APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

  A community debate has begun in Aspen about the appropriateness of allowing naming rights for donors who help pay for school buildings and programs. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason in the studio to discuss that are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News, Aspen Times columnist Roger Marolt, Aspen Daily News columnist Wendle Whiting and by phone, Glenwood Post Independent editor Randy Essex.

You can hear more of the conversation this afternoon at 3:30 right here on Aspen Public Radio, or log onto aspenpublicradio dot org.

 

It’s high season in the world of scammers looking for the next victim in the Roaring Fork Valley. Whether it’s via email, text or phone, a rash of scams demanding personal information or money has prompted authorities and elected officials to warn people not to fall for the threats. Carolyn Sackariason has more.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

After Tuesday’s attack in Belgium, there’s extra law enforcement at the Aspen airport.

 

The Basalt spring election keeps getting hotter.

The city of Aspen needs help deciding how to use a 400-acre public parcel.

Barbara Platts

 Clark’s Market in Aspen shut its doors today for an entire store remodel which will take 10 to 12 weeks to complete.

Barbara Platts

Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) officials said they are on schedule to open all lanes in Glenwood Canyon the first week of May and the highway shouldn’t fully shut down again in the meantime.

  The Aspen School board is considering allowing naming rights to honor donors in a public way. If it chooses to do so, it would mean reversing a decades-old policy. Carolyn Sackariason reports.

The concept was presented to the board recently by the school district’s nonprofit fundraising arm, Aspen Education Foundation. Naming rights has been a contentious issue in the past and has not very gone far.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Mountain Rescue Aspen (MRA) is a volunteer run collective that’s existed for decades. Along with assisting law enforcement in search and rescue missions year round, they offer educational components about backcountry and mountain survival.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

  The Colorado Attorney General’s Office says Glenwood Springs doctor Frederick Oakes has repaid $16,006.32 to a state agency, after an investigation revealed the doctor had filed for extra Medicaid payments.

Cross Currents

Mar 23, 2016

Coming up on CrossCurrents, Partnering in Education and Aid for Kenya with Debbie Welden, Jane Keener Quiat, and Isaac Soita (SOY-tah) from Running Water International.

 

The presence of law enforcement will be constant at the Aspen Pitkin County Airport for the near future. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

Just like many places around the country, security is being beefed up at Sardy Field in response to Monday’s terrorist attacks in Brussels. Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo says he was asked by John Kinney, the airport’s director, to provide a deputy on site. The sheriff says an armed officer will be at the airport from the time it opens to the time it closes — for at least the next few days.

Elise Thatcher

Basalt Town Council has voted unanimously to give elected officials a pay raise. The change goes into effect this spring, for about half of the board.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

Aspen Pitkin County Airport Director John Kinney told City Council on Tuesday that it’s important to reach out to all interested parties prior to launching an environmental assessment required for a terminal expansion.

Elise Thatcher

  Water managers are planning to send extra water from Ruedi Reservoir downstream this summer and fall. That’s to help out fish species in the Colorado River, but the effort is once again raising concerns.

Elise Thatcher

The Basalt election keeps getting hotter. With two weeks until the end, voters have been dropping off ballots at Town Hall, and controversy over yard signs continues.

Elise Thatcher

Basalt is choosing from a list of four companies that want to build the town’s long-anticipated underpass.

Colorado law states that if a government agency is found to have “wrongfully withheld” public records, the plaintiff's court fees must be paid for by the agency. It’s a way of making sure individuals are not dis-incentivised for seeking public information just because they can’t afford the litigation costs that might result if the government refuses to hand over public records.

Pitkin County commissioners will be asked during their work session today to approve the $100,534

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

In the early stages of a land management plan for Cozy Point open space, the city of Aspen is attempting to reconcile the needs of an equestrian facility, sustainable farm, recreation enthusiasts and native wildlife.

Buddy Program Board Member and former Big Buddy, Peter Waanders, is joined by his little buddy of 10 years, Egbert Ospina. Waanders and Ospina met almost 14 years ago when Ospina was in 3rd grade. Now studying at American University and set to graduate in spring 2016, Ospina credits Waanders with his success and confidence. The two say their involvement as buddies with the Buddy Program's Community Mentoring Program not only changed their daily lives, but gave them a lifelong friendship.

Moose are starting to appear in more populated areas in Colorado. One was spotted only a couple of weeks ago in Glenwood Springs. Experts/wildlife officials said this is expected to become more common as the moose population continues to grow in the state. Aspen Public Radio’s Barbara Platts has the story.

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