APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Elizabeth Gibson, Special to PennLive.com

After five months, Glenwood Springs has a new city manager. City Council made the decision on Monday.

The MARBLE/Marble Symposium is a series of three week long sessions where sculptors of all ages and abilities come to the town of Marble to carve. Founder Madeline Weiner and Sculptor Dawn Record discuss the symposium, participants, and power of carving marble stone. 

Registration is now open for summer symposiums and tours are available for visitors. More information at www.MarbleInst.org

City of Aspen

  Pitkin County is asking for over 21,000 square feet of new development along with renovation of the Courthouse Plaza building.

Elise Thatcher

Water managers have formally decided to allow another release from Ruedi Reservoir in the coming months.

 Welcome to Valley Roundup.

This week on Cross Currents is from the archives with NPR Foreign Correspondent Mike Shuster from the Given Institute on Iran, China, North Korea, and Syria. 

  On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Elise Thatcher present a compilation of the week’s news.

  A city of Aspen employee was able to bypass the affordable housing lottery system by claiming a medical hardship, jumping ahead of dozens of other locals who would have competed for the house in a subdivision on the east end of town. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup today are Aspen Times columnist Roger Marolt and Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News.

courtesy Colorado Department of Transportation

 Fatal accidents are down in both Pitkin and Garfield counties, according to the five-year data released by CDOT. However, the Roaring Fork Valley sees more average yearly fatalities per capita than Colorado as a whole.

Flikr user Jim Leach

  Health insurance is especially pricey in the Roaring Fork Valley. Now Gov. John Hickenlooper is expected to approve a study looking at making the cost of insurance more equitable across the state.

The permanent rockfall mitigation project in Glenwood Canyon will cause 30-minute delays for traffic in both directions May 10, 11 and 12, according to the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT).

This project, which is classified as an emergency, comes after the February rock slide when the canyon was closed for several days. CDOT anticipates finishing the project by Sept. 1.

Beginning May 10, women in the valley have an opportunity to learn about the basics of finance. Financial planner Danielle Howard, in partnership with domestic violence support organization RESPONSE, offers the four-week course to help women learn about saving, giving and budgeting on their own.

Two local leaders have joined a national push for increased methane regulation in the oil and gas industry.

A letter sent to President Barack Obama and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator  Gina McCarthy last week has the support of 70 elected officials nationwide, including outgoing Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot and Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron.

Marci Krivonen

Oil and gas organizers hope to put two oil and gas-related questions on the fall ballot. A handful of local activists are part of the effort, which is receiving more attention after a recent state supreme court decision.

 

The popular trail that leads to Hanging Lake in the Glenwood Canyon will be closed one or two days in May, June and September while the Eagle-Holy Cross Ranger District does maintenance aimed at protecting habitats along the trail. The dates the trail will be closed are May 25-26, June 13-14 and Sept. 10.

 

Maintenance for the trail includes moving large rocks, painting bridges, removing graffiti, adding new rock steps and creating a barrier system for protecting habitats.

Dr. Mindy Nagle and ER physician Greg Balko won seats on the Aspen Valley Hospital Board of Directors yesterday.

Leticia Ingram

Leticia Ingram is having a huge week. The Basalt teacher was honored by President Barack Obama on Tuesday, with other celebrated teachers from across the country.

Spotlight Health 2016, Episode 1

May 3, 2016

  This is the first episode in our spring series on critical health issues. In this program we’ll talk with researcher Vic Strecher about the boost you could get if you have a specific purpose in life. One example? People with a purpose are “2.4 times less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease 7 years later,” according to Strecher.

Elise Thatcher

The town of Basalt is taking a resident to court because she filed a request to see correspondence between the mayor and the town’s top election official.

Details are emerging about lease negotiations between the city of Aspen and the group that is planning to take over the old art museum along the banks of the Roaring Fork River.

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