APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

John Sarpa is a long-time local who is a graduate of  the Roaring Fork Leadership program and then served as the President of the Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership. Often confused for the name of the organization, Roaring Fork Leadership is the 9-month long program that trains professionals in the Roaring Fork Valley to become better leaders, thinkers, and activists in their communities. 

Sarpa shares the history of the organization and its importance today. 

Elise Thatcher

Voters in Carbondale and Basalt are casting their ballots for the spring election, which ends Tuesday evening. Proponents of a new tax have raised-- and spent-- the most campaign dollars in Carbondale. In Basalt, that’s true of candidates for the mayor’s seat.

Barbara Platts

 

Closing days for the four mountains began yesterday at Buttermilk, where skiers and snowboarders came out for Bacon Appreciation Day.

City of Aspen

Commuters will experience a new look while traveling over Castle Creek Bridge beginning today — whether it be by foot, bicycle, or motor vehicle.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Feel like a fool today? You might if you believe what you read in one of the Aspen newspapers. An annual tradition for decades, the Aspen Daily Planet publishes fake news stories, opinion pages and ads every April 1. The content is aimed at being politically incorrect, satirical and self deprecating.

Rain barrel legislation cleared the state Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources and Energy Committee with the help of two Republicans joining Democrats to vote for it. If law passes, it could affect gardening practices on a local level.

Elise Thatcher

  Mountain Family joins four of the biggest employers in the Aspen area, which created the Valley Health Alliance to help workers get healthier and save money for employees and employers.

Aspen Skiing Company announced yesterday that Aspen Highlands will remain open two additional weekends beyond the scheduled season. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

One hundred percent of the mountain’s terrain will reopen the weekends of April 23-24 and April 31-May 1. After the scheduled season ends on April 10, the bonus weekends bring the total amount of ski days in the 2015/2016 season to 154.

 

This week, on Mountain Edition:

  • Booze - specifically local booze - is a hit in the Valley

  • Carbondale voters will weigh in on a pair of tax measures this election

 PRESS RELEASE FROM ASPEN SKIING COMPANY:

Heavy Spring Snowfall, Deepest Base Depths of the Season and Winter-Like Conditions Allow Aspen Highlands to Open for the Weekends of April 23-24 and April 30-May 1

 

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

A prescribed burn is tentatively scheduled to take place later this month in the Hunter Creek Valley.

Carbondale Police Department

  Serious crime has gone up in Carbondale over the last year and a half, including the armed robbery at a retail store earlier this week.

Courtesy of White River National Forest

A new deputy supervisor for the White River National Forest was announced this week. Michael Donald is serving under Forest Supervisor Scott Fitzwilliams.

Colorado Children's Campaign

Child poverty levels declined in back to back years for the first time in more than a decade, according to the Colorado Children’s Campaign.

Credit Aspen Historical Society

In 1982, when Dick Butera took ownership of the Aspen Club, it was the largest private multi-sports facility in the nation - nearly 60,000 square feet.

  Carbondale voters are considering increasing taxes. One would allow property taxes to go up to help pay for capital costs — like sidewalks and roads. The other would tax electricity and natural gas use. As Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher reports, the energy tax is modeled closely on a similar one in Boulder.

One of the oldest bars and restaurants in downtown Aspen is closing. This time for good, its owner says. Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

Little Annies Eating House opened in 1972. And on April 17, it will close permanently. That’s according to owner Rohn Fleming. He took the over the fledgling business a few years ago and has tried to keep it going. But the economics have made it too difficult. He made the final decision on Friday.

Buddy Program Executive Director, David Houggy, talks about the organization and his vision for the future. The Buddy Program has been expanding its services in Carbondale, and are anticipating more growth in the coming years. 

Carolyn Sackariason

  The dream of building the first Habitat for Humanity house in Aspen has been quashed by the realities of development. Carolyn Sackariason reports.

 

In 2014, Habitat for Humanity Roaring Fork Valley had its sights set on building a duplex just east of Aspen. It’s where an old A-frame house on Cooper Avenue now sits.

But access issues from Highway 82 and neighbor concerns have derailed the project.

Scott Gilbert is the executive director of the local Habitat chapter.

facebook/Grand Traverse

Finishing the race in six and a half hours, teammates Max Taam and John Gaston, of Aspen, took first place, crossing back into Crested Butte before sunrise Saturday morning.

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