APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Aspen Skiing Company

Before the chairlifts start turning, the Aspen Skiing Company is providing a glimpse of how the upcoming season is shaping up. Company executives talked about the business outlook and efforts to combat climate change during a presentation to the Pitkin County commissioners Tuesday (10/20). Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen Skiing Company President and CEO Mike Kaplan began the hour-long presentation with a weather forecast.

Blair Weyer/Aspen Police Department

Local law enforcement agencies are hoping to simplify the process of getting help to victims of domestic violence. On Tuesday (10/20) Aspen, Snowmass and Basalt police joined the Pitkin County Sheriff’s Office in creating the Valley’s first Advocate Initiated Response referral system.

Air quality in GarCo improves

Oct 20, 2015

Residents in Garfield County can breathe easier now that a recently released study shows air quality is improving. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has more.

Garfield County commissioners yesterday received results from a human health risk assessment of air quality. It shows a decreasing potential for cancer risk over the years 2008 to 2012.


That’s when data was collected by the state department of health at different air monitoring sites throughout the county, which is heavily active with oil and gas drilling.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

Transit App is in a trial phase right now, working on connecting bike share systems with other forms of public transportation.

Facebook/Roaring Fork Conservancy

Water officials are presenting a final Roaring Fork Regional Water Efficiency Plan this week. The Pitkin County commissioners will hear how water can be conserved ahead of increased demand.

Work on the water efficiency plan began in 2012, when the Roaring Fork Valley was experiencing drought. Major water providers from Aspen to Glenwood Springs joined an effort to plan for a drier future.

Aspen council may change policy on conflicts of interest

Oct 19, 2015
Marci Krivonen / Aspen Public Radio

   The mayor of Aspen is considering asking his colleagues to tweak a city rule that would minimize conflicts of interest among elected officials.

Right now, the city’s rules around ethics only address employees. They’re not allowed under law to work for anyone in the private sector for six months after leaving their job if the move puts them in a situation where they do or appear to have a conflict of interest.

Poet Cam Scott moved to the Roaring Fork Valley eight years ago. He writes a poem every day, and has been doing so for decades. He said that his first order of business after moving was to find a local poetry group. He found that in the Aspen Poets' Society.

Scott discusses the evolving poetry movement on Colorado's Western Slope and how poetry has helped shaped his life. Kim Nuzzo, co-founder and president of the Aspen Poets' Soceity, also contributes. 

courtesy photo / Garfield County Library

The Rifle library was chosen as one of eight libraries statewide to participate in a pilot backpack check-out program.

City of Aspen

A pedestrian bridge over Castle Creek Road near Aspen was damaged this summer. Now it’s getting fixed, which means the road will be closed to traffic later this month. 

On June 18th an oversized construction vehicle clipped the the bridge on its way up Castle Creek Road. The wooden bridge connects two open spaces. The truck ripped off part of the support structure on the bridge’s underside. Matt Kuhn is the City of Aspen Trails Manager.

Valley Roundup - October 16, 2015

Oct 16, 2015

  Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason

Joining me are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent and Jill Beathard, editor of the Snowmass Sun.

Strong feelings about immigration and the local Latino population continue to be vocalized on the opinion pages of the Glenwood Post Independent.