APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Paticipatory Democracy

Oct 28, 2014
Roger Adams

Earlier this month, Aspen City Council scrapped a controversial lodging incentive ordinance.  Now, at a series of public input sessions, the city is gathering survey responses on the issues contained in the ordinance.   Three more sessions are set for tomorrow (Wednesday 10-29-2014) and the survey will then be available online.

It is an exercise in participatory democracy.

APR's Roger Adams attended a session and filed this report.

Marci Krivonen

A laboratory that tests retail marijuana is opening in Carbondale. It’s one of just two such Colorado labs west of the Continental Divide. The scientists who run GreenHill Laboratories say they will be testing for potency and they’ll be one of the first to test for contaminants. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Inside Greenhill Laboratories in Carbondale, Lab Owner Hilary Glass motions toward her equipment.

Glass: "These are my incubators. I need about eight more."

Kristin Werner is a somatic psychotherapist and facilitates the English-speaking support groups for RESPONSE. Werner explains how she works with victims and survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. Executive Director Logan Hood also discusses a new technique called Advocate Initiator Response, where RESPONSE advocates go immediately to victims, rather than waiting for victims to come to them.

aspencore.org

The non profit the Community Office of Resource Efficiency is celebrating twenty years in the Valley this month. Citizens, local governments and utility companies partnered in 1994, to reduce energy consumption locally. CORE’s work so far has taken a significant amount of carbon out of the atmosphere. 

Cindy Bartell

The director of a new non profit in Glenwood Springs says her family inspired her to start the program for people with special needs. Project Radius promises to provide social and therapeutic recreational opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Cindy Bartell who founded the organization earlier this year.

Valley Roundup - October 24th, 2014

Oct 24, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week - Development is booming up and down the valley. A new hot springs in Glenwood Springs, a new hotel in Basalt and a big new bus depot in Aspen are just some of the upcoming projects. 

There is a demonstrated need for more psychiatric care in the Valley.  Officials say too many drunks and people with mental health problems wind up in jail or the ER.

Also this week newspaper endorsements and their effect on voters.

And, remembering Willard Clapper.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

A memorial service is planned for a long-time Aspen firefighter and teacher.

And the applications are in for who wants to rent the old power house building in Aspen...that used to house the Aspen Art Museum.

Aspen area voters will see a tax question their ballots asking for money to fund ambulance service.

Meanwhile, downvalley voters will choose between a Garfield County commissioner and a candidate with some very different viewpoints.

Part 1 of a talk from this past summer with an American Enterprise Institute scholar Karlyn Bowman on the election.

Marci Krivonen

In one of the only contested Garfield County races, two candidates with different viewpoints are running for county commissioner. Incumbent republican Tom Jankovsky is seeking a second four-year term. He’s being challenged by Michael Sullivan, a democrat, who says he’d represent a voice that’s going unheard. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

District One in Garfield County covers Carbondale and parts of Glenwood Springs. Candidate Michael Sullivan says he typifies the values and concerns in this area.

Elise Thatcher

If someone has a heart attack-- or breaks a leg-- in the Aspen area, there’s a small fleet of ambulances ready to pick them up. Even if the  person is up a dirt road near Independence Pass or on top of Aspen Mountain. But there’s a key part of that access that’s becoming a big problem. And the ambulance district is asking for a half million dollar budget increase to pay for it.

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