APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

From the archives, Annie Denver and Karmen Dopslaff from the John Denver Aspenglow Fund at the Aspen Community Foundation.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

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Creative Commons/Flickr/woodleywonderworks

School starts next week for students across the valley. The Roaring Fork School District operates schools in Basalt, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to superintendent Diana Sirko about how this year will be different than past years.

Diana Sirko is superintendent of schools for the Roaring Fork School District. This fall, the district may go to the voters for help in funding new school buildings and teacher housing. The school board will make a decision next week on whether to hold an election.

EcoFlight

The Pitkin County Commissioners are unhappy with what they’ve seen so far in a BLM plan for existing oil and gas leases on the Thompson Divide. They’re crafting a letter to the agency. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Pitkin County gets an early look at the BLM’s preliminary draft Environmental Impact Statement because it’s a cooperating agency. A public version will be released in November. It’ll decide what to do with more than two dozen undeveloped oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide, southwest of Carbondale. Pitkin County wants the leases canceled.

Residents  in the Holland Hills neighborhood are angry about the pot odor they say comes from greenhouses at High Valley Farms off Highway 82 near Basalt. The smell has been a problem for residents since the operation opened months ago.

Kids find new preschools after Woody Creek campus closes

Aug 18, 2015

  After 26 years, a rural preschool near Aspen has closed its doors. While preschools throughout the valley have long wait lists for kids to get in, the Community Preschool in Woody Creek saw declining enrollment and higher subsidies by the nonprofit that ran it. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason spoke with Skye Skinner, executive director of COMPASS, about what led to the closure.

 

 

That was Skye Skinner, executive director of COMPASS, which operated the preschool. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Frank Denis Chalk it up

Snowmass Village residents are generally happy with their quality of life and feel safe in town, according to results from a community survey.

This is the third time Snowmass has conducted such a survey. It’s like a report card for Town government, giving full and part time residents as well as visitors a chance to rate services, like transit and public safety.

Travis Elliot is with the Town of Snowmass. He helped get the word out about the survey.

Alec Soth is a renowned photographer who lives in Minnesota and traveled to the Anderson Ranch Arts Center to speak at the Summer Lecture Series. He discusses his work, his vulnerability as a photographer, and what inspires him. 

Visit www.AlecSoth.com to see Soth's work, and visit www.AndersonRanch.org to learn more about the Ranch's Summer Lecture Series. 

Courtesy Roaring Fork Transportation Authority

Sixty-nine new parking spaces are being created at the Carbondale Park and Ride, along with additional bike parking and restroom facilities for drivers and the public. RFTA facility director Mike Hermes says he hopes this will help fill a need, at least for a year or two.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Alice Henneman

The demand is high for local food in the Roaring Fork Valley, but there’s not enough available. Results from a six-month study show a need to increase local food production through supporting new and beginning farmers. Gwen Garcelon heads the Roaring Fork Food Policy Council, which initiated the analysis. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Gwen Garcelon is with the Roaring Fork Food Policy Council. 

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