APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Ken Krehbiel via Facebook

Bear activity closed campgrounds, a moose charged a woman and her dog, and three mountain lion kittens were spotted along the Rio Grande trail — all in one day earlier this summer. Perry Will, area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), said days like this are becoming the new norm.

Madeleine Osberger/Aspen Daily News

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

The Aspen affordable housing program is in a mid-life crisis of sorts. How to manage nearly 3,000 subsidized units is weighing on public officials.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Barbara Platts present a compilation of the week’s news.

Madeleine Osberger/Aspen Daily News

  The unveiling of what’s now being called the “Basalt River Park” by a citizen’s committee earlier this week has turned some heads and raised some eyebrows. At $8 million dollars, elected officials and fiscal conservatives are wondering whether it’s worth it. Joining news director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone, columnist for the Aspen Times.

Last day for public input on biodiversity policy

Jul 14, 2016
Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

The public comment period for Open Space and Trails’ new biodiversity policy closes today after two extensions.

 

The draft policy sets biodiversity - not recreation - as the top priority in making decisions about Open Space and Trails’ properties.

Aspen Pitkin County Jail held an open house yesterday to showcase the facility’s latest renovations. Signs were hung around the jail for visitors to help give them an idea of what each room was. There was the nurse’s office, inmate’s cells, day rooms, gym and even a pat search area in the entry garage.

 

Courtesy of White River National Forest

Campers in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness will need to store all food and garbage in bear-resistant containers for the next five years.

This week on Cross Currents, Amanda Boxtel and Malibu Kelly Hayes talk about the Bridging Bionics Program.

Traffic counters parked for local projects

Jul 12, 2016
Aspen Public Radio News

Two traffic counts for separate government projects have been measuring activity in and out of Aspen at peak drive times to gather data for local management plans.

Troy Tyler sits in the back of his pickup at the intersection at 8th and Smuggler in the West End, watching the long line of cars and trucks headed out of town. He pushes a button on handheld machine indicating the behavior of each car, biker, or pedestrian, and he does this hundreds of times over two hours.

Bustang, the state’s first-ever inter-regional bus service, is celebrating its one-year anniversary today. And its popularity has exceeded expectations.

Operated by the Colorado Department of Transportation, Bustang has exceeded ridership predictions by 15,000 passengers. And revenue projections by 36 percent.

Bustang offers three major service routes: between Fort Collins and Denver, Colorado Springs and Denver, and Glenwood Springs and Denver. And last month, Bustang welcomed its 100,000th passenger.

JOHN CLIFT / FLICKR

A huge environmental issue in the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond is colony collapse disorder, in which beehives are being lost every year. Environment America is working to spread awareness of this issue through its No Bees, No Food campaign.

 Novelist Maria Semple, author of the bestselling "Where'd You Go Bernadette" and a new novel coming out this fall talks with host Carolyne Heldman. Semple was in Aspen as a teacher at this summer's Aspen Words.

 

Catherine Scales-Johnson is the Executive Director of Spellbinders, an organization that is best known for its in-school storytelling program. Told by volunteers, the stories span from folk tales and personal stories to historical fiction. All volunteers must go through a 14-hour training and continue to have regular meetings with other volunteers.

Volunteer teller, Adelaide Waters, shares her personal experience with Spellbinders and the inspiration for her own stories. 

City of Aspen

The scope of a new city development, combined with a booming construction market, has raised the price of building new police headquarters and affordable housing in Aspen.

Courtesy of City of Aspen

  Black bears looking for food have caused restrictions at Independence Pass campgrounds, and the U.S. Forest Service has no timeline to reopen those sites to tents.

  Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

In its attempt to get more social media followers, the Aspen Police Department had a bit of fun with the resort’s reputation as a party town.

Small plastic bag found at grocery store checkout causes internet stir

And time will tell if two developers who want to build lodging at the base of Aspen Mountain can play well together.

Joel Kotkin is the Presidential Fellow of Urban Futures at Chapman University and Executive Director of the Center for Opportunity Urbanism.

New wildfire prevention program for Eagle County homeowners

Jul 7, 2016
Courtesy, Eagle County

Eagle County is offering incentives to help homeowners protect their properties against wildfires.

Through the REALfire program, homeowners can meet with fire specialists to identify dangers, like stacked firewood and dry brush.

Eric Lovgren, Eagle County’s wildfire mitigation specialist, said government agencies are set up to prevent fires on public lands. Homeowners are responsible for their own land.

  On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Barbara Platts present a compilation of the week’s news.

Topics include:

  • The vice president of the united states visited aspen over the weekend

  • An elected official is giving away money

  • Northstar Nature Reserve may no longer be the party spot of past year.... .

  • A choreographer returns to Aspen

Post-fire weed pull in Hunter Creek on Saturday

Jul 6, 2016
Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Five local organizations are teaming up to organize a community weed pull this Saturday in the Hunter Creek Valley following a prescribed burn in the area in May.

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