APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Valley Roundup - September 27th, 2013

Sep 27, 2013

President Barack Obama made an announcement today about the battle in Congress.

One of the first deadlines for so called retail marijuana is fast approaching. By next Tuesday, October 1st, local communities are supposed to decide if they’re going to allow the pot to be grown, sold, and otherwise available in the community in the coming year.

“It’s pretty much going to be clustered in just a handful of areas. Denver and Boulder I think are the big cities, and then there’s mountain communities as well.”

John Ingold is a reporter for the Denver Post.  He’s keeping an eye on how the state is getting ready for retail marijuana and says even pot-friend places like Denver questions remain.

“There is concern about advertising, distances from schools, zoning, those kinds of things.”

Aspen Public Radio takes a look at a unique documentary showing at the Aspen Filmfest. It takes viewers inside one of the nation’s busiest emergency rooms where patients often wait hours for care.

And on the Download this week, we explore glitches with new iPhones, brainwashing kids to pay for movies & music and other unusual ventures in education.

Mountain Edition - September 26th, 2013

Sep 27, 2013

Heavy flooding on the Front Range has resulted in a mess. Oil and animal excrement from feedlots have spilled into or near rivers. The flooding put dams on the Front Range to the test as walls of water rushed down canyons and into towns. We’ll talk to the chief of dam safety for the state. The Roaring Fork Valley deals with suicide often more than other Colorado communities. One local non profit is trying to change that. Federal health care reform kicks into high gear next week when people can shop online for insurance. But, even with insurance, some patients struggle to get care. And, every month a Ute Indian spiritual leader leads a sweat in a cavern in Glenwood Springs. We’ll take you to the healing ceremony. And finally, we’ll introduce you to a local winter Olympic hopeful who learned to ride horses before she got on skis.

codeblackmovie.com

A documentary film featured in this year’s Aspen Filmfest uses a chaotic emergency room to highlight the country's overloaded health care system. Code Black follows a group of young, idealistic E.R. residents who work in what seasoned doctor’s call “C-Booth” at Los Angeles County hospital. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with Ryan McGarry, an E.R. doctor and the director of the film.

Marci Krivonen

A member of the Ute Indian Tribe is holding traditional sweats in Glenwood Springs in an effort to keep his culture alive. Each month, Kenny Frost takes a small group into the depths of a cave warmed by natural hot springs. The cave is where his ancestors came to heal. And, he hopes his sweats bring back to life a culture that’s losing its traditions quickly. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen Hope Center

Suicide is a real problem in the Roaring Fork Valley… this year nine people have died by suicide, normally a year’s total. Statewide, more than a thousand people died by suicide in 2012. An Aspen organization is trying to tackle the problem in the Roaring Fork Valley. One of their methods is training locals to act when friends or family might be at risk…. The Hope Center held a training in Aspen on Tuesday, September 24th.

Sandy Iglehart: “So tonight you’re gonna learn how to possibly help someone that’s in crisis.”

Creative Commons/Flickr/The National Guard

The Affordable Care Act continues to roll out with the opening of something called a marketplace next week. That’s where people can shop for health insurance. Health care reform also expands Medicaid - the government-subsidized health plan for low-income people. Currently, many doctors in the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond don’t accept Medicaid patients because the plan gives providers a dismal reimbursement. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, some doctors say the issue highlights a fundamental problem with the health care system.

Buildearth.org

Officials are also reviewing dams along the Front Range. The state agency in charge of dam safety says all of the high risk ones did well during recent flooding -- those are dams where a lot of people could get hurt if they fail. But several smaller dams weren’t able to handle the record amount of rain. Bill McCormick oversees dam safety for Colorado. He says this could end up affecting how dams on the Western Slope are managed.

U.S. Ski Team

The Road to Sochi is a look at the ten athletes from the Aspen area who are training with the hopes of making it onto the 2014 Winter Olympic team.

Aspen School Board Takes Neutral Stance on Amendment 66

Sep 24, 2013
Creative Commons/Flickr/Editor B

The Aspen School Board yesterday, decided against taking a formal stance on Amendment 66. It's a school finance reform measure voters will see on the November ballot.

Sarah Johnson/Roaring Fork Conservancy

The beginning of this week has brought an unusual amount of moisture to the Roaring Fork Valley. Mountains were dusted with snow and rains lifted river levels to flows usually seen in the Spring. Sarah Johnson with the Roaring Fork Conservancy says flows on rivers like the Crystal are dramatically higher than they were this time last year. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with her on Monday.

