APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County’s Healthy Rivers Board handed out thousands of dollars in grants Thursday, including one project that has high schoolers keeping a 24-hour watch on wildlife.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

 

A Glenwood Springs arts nonprofit is being investigated after its executive director resigned.

Glenwood Springs police investigate Center for the Arts finances

Ex-art center boss Brusig faces felony over $18K of bad checks

Colorado Department of Transportation

Finding ways to fund transportation projects in the state was a top priority for lawmakers this session. But as Bente Birkeland reports, an effort to send a ballot question to voters this fall is all but dead.

Even with the backing of the Republican Senate President Kevin Grantham and transportation committee chair Randy Baumgartner the bill always faced an uphill hurdle in the GOP controlled Senate. It cleared its first committee, and heads to the finance committee on Tuesday, where three Republicans are expected to defeat it.

A local arts nonprofit is in a bit of turmoil with the resignation of its executive director and now, there’s a police investigation. Speaking with News Director Carolyn Sackariason this morning on Valley Roundup is Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent.

You can hear more of the conversation, which includes Aspen Times reporter Scott Condon and Managing Editor Rick Carroll with Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News at 3:30 p.m. today.

 

courtesy of www.gardner.senate.gov

Senator Cory Gardner is scheduled to be in Glenwood Springs tonight at a fundraiser for Garfield County Republicans. Local activists plan to be there, too.

Aspen Public Radio

The Glenwood Springs City Council swore in its newest members last night.

Aspen Public Radio

Shelley Kaup won as the city’s at-large candidate in the April 4 election. Jonathan Godes was elected to represent Ward 5. Rick Voorhees ran unopposed and will represent Ward 2.

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Wyatt Orme and Claire Woodcock present a compilation of the week's news. 

This is Aspen Public Radio. I’m Christin Kay. Aspenites are deciding now and in coming weeks who to elect as mayor and who fills two council seats. There’s been a few public debates and the candidates are starting to show their colors. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason moderated two debates and has attended others.

 

Aspen Public Radio

Glenwood Springs Hostel serves as a cheap, comfortable home base for people visiting to raft and ski. It draws on another clientele, however: People down on their luck.

courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy

In this politically charged year, environmentalists from across the country are planning for Earth Day marches and other activities to show support for science on Saturday, April 22.

The Carbondale Board of Trustees heard from We-Cycle Tuesday night in a discussion about mobility.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

It’s mid-April, with mild temperatures and sunshine on the snow-capped peaks above Avalanche Creek. The grasses and shrubs along the valley floor are still golden brown, inching toward green. It won’t rain today but there’s a front moving in tomorrow, and it’s windy. All of this means the variables are coming together for fire.

After four years in office, Aspen City Councilman Art Daily who is running for another term, is finally receiving emails that are being delivered to his government account.

On Monday, the city of Aspen’s IT department began forwarding Daily’s emails to his private business account at the law firm, Holland & Hart, LLP The move is in response to the revelation that Daily has never looked at his City of Aspen email account.

Garfield County’s Board of Commissioners agreed Monday to pay Xcel Energy just under $325,000 to power up one of their new radio towers.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Garfield County commissioners voted Monday to rezone part of a residential neighborhood in Battlement Mesa to allow for an injection well.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

City of Aspen voters will elect a mayor and two council seats next month. Some locals are pushing for new blood on council, largely because of the current council’s vote to hold on to water rights to build dams on Castle and Maroon creeks. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following the issue and is here to give us an update.

Spring Board Aspen teaches their members how to actually be on a board, be philanthropic and encourages future involvement with other non-profits. Board members frequently come together to decide on Aspen Spring Board's evolving and current mission. 

Aspen’s elected officials are considering two proposed laws that combat tobacco use. One of them would prohibit the sale of all tobacco products to individuals under the age of 21. Right now, you only have to be 18 to buy tobacco in Colorado.

The matter was originally brought forward by Dr. Kim Levin, Pitkin County’s medical officer, and representatives of the Preventing Tobacco Addiction Foundation. It’s part of an initiative called “Tobacco 21”.

The second ordinance sets out a licensing program for businesses that sell e-cigarettes.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

  Alicia Thompson, Jeff Glasser and Wade Spann share their stories of service and sacrifice with reporter Alycin Bektesh.

Pages