APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Courtesy Aspen Valley Hospital

  A community conversation this evening encourages conversations about death and dying well before the tough decisions need to be made.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Dr. Melanie Armstrong teaches environmental policy and history at Western State Colorado University. She was in the Roaring Fork Valley last week as part of the Naturalist Nights environmental speaker series and sat down with Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.

Courtesy of the town of Carbondale

At their Tuesday meeting, the Carbondale Board of Trustees will discuss if they’ll officially allow people to drink alcohol in the street during First Fridays this summer.

Roni Morales explains how Mountain Family Health Centers plays a role in the recent immigration concerns in our valley. Garry Schalla highlights the non-profits team-based system. 

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

The rainbow flags of Aspen Gay Ski Week have come down, but they will be flying high again come summer.

Barbara Platts / Aspen Public Radio News

Those who want to run for Basalt and Carbondale’s Town Councils should have their signed petitions in to the town clerks by Monday at 5 p.m.

This week, The U.S. Forest Service accepted Aspen Skiing Company’s ideas for the future of Aspen Mountain.The plans include new terrain, expanded snowmaking, and more summer trails. This news comes as we learn that skier visits are down, not just in Aspen, but across the state. Snowmass Town Council is still grappling with questions about Base Village, and Pitkin County Open Space and Trails works on local food production.

Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management

Wilderness Workshop has joined a lawsuit challenging the drilling of more than a hundred natural gas wells near Paonia.


Aspen Public Radio

The day after Donald Trump became the 45th U.S. president, millions demonstrated around the world.

Christin Kay and Alycin Bektesh bring you the biggest stories from the week here in the Roaring Fork Valley.

We have a little bit of an animal theme this week. The Canada lynx was removed from the federal Endangered Species list. And, it may sound like a terrible idea to have wolves in an airport, but don’t worry, it’s just a photo exhibit, and it's actually part of a campaign to familiarize Coloradans with wolves.  

Photo from Flickr user, el-toro

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in a statement released Wednesday, said an old mine outside Minturn, a superfund site, could become the site of a future housing development.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The U.S. Forest Service has accepted Aspen Skiing Company’s long-term vision for Aspen Mountain. This means some changes could be imminent.

Marci Krivonen

  The Town of Snowmass Village currently does not allow business licenses for the sale of marijuana.

Aspen Public Radio

Last Friday, the board of Colorado Mountain College (CMC) unanimously passed a resolution in support of their DREAMer students who, the resolution states, deserve a pathway to citizenship.

Courtesy of Stay Aspen Snowmass

Not as many people stayed in hotels in Aspen and Snowmass this December, as compared to a year ago.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

This winter, the Rocky Mountain Wolf Project has launched public awareness campaign meant to familiarize Coloradans with wolves and garner enthusiasm for reintroducing wolves in the state. They’ve teamed up with the nonprofit Living with Wolves to bring a photo exhibition to a unique setting in Aspen.

Until recently, there was no place in the Roaring Fork Valley for an adult to get an examination after a sexual assault.  

Now, Mountain West SANE (Sexual Assualt Nurse Examiners) Alliance, which certifies nurses to perform those exams, has joined Riverbridge, a child advocacy center in Glenwood Springs, to provide this service.    

Currently, three options have been laid out for building a new chairlift on the west side of Aspen Mountain.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies/aspennature.org

Jasmine Finks has spent years rehabilitating injured osprey and educating people about the birds of prey. Finks was in Aspen last week as part of the Naturalist Nights speaker series and sat down with Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Residents and visitors to Pitkin County produce a lot of trash — about twice the national average. On Tuesday, county commissioners will consider a plan to keep some reusable items out of the landfill.