting hosted by this station on the controversial and confusing charter amendment known as “Keep Aspen Aspen” shed light on the issue enough that voters are convinced one way or the other?

Meanwhile, down in Carbondale a woman who used to co-own a NBA basketball team is suing the IRS for $21 million.

Creative Commons/Flickr/photosteve101

Residents frustrated with slow internet speeds in Old Snowmass showed up to a Pitkin County Commissioner’s meeting Wednesday. 

Katie Murch is co-director at the Aspen Camp of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Old Snowmass. Through an interpreter, she told commissioners slow internet makes the organization look unprofessional. An online service that video streams her signing barely works.

Intepreter Kyle Larson: "Because of the internet service it’s blurry, it freezes. A one minute conversation can take ten minutes because of the internet service and it looks bad."

Kathy Williams

Today we wrap up our series profiling the candidates running in contested races for Glenwood Springs City Council. Kathy Williams is running for an at-large seat. Her big issue is the heavy traffic moving through downtown. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Kathy Williams has had a difficult life. In the 30 years she’s lived in Glenwood she’s dealt with cancer and divorce. She’s held a variety of jobs and currently works at a drugstore downtown. With her life experience, she says she brings a unique perspective to local politics.

The science of sports will be front and center during a new event in the Upper Valley this weekend. The Aspen Club is hosting the Aspen Sports Summit. It’s designed for a wide audience, from professionals to concerned parents.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Residents in the Mid-Valley saw federal agents in tactical gear this week. We’ll tell you why.

A police officer involved in a controversial arrest of an Aspen teenager says he’s leaving the department.

Proponents and opponents of a ballot measure to change Aspen’s land use code sound off at a town hall meeting.

A beloved restaurant in Aspen will keep its doors open longer than expected.

And, a popular Aspen bike-sharing program wants to expand its reach.

Elise Thatcher

Little Annie’s lives again. Aspen’s long suffering affordable eatery was supposed to close next week. But it turns out Little Annie’s can stay open. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has the story.

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