Valley Roundup - September 20th, 2013

Sep 20, 2013

The flood waters are now moving east into Kansas and Nebraska. Better weather is allowing hard hit mountain communities like Boulder to dry out. This was a singular massive rain event. How it happened seems pretty clear. How and what it means long term, less so. Brent Gardner-Smith and Bob Ward of Aspen Journalism join us this week to talk about all the water, Colorado’s on going drought and climate change.

Also, this fall, voters will decide the fate of a new funding model for public schools – Mick Ireland shares his take.

And on The Download – how hackers might be able to steal your fingerprints.

Mountain Edition - September 19th, 2013

Sep 19, 2013

Floodwaters in the Front Range are receding and the number of missing people is going down. Residents of flood-ravaged towns are returning home. We’ll bring you an update on the floods and let you know how you can help. Some from the Roaring Fork Valley have been helping Front Range residents get back on their feet and seeing just how devastating flooding can be. The state’s climatologist says what’s strange about last week’s weather is its pattern. Simultaneous, powerful rain storms hit multiple Front Range areas at one time. Also today, men are still making more money than women in Colorado – we’ll break down the numbers, county by county. And finally, imagine flying 80 miles an hour down Aspen Mountain on skis. One Aspen ski racer could be an international champion, if she can land a spot with the Olympic team.

The History of KAJX - Part 2

Interviews with Sy Coleman, Michael Stranahan and Andrea Young.

Creative Commons/Flickr/eflon

Men are making more money than women working in the Roaring Fork Valley. But, the differences vary depending on the county. A new report shows a woman earns 80-cents for every dollar a man makes in Colorado. 

In Pitkin County, on average, a man earns $54,000 a year compared to $47,000 for a woman. In Garfield County, the disparity is greater. A man earns $50,000 annually, compared to a woman’s earnings of $37,000.

teamavsc.org

Ten athletes from the Aspen area are training to compete in the 2014 Winter Olympics, which start in early February. Only a handful of them will make it. Over the next several weeks, we’ll follow these athletes as they work hard to make the cut.

Valley Roundup - September 13th, 2013

Sep 13, 2013

Welcome to Valley Roundup for September 13. 2013, a review of the week’s top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond.

The water keeps coming along the front range in what some are calling floods of biblical proportions.  Three are known dead and thousands are evacuated from Ft Collins to Colorado Springs.  We gather up the latest from the flood affected areas.

In the valley this week it was the bus system that led the news as the new rapid transit system is almost two weeks old.  There has been some grumbling.

Two Democratic state Senators were thrown out in recall elections this week.  It could spell trouble for the party in next year’s legislative races.

Wealth inequality is growing and Mick’s has a take   

And on the Download this week…the sounds of deep space

Mountain Edition - September 12th, 2013

Sep 12, 2013

Many Coloradans on the Front Range have moved to higher ground, they’re working to stay safe in the middle of dangerous floods. Three people have died, and some communities are evacuating. One is Jamestown, northwest of Boulder. But there are major complications.

In other news, there’s been a few notable meth-related incidents in Rifle in this week...We’ll talk to the police chief there. And, Pitkin County is one of the last counties in Colorado figure out early plans for so-called “retail” marijuana.

Plus, when it comes to tiffs over real estate, a dispute in downtown Aspen is very unusual.

Law Enforcement: Meth is a Significant Problem in Rifle

Sep 12, 2013
tridentnarc.com

Methamphetamine has made headlines in Garfield County recently. On Monday, law enforcement officials announced they collected 117 grams of meth in the Rifle area. The drug enforcement team TRIDENT made eight arrests in the drug bust. Also, authorities announced this week a meth overdose was to blame for a mysterious death. Rifle resident Anthony Green fell over dead around midnight on August 22 on a downtown street.

Elise Thatcher

Colorado is the first state to finalize the details on how to regulate recreational marijuana. The rules came out Monday, September 9th.  Here in the Roaring Fork Valley, the Pitkin County Commission is taking some early steps for figuring out how to work out recreational… or so-called “retail”... marijuana. They met yesterday, Tuesday September 10th, to explore what comes first.

scheibersport.com

We're following Roaring Fork Valley athletes training for the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia next February for a series we're calling The Road to Sochi.  Over the next few months we’ll Introduce you to home-grown athletes and what it takes to be at the top of their sport.

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