APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

David Anderson is the director of the Colorado Natural History Program, which gathers data on Colorado's habitat that is used for conservation efforts and land management. 

David is in town for Naturalist Nights.  He'll speak at the 3rd Street Center in Carbondale on February 21 and at ACES in Aspen on February 22.  

Ahead of those events, he talked to Christin Kay about the importance of protecting rare species. 


Courtesy of Jesse Wey

Voters in Basalt can meet their town council candidates Tuesday evening.


On a recent Saturday, a dozen or so people gathered at the Glenwood Springs Library to learn how to agree to disagree. The training, called “Crossing the Divide,” was put on by Indivisible Roaring Fork, the local chapter of a national political group, formed in opposition to the Trump administration.

Non-Profit in the Spotlight: Aspen Words, Week 3

Feb 19, 2018

Jamie Kravitz, Managing Director of Aspen Words, explains the importance of their new Literary Prize, which launched last year. 

Claire Woodcock / Aspen Public Radio

After a lengthy selection process, City of Aspen staff will recommend the Aspen Public House to rent the restaurant space in the Wheeler Opera House.

Notes from Pyeongchang: Local green efforts

Feb 18, 2018
Ruthie Brown

The cross country stadium and biathlon stadiums are surrounded by wind turbines working on the surrounding hills. Some days the air quality is so bad it’s hard to see them.

The environmental movement seems to be tied to the religious freedom movement. Whatever it takes!

On this week's special Valley Roundup, Alycin Bektesh talks with Ken Rudin, host of NPR's Political Junkie, about the current political climate and what might be coming up in the 2018 elections. 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County adopted new regulations this week that allow residents to capture and reuse water from some kinds of indoor plumbing.

Colorado Mountain College

Last week, Colorado Mountain College announced plans to change tuition costs next year. The majority of students will pay more, but some will pay less.

This week on Mountain Edition, Christin Kay and Alycin Bektesh bring you the biggest local news stories from the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Mysterious bottles are turning up along the Roaring Fork River, the City of Aspen says going au natural at the ARC pool is healthy and government officials say it’s time to re-think the management of affordable housing.

The Poets in Schools program from Aspen Words is in its fifth year of bringing spoken word artists to area schools.

These resident poets run writing workshops with students for two weeks. The program culminates in students performing their original work at the annual Youth Poetry Slam.

Aspen Public Radio News

Elected officials from Aspen, Snowmass Village and Pitkin County will discuss spending $40,000 to analyze the need for an improved pedestrian crossing at Buttermilk.

This week Aspen City Council member Adam Frisch expressed concern about oversight of the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority (APCHA).

The Roaring Fork Valley Regional Planning Commission is reviewing the plan guiding land-use decisions in the parts of Eagle County over here. On Thursday, they are looking at Missouri Heights.

Courtesy of Peter Olenick

Carbondale native Peter Olenick is a freestyle skiing pioneer and an 11-time X-Games competitor who won four medals in three different events. This winter, he’ll be at the 2018 Winter Olympics, representing the home team. Olenick is the coach of the South Korean freestyle ski team. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy caught up with him on a quick trip home before he took off for Pyeongchang and brings us this report.

Basalt Police Department

Last week, Basalt Police found a collection of bottles in the Roaring Fork River, wrapped in duct tape, with a mysterious liquid inside. Authorities are advising the public to please not open them.


The City of Aspen says a natural filter at the Aspen Recreation Center pool has improved water quality.

Elise Thatcher

  Aspen councilmember Adam Frisch expressed concern about the Aspen Pitkin Housing authority Monday night. He gained support from his fellow council members in suggesting a work session to address the way the authority is governed.


Verizon needs to fix its "very unreliable” service, Basalt’s mayor Jacque Whitsitt wrote recently in a letter to the company.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The U.S. Forest Service received 11 objections to a draft decision on a logging project in the Upper Fryingpan Valley. The objections come from home and property owners, environmental groups like Wilderness Workshop and the Roaring Fork Audubon Society, the Town of Basalt and a mill in Montrose that would receive some of the timber.