APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

An Aspen City Council member is leaving his day job at the end of the month. Related Colorado, which is the developer behind Snowmass Base Village, says Dwayne Romero will be replaced as company president on April first. In a company announcement, Romero says he’s proud of the work he’s done at Related over the past seven years. Romero will be replaced by Jim D’Agostino who is coming back to the firm following his departure in 2012.

news.stanford.edu

Life expectancy in the United States is radically longer now compared to a hundred years ago. Researcher Laura Carstensen studies what life is like during our later years. She’s Director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, and spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about exploring what we can do with longer lives.

http://aspen.siretechnologies.com/

Aspen City Council has chosen a public-private model for the Old Power House. Council members decided that what’s been dubbed the “Power Plant” proposal is the best fit for the previous Art Museum building on Mill Street. It's a combination of the Aspen Brewing Company and small business incubator space. It also includes local TV station Aspen 82 and space for meetings and events. Council member Ann Mullins described it as “a unique Aspen mix of fun and work.”

nwcoloradohunting.com

Colorado Parks and Wildlife wants input on how it should operate in the coming years. The agency generates its own $200 million dollar budget. The lion’s share comes from hunting licenses and similar fees. And that revenue is dropping because the agency is selling fewer licenses. CPW is looking for public input on how to make up for the losses, which could include new user fees. 

Jeremy Swanson/Aspen Snowmass

Despite a dearth of snowfall in January and part of last month, the Aspen Skiing Co. is reporting an uptick in business. 

The Aspen Skiing Company says it is pacing ahead of last season despite being open fewer days compared to 2013-14. While season pass holders skied less during the dry spells, international visitors made up for the loss. The company says it expects to finish the year strong.

Scott Turner is the Assistant District Attorney of the Ninth Judicial District in Glenwood Springs. He works with River Bridge Regional Center on child abuse cases. In this episode, Turner talks about the challenges and rewards of his job, and Mental Health Therapist, Meghan Hurley, shares statistics on local cases and offenders.  

Learn more about River Bridge at www.RiverBridgeRC.org

https://www.facebook.com/meleyna.kistner/photos

    Family members of two Midwestern residents packed a Pitkin County courtroom last week, telling a judge why a Basalt resident should be held accountable for an accident she caused on Highway 133 in August. Indiana student Meleyna Kistner died and her boyfriend, Daniel Thul, was injured. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story on what comes next for their families and the defendant.

White River National Forest

The head of the White River National Forest says the agency is doing more with less as it continues to battle budget cuts from Washington D.C. 

Forest Supervisor Scott Fitzwilliams told elected officials, conservation groups and business leaders Friday that the White River is grappling with tight funding. During a “state of the forest” address he said the budget is almost half of what it was five years ago, and staffing levels are down.

He says nearly all of the agency’s budget is being used to fund fixed costs, like salaries and rents, leaving little for side projects.

Creative Commons/Flickr/USDA

Research of wildfire history in Aspen’s Smuggler Mountain and Hunter Creek areas is providing a window into how a future fire may behave. It’s important work given the close proximity of those forests to downtown Aspen. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Jason Sibold, a researcher at Colorado State University.

Jason Sibold researched wildfire history near Aspen. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. Last week Pitkin County announced the formation of a new wildfire council that will work on fire mitigation in our region.

aspensciencecenter.org

When the Aspen City Council makes a decision tonight on who will occupy the old Powerhouse building, how much the tenant will pay in rent will not be a factor. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Who ever is chosen among the five finalists for the space on Mill Street will have to negotiate rent and other financial matters with city officials. The Aspen Art Museum paid the city just one dollar a year to occupy the space.

Assistant City Manager Barry Crook says the lease details were intentionally omitted from the selection process.

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