APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Carolyn Sackariason

If a governmental entity wants to build in Aspen's city limits, they have to get a review in 60 days. But that fast track does not apply to building projects by the City of Aspen. Confused? Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher explains.

Ginny/Flickr/Creative Commons

It’s election day in Aspen and if you haven’t yet turned in a ballot, voting centers will be open from 7am to 7pm. 

People can vote at City Hall or the Red Brick Center for the Arts on East Hallam Street. If you still need to register, head to the Pitkin County Clerk’s office then bring your registration certification to either voting center to cast a ballot. Voters who filled out a mail ballot can drop those off at the voting centers. You can register until 7pm.

basaltchamber.org

Basalt’s Town Council will meet Tuesday to discuss whether to purchase a key parcel of land downtown. The meeting comes after the land parcel’s owner suggested the sale last week. 

The Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation owns 2.3 acres on what’s called the “Pan and Fork” site. The land has been eyed for development by the group Lowe Enterprises, which wants to build a hotel and condominiums. Council members had concerns with that proposal. Now, there’s an opportunity to purchase the parcel.

Carolyn Sackariason

The City of Aspen is finding itself in the position of many employers in the valley who find it difficult to attract qualified employees. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

The city manager’s office had to re-open the job posting for a parking director after the first round of 28 applicants didn’t produce the right candidate. One individual from outside of the area was offered the job but declined because of the cost of living and the lack of affordable housing.

Garfield County

Garfield County Commissioners are getting exasperated with an access dispute just outside Carbondale. They’re planning a public walking tour next week and meeting the week after to figure out how to resolve the matter.

Although the Aspen to Parachute Dental Health Alliance is young, they have a handful of successful projects that are helping to bring education, prevention and access to oral healthcare from Aspen to Parachute. Carrie Godes is a member of the Dental Alliance board of directors and works for Garfield County Public Health. She shares the organization's history and programs. 

Learn more about the Aspen to Parachute Dental Health Alliance at www.mygreatteeth.org

Marci Krivonen

A 120-year-old church in Aspen is raising money to renovate and expand. St. Mary’s Catholic Church on Main Street is one of the town’s most historic buildings. But it’s maxed out and church officials say more space is needed. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

For more than a century mass has been held regularly at St. Mary’s, even when miners moved out and the town’s population shrank.

Facebook/Aspen Police Dept.

The Aspen Police Department is fully staffed again, after a handful of officers announced earlier this year they were leaving. Four officers are joining the department. Two graduated from the Colorado Law Enforcement Training Academy on Friday.

Two of the new officers are already residents of the Roaring Fork Valley - Adriano Minniti and Seth DelGrasso. Josh Uhernik is from out of state. Duxton Milam is from the Front Range. Two of the four bring previous law enforcement experience.

aspenpitkin.com

Another development application has been submitted for a downtown building in Aspen. Already five projects have been turned into the city in advance of tomorrow’s election when a change in the charter amendment could affect projects getting approval. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.    

Downtown landlord Mark Hunt is under contract to purchase the old Guido’s Swiss Inn, as well as the structure next to it, known as the Salmon building because of its color. Both are on the Cooper Avenue Mall.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The smells of legalization permeate up and down the valley, and the odor of marijuana has some people plugging their noses and complaining to city officials.

An investigation is brewing around a nonprofit in Glenwood and whether funds were misappropriated.

Meanwhile, there’s more debate on oil and gas drilling in the valley.

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