APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

This week, we talk with Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent, about some of the biggest stories he's covered in his time in the Roaring Fork Valley. Essex is leaving his post for the Motor City, where he will be senior content director for business and auto news at the Detriot Free Press. 


Carbondale lawyer Karl Hanlon is running for congress, challenging incumbent Rep. Scott Tipton.

Denver Channel

Republicans in Congress are closer than ever to passing a tax plan, but, as the debate rages in Washington D.C., it can be hard to imagine how our community could be reshaped by its passage.

No time for turkey-induced comas around here. Hosts Christin Kay and Wyatt Orme bring you all the news from this week in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Michael Miville

The Aspen Institute’s next president and CEO will be Dan Porterfield.


In 1982, the City of Aspen and Pitkin County signed an agreement creating the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority (APCHA). Now, in 2017, there are nearly 3,000 regulated units for sale and rent, and yet we are still in a housing crunch.

Courtesy Photo

 A memorial service has been set for valley native Collin Gibbard. He was born in Aspen, attended Basalt High School and studied at the University of Northern Colorado. He worked in the valley as a carpenter. This year he became the framing supervisor for Peak Interiors.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

This was the first year that all boats using Ruedi Reservoir were screened for invasive species of mussels. Finding funding to continue the program will be no easy task.

HaitiChildren provides care and education to abandoned, orphaned and disabled children in Haiti. The organization operates a rehabilitation and therapy center, schools and water projects and works to employ Haitians at all its facilities.  

Today on Cross Currents, Susie Krabacher, co-founder and CEO of HaitiChildren, and Robin Hamill, president of the nonprofit, sit down with host Christin Kay.




Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The U.S. Forest Service said more than 320,000 people biked, bussed or drove to the Maroon Bells Scenic Area this season. That’s another record-setting year.

Students from Pakistan will visit the Carbondale Community School on Wednesday.

Courtesy of Johan Bos from Pexels

The City of Aspen will continue to get some of its renewable energy from a nonprofit based in Nebraska.


Courtesy of Jesse Wey

Earlier this year, the Town of Basalt signed on to Eagle County’s climate action plan. Tuesday, Town Council is expected to sign a letter of intent to work with other communities in the county to reduce greenhouse gases. But Basalt isn’t going to commit any money toward the collaborative.


Up until now, Women's Forum has grown strictly by word of mouth. Founder, Adelaide Waters, says that all women come together from the same starting point.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies/aspennature.org

The 2018 lineup for local speaker series Naturalist Nights includes regional experts on topics from the geology of Glenwood Canyon to the world’s finest guano.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The Aspen Skiing Company is satisfied with the number of skiers and snowboarders who hit the slopes on Thanksgiving.

Aspen City Council is scheduled to discuss two new affordable housing developments Monday. Both require higher density zoning than their neighborhoods currently allow.

U.S. Forest Service

Officials with Colorado Parks and Wildlife are urging people to skip the shopping and get outside today.

Courtesy of Noah Hoffman

Professional skiers in a warming world find themselves in an icy position. Their livelihood relies on snow and cold temperatures, but essentials like travel and snowmaking come with an environmental cost. So, how do athletes stand by their convictions and make a living?