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APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Facebook/Michael Ward

Today, we look at one of three Aspen-area athletes who competes in cross country skiing. Michael Ward is one of the youngest on the US Nordic team. He’s just 20-years-old. Still, he’s hoping to beat the older competition so he can land a spot on the U.S. Olympic team. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

The removal of more than three dozen trailers from a mobile home park in Basalt is continuing ahead of work to restore the Roaring Fork River’s shores. The trailer homes sit in a floodplain and the local government is working on getting residents out of danger. They plan to replace the trailers with a public park. So far, a handful of trailers have been hauled away. Still, many residents remain. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, they’re hoping to find inexpensive housing.

Valley Roundup - October 25th, 2013

Oct 25, 2013

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley and  beyond.

On the show today Curtis Wackerle, Managing Editor of the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone, a columnist for the Aspen Times join us to discuss the following issues in the news this week

Marci Krivonen

The Town of Basalt held a groundbreaking ceremony yesterday for a major river project set to get underway Monday.

The so-called Pan and Fork project will replace a trailer park with a public park and an improved floodway and riverbank. Construction starts in earnest on Monday. Town Manager Mike Scanlon says he wanted to get the word out now.

mape_s/Flickr/Creative Commons

The Forest Service is chipping away at plans to improve habitat on 10’s of thousands of acres in the Roaring Fork Valley. The large-scale project includes thinning overgrown vegetation in areas like the Frying Pan and Crystal River Valleys. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Mountain Edition - October 24th, 2013

Oct 24, 2013

It’s election time and we’re taking a look at issues on the November ballot and what they could mean for a voter’s tax bill. First, there’s a statewide income tax increase for public schools.

And, there’s a local proposal to build a rec center in the Mid-Valley. Supporters say will enhance the community, while critics say it would mean hundreds more in property taxes for homeowners.

Basalt residents are being asked to redevelop land along the Roaring Fork River. The plan forces out more than a hundred people from a trailer park.

Finally, we’ll hear the latest weather forecast for the coming winter… there’s good news, and bad news.

discoveryspringtexas.com

 We’ve reported this week, starting Monday October 21st, on the various tax increases proposed in measures in next month’s election.  If all of them and Amendment 66 pass it could be one of the most expensive recent elections for many mid-valley voters.  The question is how expensive

Elise Thatcher

The winter outlook is mixed. Although some are saying the wet fall could mean lots of snow in the coming months, a National Weather Service forecaster says there might also be some dry spells. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with GJ National Weather Service forecaster Joe Ramey. He says this winter might be very familiar.

Marci Krivonen

This week we’ve been reporting on some of the tax measures that are on the November ballot. One question Basalt voters will see concerns the restoration of the Roaring Fork River running through town. Question 2B seeks permission from voters to issue $5 million worth of bonds. The dollars would help move along a project that began with the removal of mobile homes in danger of flooding. Opponents of the measure says it’s rife with problems. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

snowpeak/Flickr/Creative Commons

The Maroon Bells took a big financial hit from the government shutdown this month.  As a result there might be some cutbacks at the Maroon Bells next year. The Forest Service lost revenue because it was unable to collect entrance fees.

Reporter: Scott Fitzwilliams oversees the White River National Forest… and he describes the shutdown as “cantankerous.”

winterolympics.edublogs.org

Not all of the athletes who train in Aspen will be heading to the Olympics, some will compete in the Paralympics, which are also held in Russia. These Games in March feature events like alpine skiing, biathlon and wheelchair curling.

Seven athletes on the U.S. Paralympic National Team train in Aspen. And, they’ve got a good shot at making the Paralympic team. Kevin Jardine works with the U.S. Olympic Committee and helps out in Aspen, with the Aspen Valley Ski and Snowboard Club’s Adaptive Program. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen.

Rocky Mountain Institute

A new report on non-profit organizations shows charities in the Mountain West have the among the lowest pay for high level staff among nonprofits across the country.   The survey by Charity Navigator found one standout here.  The top official at the environmental non-profit, Rocky Mountain Institute, was recently paid much more than counterparts at other non-profits, in fact, many times more.  (You can read the entire Charity Navigator report here.)

