APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Elise Thatcher

Officials are pushing to rebuild the Front Range after devastating floods That includes a direct line to the Roaring Fork Valley… a railroad line, that is. Tracks west of Denver were washed out-- and that means changes for Amtrak service to Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has more.

Reporter: Jeff Hershenson, who lives in Snowmass Village, is at the Glenwood Springs Amtrak station on a recent gorgeous fall day. He says the competitive fare prompted him to buy a ticket to Denver.

Valley Roundup - October 4th, 2013

Oct 4, 2013

Rundown Pending

Marci Krivonen

Tamales are a special kind of cuisine in Mexico. They fall into the category of comfort food and they’re often served for breakfast and dinner. Here, in the Roaring Fork Valley, Mexican families make tamales during special occasions, like birthdays. Recently, a group of Latina and Anglo women gathered in a fragrant kitchen to make hundreds of tamales. It’s a cross-cultural cooking experience and part of the preparation for an event called Fiesta de Tamales in Basalt. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Mountain Edition - October 3rd, 2013

Oct 3, 2013

It’s been a big news week and one story with big impacts locally is the federal government shutdown. We take a look at what it means for the Roaring Fork Valley.

Obamacare hit the internet on Tuesday, turns out, health care plans coordinated by Colorado are way more expensive in mountain towns.

After massive floods walloped oil and gas operations, we hear ideas about making sure oil and gas operations are better protected down the road.

Local officials had to decide by Tuesday whether to take steps to allow retail marijuana in the Roaring Fork Valley. Many have decided to delay their verdict.

We get an update from one of the ten Aspen-area athletes hoping to compete in the upcoming Winter Olympics in Russia.

And finally, tamales are a humble Latin American dish with deep, historical roots. They’re the main fare at an upcoming Roaring Fork Valley event.

Ski Co Offers Free Gondola Rides This Weekend

Oct 3, 2013
File Photo

For tourists streaming in this week for prime leaf viewing season, the Federal government shutdown may be altering their plans. The Forest Service closed the gates to vehicle traffic to the Maroon Bells on Tuesday. So, now, the Aspen Skiing Company is offering free gondola rides this weekend on Aspen Mountain.

Some of the effects of lawmakers’ continuing impasse on the federal budget are easy to see in the Roaring Fork Valley. The government shutdown has affected federal offices that handle outdoor recreation and other agencies. And as Elise Thatcher reports, it's not clear what effect it could have on social services.

Reporter: The government shutdown is visible along Highway 82. Traffic signs flash warnings to drivers, saying the road to the Maroon Bells is closed to cars and busses.. And if you poke around, there are other indications, too.

Kitty Boone of the Aspen Institute with Dr. Kathy Klug on this year's Western Slope College Fair, Sunday October 6th.

More about the fair at: cwscollegefair.org

snowpeak/Flickr/Creative Commons

The government shutdown in Washington is limiting access to one Colorado’s most visited places: the Maroon Bells. The road outside of Aspen closed to traffic yesterday during prime leaf-peeping season. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The White River National Forest closed its facilities in the area Tuesday morning. Bathrooms are locked and campgrounds shuttered. The agency barricaded the popular parking areas just below the famed peaks. Pitkin County owns the two-lane road leading to the Bells. And, yesterday county commissioners were grappling with what to do.

http://kotaku.com

Today, Tuesday October 1st, marks one of the first deadlines for communities in how they choose to regulate retail marijuana. Colorado towns and counties are supposed to decide whether they’re going to allow the growing, buying and selling of recreational pot next year… And many communities around the state have decided to put their decision on hold.

Oliver Kraus/USSA

Our series continues this week with a look at how winter athletes are chosen for the U.S. Olympic team. The competition is fierce. Athletes who train together often become competitors. There’s a set of guidelines athletes must meet to grab one of a handful of open spots in each event, whether it’s cross-country team sprint, snowboard half-pipe or alpine super-G. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen talked to Tom Kelly with the United States Ski and Snowboard Association, or USSA, about the process.

tedeytan/Flickr/Creative Commons

More than two-thirds of Colorado residents say they don’t understand President Obama’s Affordable Care Act. That’s according to a USA Today poll taken earlier this month.

