APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

aspenpitkin.com

The landfill in Pitkin County is nearing the end of its life and one new program may keep it open longer. Organizers of what’s called the SCRAPS program are working with individuals and restaurants to compost food waste. It’s estimated 30 percent of the County’s compacted trash stream is food waste that could be composted. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Your Evening News - December 5th, 2014

Dec 5, 2014

ACES is Aces with Charity Reviewer

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies has gotten more phone calls and emails than usual today. That’s because the charity has been chosen as one of the best of its kind in the country. The national nonprofit reviewer Charity Navigator has listed ACES as the top botanical garden, park, or nature center. That’s in an online Holiday Giving Guide, put together by the well-respected charity review. ACES CEO Chris Lane found out about the accolade from a reporter with the Aspen Times.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a look at the week’s news with various writers and editors in the valley.

This week the Aspen City Council decided on a new plan to increase the number of lodging beds in town. But, is anyone happy with the plan?

It looks like the economy has recovered as there is very little vacancy in the commercial core of Aspen.

Does Pitkin County need bigger bike lanes? We might just get them.

A local service man, Captain William H. DuBois is being remembered.

Glenwood Springs wants to get tough on unlocked trash.

Your Morning News - December 5th, 2014

Dec 5, 2014

Krabloonik to Get New Owners

There are officially new owners of the Valley’s troubled dog sled operation. Danny and Gina Phillips have completed paperwork for buying Krabloonik Fine Dining and Dogsledding, based in Snowmass Village.

The couple, also in Snowmass, is taking over the operation. It’s been on unsteady ground since the founder, Dan MacEachen was charged with animal cruelty. That was late last year and MacEachen is expected to stand trial in May.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Aspen City Council decides to take up lodging incentives again-- but much more cautiously.

Garfield County Commissioners suggest alternate routes for energy companies to reach leases on the contested Thompson Divide.

And the Glenwood Springs Police Department aims to crack down on people who don’t lock up their trash from bears.

The USA Pro Challenge announces Aspen will be included again in its route for 2015, only this time it won’t be the start.

Your Evening News - December 4th, 2014

Dec 4, 2014

Snowmass Village Takes Public Comment on Council Replacement

The Town of Snowmass Village is taking public comment on its effort to fill a fifth town council seat. Voters last month elected Markey Butler as Snowmass Village mayor, so the council seat she previously held became available. On Monday, town council members interviewed eight citizens interested in filling the seat. Now it’s up to the community to narrow the pool before the council votes for a candidate on December 8th. Butler said in a statement the council is calling on the community to help identify which candidate is a good fit on council and a good representative for the community. The interviews with the eight candidates can be seen online at tosv.com. Feedback must be submitted to the town via email before Monday’s meeting.

Bad Flu Circulating in Colorado

Colorado’s health department is warning the flu season could be especially bad this winter. That’s because a certain strain has been showing up more often. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Employment says influenza A is more likely to send someone to the hospital and it’s been the culprit for most cases this year.

There’s been a bump in people getting sick from the strain at nursing homes and assisted living facilities. In other years, Influenza A has caused more hospitalizations and deaths.

The Health Department is recommending signing up the flu vaccine to best avoid it, although officials also admit about half of the flu viruses showing up are not in this winter’s flu shot.

Marci Krivonen

A Basalt-based conservation group is putting some science behind water problems on the Crystal River. A drought in 2012 made clear the need to improve the river’s health, when stream flows dropped to a trickle. 

The problem with the Crystal River that runs through Redstone and Carbondale, is sometimes there’s not enough water and too much dirt. Heavy sedimentation can smother fish and aquatic insects. In 2012, American Rivers named the river one of the most endangered in the country.

The Roaring Fork Conservancy wants to do more than just raise awareness, so it created a management plan. Right now, the group’s gathering data about the riverbed. Heather Tattersall is with the Conservancy.

"So (we’re) making a computerized model of what the Crystal River looks like, as far as where there are pools, where it’s flat, where it’s deep. So we’ll be able to take that model of the river and say, ‘Ok, if we add this much water to it, how much fish habitat do we create? If we take water away from it, where does it get hurt?’"

Once the modeling is complete, the Conservancy may take steps like restoring the river bank or narrowing a river channel.

Your Morning News - December 4th, 2014

Dec 4, 2014

Big Bike Race Comes Back to Aspen

Aspen will be included in the USA Pro Challenge once again.The route for the 2015 cycling race was announced live on Denver’s 9news this morning. The race starts on August 17th in Steamboat Springs and moves through Arapahoe Basin and Copper before it arrives in Aspen. From Aspen, the cyclists head to Breckenridge.

Aspen has hosted the race several times. In August of this year, it started in Aspen/Snowmass.

Glenwood Springs Police Department

If you live in Glenwood Springs, and bear gets into your trash, the police will give you a warning. If it happens again, even a few times, you might get a small fine. But that could change after recommendations from the city’s Police Department. Officials are considering cracking down on people letting bears eat their garbage. The move comes after an unusually high amount of bear and trash problems in the last year. APR’s Elise Thatcher talks with Chief Terry Wilson.

Your Evening News - December 3rd, 2014

Dec 3, 2014

Gov. Hickenlooper Apologizes for Sand Creek Massacre

On November 29th, 1864, Colorado militia volunteers slaughtered up to 150 women, children, and elderly members of the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes at Sand Creek. Today, Governor John Hickenlooper apologized to the descendants of the Massacre at the 150th Anniversary and Commemoration Ceremony. Hickenlooper says he doesn’t make the announcement lightly and it follows his discussions with all the former living governors of the state.

Pages