APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Aspen is in full swing with the World Cup finals hosting the best skiers in the world for five days. And there’s been some fast skiing, which means some gnarly crashes, too.

And it’s obvious that these athletes who are flying down the mountain at 80 miles per hour aren’t in it for the money. They do it because they love it.

80 years of ski racing history in 60 minutes

pintrest

Law enforcement officials are confirming that President Trump’s kids will be visiting Aspen beginning this weekend.

Ivanka, Donald Junior and Eric are expected, along with their children and dozens of secret service agents.

In recent weeks, the family and their representatives have been in contact with ski patrol and other local officials to set up the visit, which reportedly begins on Saturday.

Aspen has been reenergized this week as thousands of people watch the best skiers in the world fly down the World Cup course on Ajax. Speaking with News Director Carolyn Sackariason about the races, the sport itself and the buzz around town are Madeleine Osberger and Curtis Wackerle from the Aspen Daily News and Aspen Times columnist Roger Marolt.

You can hear more of the conversation, which includes Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m.

 

Basalt’s town council voted Tuesday to adopt a resolution, declaring the town a “safe harbor” for immigrants.

In 2016, 60 percent of Americans didn’t see the dentist. The problem gets worse in rural areas, and, if you’re poor, it gets even harder.

Courtesy of www.instagram.com/fisalpine

As temperatures rise into the sixties this week, World Cup officials are concerned about degrading course conditions. But so far, firm snow is holding, thanks in part to a variation of table salt.

www.instagram.com/jankylilj

  The FIS World Cup Finals are in Aspen for the first time ever this week, but for nearly 70 years, Aspen’s place among the international ski racing circuit has defined the world-renowned resort.

Indivisible Roaring Fork

One of the 4,500 or so groups organized in response to Trump’s election met this past Sunday in Carbondale.

FIS World Cup Finals are taking place all this week in Aspen.

Walter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, announced Tuesday that he  is resigning. He will leave his post at the end of the year. In January, he will permanently move to his native New Orleans to become a professor of the history department at Tulane University.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

It’s an idyllic scene out of a ski resort ad: After a long day skiing, return home and warm your bones by the roaring fire. Donnie Lee, general manager at the Gant, knows the appeal this has for visitors.

Courtesy of Protect Our Winters

Alongside the swag, food, and festivities at World Cup Village at Wagner Park, ski racers and fans alike will have a chance to take political action.

Aspen Public Radio

Eagle County’s Board of Commissioners met behind closed doors on Tuesday. One issue they discussed was  Tree Farm, a controversial development proposal in El Jebel.

The pool of candidates running for three open seats on Aspen City Council is now solidified — kind of.

Technically, six people are running for two open council seats, currently held by Art Daly and Ann Mullins, both of whom are seeking another term. Their challengers are former councilman Torre, current planning commissioner Skippy Mesirow and Aspen residents Ward Hauenstein and Sue Tatem.

Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen Skiing Company is running on all cylinders as the World Cup finals kick off this week. The company also recently released a sustainability report that details progress toward reducing its carbon footprint and working on environmental causes. News director Carolyn Sackariason sat down with environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy to talk about how SkiCo approaches events like World Cup and works toward large-scale change.

Marci Krivonen/Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County officials are digging deep to learn more about local impacts of climate change.

The Basalt Town Council is expected to vote on a resolution to become a “safe harbor” for immigrants.

Watching people's expressions as EcoFlight takes them up over majestic landscapes, especially of the American West, is what inspires them every day. The unique perspective from a small plane can give understanding to public lands. 

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

More than half a million people used Pitkin County’s public trail network in 2016.

One of Aspen’s newspapers has a new editor. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning is David Krause who has big plans for the Aspen Times.

 

You can hear more of the conversation, which includes some of the newest members of the team at Aspen Public Radio, at 3:30 p.m.

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