APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain talks with journalist Lesley Stahl about what’s wrong with the Obama National Security Strategy. U.S. Senator McCain, along with other leaders on the United State’s Homeland Security front, spoke during the four-day Aspen Security Forum held at the Aspen Institute.

Renee Solari is the Program Manager for Education Services at SunPower, a solar company that designs and manufactures high-efficiency photovoltaic cells and solar panels out of California. The company has a mission to provide tools and promote education to students around the country. Energetics Education, based in Carbondale, is a recipient of donated solar panels from SunPower. These panels are used by high school students in the Roaring Fork Valley to design and build solar-powered cars, or Solar Rollers. 

Elise Thatcher

  Aspen’s High School has a new principal.  45-year-old Tharyn Mulberry has been described as dramatically improving academics at the Pueblo high school where he’s principal now. Mulberry says he’s inspired to continue the already high achievement in Aspen.

Elise Thatcher

  Starting today, there’s roadwork on Highway 82, either on Main Street in Aspen or between the roundabout and the airport. It’s a paving project during Aspen’s busiest month for car traffic at the entrance to the resort community. This July there’s an average of 27,000 cars coming in or out of town each day

Creative Commons/Flickr/Medill DC

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain spoke in Aspen Saturday. The republican discussed the Iran deal, cyber attacks, Donald Trump and ISIS. 

McCain’s talk was part of the Aspen Security Forum. In fighting the Islamic terror group ISIS, he says the U.S. has no direct strategy.

Valley Roundup - July 24th, 2015

Jul 24, 2015

Our survey of the week’s top stories, bringing together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news. Valley Roundup goes beyond the headlines with reporters and editors discussing issues important to the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Mountain Fair set to open 44th annual event

Jul 24, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amy Kimberly, the executive director of the Carbondale Council for the Arts and Humanities says that she expects somewhere between fifteen and twenty thousand people to attend Mountain fair. The festival features artists, music, food and poetry.

Aspen Valley Foundation

A failed effort to develop a retirement community in Basalt is disappointing but not surprising to officials involved. 

Tom Griffiths, with the now defunct Aspen Valley Foundation, knew 19 months ago seeing the project through was a long shot. The foundation had lost its CEO and Griffiths began meeting with local governments, hospitals and banks. He wanted someone to take over the $105 million project.

Elise Thatcher

  The coroner’s office is getting its first full time position. The office now is a hodgepodge. The coroner and his employees are all part time. That can make handling a multitude of tasks difficult. Commissioners have approved paying for a full time deputy coroner.

Marci Krivonen

To make way for a new home in Aspen’s west end neighborhood, the property owner recently cut down several trees. That kind of removal must pass muster with the City of Aspen, which considers the trees in town a “community forest.” Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with city forester Ben Carlsen about when removing a tree is permitted.

Ben Carlsen is the City of Aspen Forester. He says the tree mitigation costs for the home on Aspen Street reached nearly $40,000.

Pages