APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Jim Salter leaves his mark on Aspen

Jun 25, 2015

By all accounts, Jim Salter was one of the smartest people who spent time in Aspen, and he had the dogs to match.

 

 

"He also had the most intelligent dogs," says Bill Stirling is a long-time resident and former mayor of aspen. His late wife, Katharine Thalberg, founded Explore Bookstore, where Stirling met Salter. "They were corgis. They were very long and low to the ground and highly intelligent which would be just the kind of dog Jim would have. You could almost speak to those dogs and expect a pretty good reply from them."

Marci Krivonen

Supporters for more protection for the Crystal River are hitting the road again. The goal is a Wild and Scenic River designation, but that takes an Act of Congress. Supporters have crafted a bill and want to get approval from local governments. And yes, they’ve already done something similar.

Elise Thatcher

Residents in the Roaring Fork Valley pedaled their support for Colorado’s bike to work day yesterday. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher stopped by a RFTA booth with fortification for riders.

Alycin Bektesh/Aspen Public Radio News

  Radio. Garrison Keillor, host of Prairie Home Companion, was in town Wednesday to deliver the keynote address at an Aspen Words benefit dinner. He stopped by the Aspen Public Radio and spoke with News Director Carolyn Sackariason about the future of his decades-long variety show.

For the full interview, tune in at 3:30 this afternoon, or check the website later today.

 

 

Linda Girvin, Aspen artist on her show Presence with Absence, showing now at the Wyly Annex, with an artist's talk Wednesday June 24th at 5:30pm.

Screenshot/Mike Scanlon

Basalt officials are working with the District Attorney’s office regarding a pending marijuana business deal in that town. Officials are trying to figure out what business arrangements may be behind a Craigslist ad that appeared late last month. It was for marijuana "medical and recreational permits and license for sale."

Facebook/Protegete:Nuestro Aire, Nuestra Salud

The number of ethnic minorities involved in environmental organizations across the country is dismally low and it’s the same in the Roaring Fork Valley. Some statewide groups have noticed the problem and are creating programs for the Latino community. They say reaching this population is an important step toward reducing carbon emissions. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dulce Saenz immigrated with her family to Colorado from Mexico when she was a toddler. She says she heard the term “carbon footprint” for the first time last year.

Marci Krivonen

In Aspen’s busy summer season, about 1500 vehicles move through downtown intersections each day. To make streets safer, city council made it a priority, creating the “Rethink the Streets” program. It includes a temporary project at the corner of Galena and Hopkins. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen met City Engineer Trish Aragon there. Here's their interview:

Trish Aragon is City Engineer in Aspen. The city is holding an ice cream chat to take feedback on the downtown street project Wednesday afternoon, starting at 4 pm outside of city hall.

On Tuesday night, Carbondale elected officials began discussing a proposed new City Market in town. Town Trustees decided to waive a layer of community review of the project.

For 25th Anniversary, JAS Founder Reflects

Jun 23, 2015

This weekend is the 25th year of Jazz Aspen Snowmass. In addition to a June lineup that includes Chicago, the Count Basey Orchestra, Maceo Parker and Rodrigo y Gabriella, Labor Day brings in acts like No Doubt. Jim Horowitz, the founder of the event sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort to talk about the festival and the challenges it faces today.

On how the festival scene has changed... 

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