APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Dusty Diaz, campaign manager for Yes on 3A and Aspen School District Board Member Sheila Wills on the proposed mill levy override on this year's ballot.


Almost 700 people voted in the Town’s first recall election.

Marci Krivonen

Officials with the White River National Forest told elected leaders in Pitkin County Tuesday (10/13) a government shutdown is a “very real possibility.” 

If a government shutdown comes as a result of disagreement over a budget in Washington, the public likely won’t notice. Forest Service staff would be laid off in December, when fewer jobs are filled. And, even though some ski resorts operate on Forest Service land, White River District Ranger Karen Schroyer says skiers and riders won’t be affected.


An Aspen Skiing Company executive has been chosen to help build a new statewide effort around Colorado’s multi-billion dollar outdoor recreation industry. Auden Schendler was named to an advisory committee for the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Industry Office. Schendler is the SkiCo’s Vice President of Sustainability.

Auden Schendler is the Aspen Skiing Company’s Vice President of Sustainability. Last week he was named to an advisory group for the new state office. 


Pitkin County will present several preliminary designs for a new airport terminal next week, on Oct. 22nd.

The concept drawings range from a single-story building to a two-story configuration. The designs incorporate community input given at community meetings last spring. Airport Director John Kinney said in a statement community comments led to designs where views are maximized, the size is appropriate and interior is intimate with a “small town feel.”

Aspen Global Change Institute


An expert in urbanization and land use change is speaking in Aspen Tuesday. She has advice for land use planners in Aspen.


Karen Seto is a professor at Yale. She studies why cities are growing, how they grow and how their growth impacts the environment. People are moving to cities at a more rapid pace than ever before. And, urban areas generate three-quarters of global greenhouse gas emissions. She says urbanization increases demand for resources.



  Glenwood Springs and Garfield County could see a new detox center. But it all depends on finding a place to put it. There hasn’t been one for the last few years, and that’s been hard for people struggling with substance abuse.

A few years ago, the Aspen Poets' Society published A Democracy of Poets of the Roaring Fork Valley and Beyond, a book that features poems by local poets. Marjory DeLuca, member of the society and owner of Aspen Graphic Solutions, helped design and publish the book. She says the response has been great and they're onto their second printing. DeLuca shares the process of creating the book, and the expansion of poetry in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Kim Nuzzo, co-founder and president of the Aspen Poets' Society, and Cam Scott, member of the society, also contribute. 

Learn more about the Aspen Poets' Society and their monthly live poetry readings at www.aspenpoetsociety.com or 379-2136.  

Pitkin County

Pitkin County residents will be registering their cars and voting in a different location soon.

The Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder’s office is planning to move into three different locations next year so the annex building it currently occupies can be remodeled. County staff on Wednesday will ask the commissioners to approve three leases that combined will cost the county nearly $19,000 a month in rent. That’s almost a half a million dollars over the 2 years the departments will be in their temporary offices. That doesn’t factor in altering the new spaces. Janice Vos Caudill is Pitkin County’s clerk and recorder.

Town of Snowmass Village

The Snowmass Town Clerk has received nearly 500 ballots so far in a recall election of a town council member. It’s the first time ever the town has held such an election.

The turnout so far isn’t unexpected. Town officials thought between 600 and 800 ballots would be returned. By election day Tuesday, the votes may total that. In a typical election for town council, about 900 people vote. But, this election isn’t typical. A citizen led effort got the recall question on the ballot after councilman Chris Jacobson was arrested and jailed for drunk driving. Organizers of the petition said Jacobson’s actions were “unworthy of a town council member.”