APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Ken Krehbiel via Facebook

Three mountain lion kittens that had been hanging out on the Rio Grande Trail near Carbondale have moved on - in one way or another.

 

Courtesy of Anna Zane

 Local tavern owner and Pitkin County republican Anna Zane is a delegate’s guest at the Republican National Convention this week. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Barbara Platts about her experience so far.

 

City of Apsen

After nearly five hours of deliberation Tuesday night, Aspen City Council couldn’t come to a consensus on whether to build a new $31 million City Hall.

Council was given a few different options on how to house all of the city’s departments. Council members Ann Mullins and Art Daily want the “Galena” option. That would put all city services in one 52,000-square-foot building across from Rio Grande Park.

Aspen Public Radio

Those who live near proposed oil and gas wells were given a unique opportunity yesterday to voice their concerns directly to the state agency that oversees the industry.

Local kid doubles his sales for the Ducky Derby

Jul 18, 2016
Carolyn Sackariason|Aspen Public Radio

An 11-year-old skier has been stationed in front of an Aspen grocery store nine hours a day for the past several weeks so he can sell enough plastic ducks to continue his skiing endeavors.

 

A long-standing local judge is stepping down from the bench.

 

Ninth Judicial District Court Judge Daniel Petre is retiring. He ascended the bench in 2004, overseeing criminal and civil cases in Pitkin, Garfield and Rio Blanco counties.

According to judicial performance evaluations, his peers have in the past ranked Petre favorably in judicial demeanor — describing him as fair, compassionate and thorough.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County residents will likely be asked to continue taxing themselves to pay for open space and trails for another twenty years.

The Open Space and Trails Board plans to ask voters in November to extend a mill levy that provides about $10 million of funding a year. Allocation of that money would change slightly to allow for more spending on maintenance and stewardship of current Open Space and Trails properties.

 

Amy Gray is a 5th grade teacher at Aspen Middle School. Every month, her class is visited by a special guest, Adelaide Waters, a volunteer storyteller for Spellbinders. Waters has a new story to tell the students every month, and as Gray explains, the students are captured by each and every story. 

Gray shares the importance of oral storytelling for her students and the value the program brings to her classroom. Spellbinders Executive Director, Catherine Scales Johnson also contributes. 

State oil and gas hearings held in Glenwood Springs

Jul 17, 2016
Elise Thatcher

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission will hold hearings in Glenwood Springs on Tuesday, which gives the public a chance to comment on development proposals in Battlement Mesa.

 

The meeting offers a chance for citizens to share their thoughts with the state regulating commission, known as the COGCC, about several proposed well pads in Battlement Mesa.

 

Aspen Public Radio

The Aspen High School is once again looking for an assistant principal.

 

 

Grant Safranek accepted the job in May. But last week, he rescinded without giving a reason.

Principal Tharyn Mulberry said it was not an acrimonious departure. The job opening was posted internally and as of Friday, four candidates had applied. They happen to be the same ones who applied for the job this past spring when Safranek was picked.

Whoever fills the position will be on one-year trial basis.

Ken Krehbiel via Facebook

Bear activity closed campgrounds, a moose charged a woman and her dog, and three mountain lion kittens were spotted along the Rio Grande trail — all in one day earlier this summer. Perry Will, area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), said days like this are becoming the new norm.

Madeleine Osberger/Aspen Daily News

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

The Aspen affordable housing program is in a mid-life crisis of sorts. How to manage nearly 3,000 subsidized units is weighing on public officials.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Barbara Platts present a compilation of the week’s news.

Madeleine Osberger/Aspen Daily News

  The unveiling of what’s now being called the “Basalt River Park” by a citizen’s committee earlier this week has turned some heads and raised some eyebrows. At $8 million dollars, elected officials and fiscal conservatives are wondering whether it’s worth it. Joining news director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone, columnist for the Aspen Times.

Last day for public input on biodiversity policy

Jul 14, 2016
Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

The public comment period for Open Space and Trails’ new biodiversity policy closes today after two extensions.

 

The draft policy sets biodiversity - not recreation - as the top priority in making decisions about Open Space and Trails’ properties.

Aspen Pitkin County Jail held an open house yesterday to showcase the facility’s latest renovations. Signs were hung around the jail for visitors to help give them an idea of what each room was. There was the nurse’s office, inmate’s cells, day rooms, gym and even a pat search area in the entry garage.

 

Courtesy of White River National Forest

Campers in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness will need to store all food and garbage in bear-resistant containers for the next five years.

This week on Cross Currents, Amanda Boxtel and Malibu Kelly Hayes talk about the Bridging Bionics Program.

Traffic counters parked for local projects

Jul 12, 2016
Aspen Public Radio News

Two traffic counts for separate government projects have been measuring activity in and out of Aspen at peak drive times to gather data for local management plans.

Troy Tyler sits in the back of his pickup at the intersection at 8th and Smuggler in the West End, watching the long line of cars and trucks headed out of town. He pushes a button on handheld machine indicating the behavior of each car, biker, or pedestrian, and he does this hundreds of times over two hours.

Bustang, the state’s first-ever inter-regional bus service, is celebrating its one-year anniversary today. And its popularity has exceeded expectations.

Operated by the Colorado Department of Transportation, Bustang has exceeded ridership predictions by 15,000 passengers. And revenue projections by 36 percent.

Bustang offers three major service routes: between Fort Collins and Denver, Colorado Springs and Denver, and Glenwood Springs and Denver. And last month, Bustang welcomed its 100,000th passenger.

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