Mid-Valley Recreation Center?

Oct 21, 2013
Crown Mountain Recreation District

  This week we are looking at the various tax increase questions before voters next month.  One of the largest projects in the valley seeking voter approval is the proposed recreation center in Basalt.  The indoor facility would be built in the Crown Mountain Park. Aspen Public Radio's Roger Adams reports.

“For me, I think it’s a great amenity, I think its an amenity for everyone who lives here and I think it’s the next step in the progression of any community.”

Valley Roundup - October 18th, 2013

Oct 18, 2013

On the show today Carolyn Sackariason and Andy Stone join us to discuss the closing of Little Annie’s in Aspen.  It’s one more landmark of Aspen’s funky days that will likely disappear.

Aspen Valley Hospital chooses a new CEO.  In his job interview he named transparency as a high priority.

Also today, parking fees are set to go up in Aspen next year and a new book about Lance Armstrong blames him for the biggest sports conspiracy…ever.

And on the Download this week…the bumpy rollout of Obamacare’s tech side

Its all head on today’s Valley Roundup.

Mountain Edition - October 17th, 2013

Oct 17, 2013

Businesses currently selling medical marijuana will be allowed to sell recreational pot on January 1st, if they’re willing to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for a license. Dispensary owners say the added business would be a boon.

The story of Lance Armstrong’s fall from grace continues to unfold. In a new book, two Wall Street Journal reporters explore the financial underpinnings of how and why the cyclist cheated.

A coal mine over the mountains near Paonia recently laid off many of its employees. The layoffs and that could hurt local communities.

And, we’ll examine at coal mining across the country and look into the challenges the industry’s currently facing.

Finally, we introduce you to a young female snowboarder looking to make the Olympic team in a new event - snowboard slopestyle.

Medical Marijuana Businesses Prepare to go "Retail"

Oct 16, 2013
Marci Krivonen

The Aspen City Council this week approved the sale of recreational marijuana. At first, this marijuana will be sold by stores currently operating as medical marijuana dispensaries or those that have applied to become a dispensary. City officials say as many as eight shops could part of this new industry come January.

One of those is LEAF Aspen, which is currently a medical marijuana shop. Next year LEAF Aspen plans to sell both recreational and medical pot. The storefront is in Aspen, and the store grows marijuana at a storage unit in Carbondale. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen took a tour.

Originally aired April 17th, 2013

Huts for Vets, a non-profit founded in January, will lead three day wilderness hut trips at no cost, to veterans beginning this summer.

Paul Anderson, founder and ED of Huts for Vets, along with Board members Dr. Gerald Alpern and Brian Porter talk about the program.

Marci Krivonen

Organizers of Aspen’s first-ever bike share program are calling its inaugural season a success. We Cycle’s last day is November first. It will reopen next summer. This year the system saw more than 9000 rides over four months. It includes 100 bikes parked at 13 stations scattered around town. Riders check out the bikes for 30 minute rides through Aspen. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with We-Cycle’s co-founder Mirte Mallory.

Elise Thatcher

Two weeks ago, the coal mine near Paonia owned by billionaire Bill Koch laid off more than half of its employees. The Koch owned Oxbow Mining company hopes to expand operations again in the future and rehire some of the workers.  In the meantime the layoffs are creating hardships for a number of communities.

Mike Ludlow: “It’s very sad time around the mine, you know to lose your income and lose your job is real traumatic, so it’s very painful decision for us.”

allisports.com

Our Road to Sochi series takes a look at the Aspen-area athletes training and competing this fall in hopes of making the 2014 Olympic team. Today, we take you to an extreme snowsports course, one with rails and big jumps. It’s new to the Olympics, but competing in Snowboard Slopestyle is something Jordie Karlinski has been doing for years. The petite 24-year-old is hoping this year, she’ll be throwing tricks in Sochi, Russia. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

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