Valley Roundup - September 27th, 2013

Sep 27, 2013

President Barack Obama made an announcement today about the battle in Congress.

One of the first deadlines for so called retail marijuana is fast approaching. By next Tuesday, October 1st, local communities are supposed to decide if they’re going to allow the pot to be grown, sold, and otherwise available in the community in the coming year.

“It’s pretty much going to be clustered in just a handful of areas. Denver and Boulder I think are the big cities, and then there’s mountain communities as well.”

John Ingold is a reporter for the Denver Post.  He’s keeping an eye on how the state is getting ready for retail marijuana and says even pot-friend places like Denver questions remain.

“There is concern about advertising, distances from schools, zoning, those kinds of things.”

Aspen Public Radio takes a look at a unique documentary showing at the Aspen Filmfest. It takes viewers inside one of the nation’s busiest emergency rooms where patients often wait hours for care.

And on the Download this week, we explore glitches with new iPhones, brainwashing kids to pay for movies & music and other unusual ventures in education.

Mountain Edition - September 26th, 2013

Sep 27, 2013

Heavy flooding on the Front Range has resulted in a mess. Oil and animal excrement from feedlots have spilled into or near rivers. The flooding put dams on the Front Range to the test as walls of water rushed down canyons and into towns. We’ll talk to the chief of dam safety for the state. The Roaring Fork Valley deals with suicide often more than other Colorado communities. One local non profit is trying to change that. Federal health care reform kicks into high gear next week when people can shop online for insurance. But, even with insurance, some patients struggle to get care. And, every month a Ute Indian spiritual leader leads a sweat in a cavern in Glenwood Springs. We’ll take you to the healing ceremony. And finally, we’ll introduce you to a local winter Olympic hopeful who learned to ride horses before she got on skis.

codeblackmovie.com

A documentary film featured in this year’s Aspen Filmfest uses a chaotic emergency room to highlight the country's overloaded health care system. Code Black follows a group of young, idealistic E.R. residents who work in what seasoned doctor’s call “C-Booth” at Los Angeles County hospital. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with Ryan McGarry, an E.R. doctor and the director of the film.

Marci Krivonen

A member of the Ute Indian Tribe is holding traditional sweats in Glenwood Springs in an effort to keep his culture alive. Each month, Kenny Frost takes a small group into the depths of a cave warmed by natural hot springs. The cave is where his ancestors came to heal. And, he hopes his sweats bring back to life a culture that’s losing its traditions quickly. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen Hope Center

Suicide is a real problem in the Roaring Fork Valley… this year nine people have died by suicide, normally a year’s total. Statewide, more than a thousand people died by suicide in 2012. An Aspen organization is trying to tackle the problem in the Roaring Fork Valley. One of their methods is training locals to act when friends or family might be at risk…. The Hope Center held a training in Aspen on Tuesday, September 24th.

Sandy Iglehart: “So tonight you’re gonna learn how to possibly help someone that’s in crisis.”

Creative Commons/Flickr/The National Guard

The Affordable Care Act continues to roll out with the opening of something called a marketplace next week. That’s where people can shop for health insurance. Health care reform also expands Medicaid - the government-subsidized health plan for low-income people. Currently, many doctors in the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond don’t accept Medicaid patients because the plan gives providers a dismal reimbursement. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, some doctors say the issue highlights a fundamental problem with the health care system.

Buildearth.org

Officials are also reviewing dams along the Front Range. The state agency in charge of dam safety says all of the high risk ones did well during recent flooding -- those are dams where a lot of people could get hurt if they fail. But several smaller dams weren’t able to handle the record amount of rain. Bill McCormick oversees dam safety for Colorado. He says this could end up affecting how dams on the Western Slope are managed.

U.S. Ski Team

The Road to Sochi is a look at the ten athletes from the Aspen area who are training with the hopes of making it onto the 2014 Winter Olympic team.

Aspen School Board Takes Neutral Stance on Amendment 66

Sep 24, 2013
Creative Commons/Flickr/Editor B

The Aspen School Board yesterday, decided against taking a formal stance on Amendment 66. It's a school finance reform measure voters will see on the November ballot.

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