APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

This week on Cross Currents: Slow Money Harvest Weekend is coming up this weekend.


A new Colorado law gives elected officials across the state a pay hike. On Tuesday (9/15) the Pitkin County Commissioners discussed Senate Bill 288 and how it may impact their paychecks. 

The legislation was crafted as a way to tackle low pay for state executive officers, such as Colorado’s Secretary of State. With an annual salary of just over $68,000, that position’s pay ranks low nationally.


For years the Forest Service has been working to keep mine tailings from an abandoned silver mine from getting into Castle Creek. The long-defunct Hope Mine is tucked between the creek and Castle Creek Road. Work to return the area back to its natural state is now nearly complete. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Colorado is one of the only states in the country where it is illegal to collect the rain that falls on your roof.

Earlier this year, a bipartisan measure to allow rain barrels failed on the last day of the legislative session.

Jerry Sonnenberg (R – Sterling) opposed the bill, but now he’s proposing a new measure to allow rain barrels if providers make up for the water that would have gone into rivers and streams.

“My argument is that there is actually an impact,” says Sonnenberg. “ We have to recognize there is an impact. We have a prior appropriation system.”

Elise Thatcher

  State officials say a new “Bustang” bus connection to Denver is going well. The Colorado Department of Transportation, or CDOT, rolled out the uniquely named service in July, offering one round trip from Glenwood Springs to Denver each weekday. Tickets are $28 dollars one way.

Hunt has new project plans filed in City Hall

Sep 15, 2015

Developer Mark Hunt has submitted a plan to scrape and replace a downtown Aspen building. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

  The land use application seeks to demolish the current building on Hopkins Avenue and construct a new one that would be two stories tall, plus a basement. The maximum height of the building would be 28 feet.

Elise Thatcher

  Getting kids to play outside is a hot topic, and that also applies to youth living in the Roaring Fork Valley. Colorado’s wildlife agency is working to add archery to the list of options for kids and their P.E. teachers.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

The Rubey Park remodel project’s creeping Thanksgiving deadline is quickly approaching.

Creative Commons/Flickr/timlewisnm

The Aspen School District is holding a candidate forum Tuesday (9/15) to introduce the public to five people running for the school board. 

Two incumbents and three newcomers are vying for two open seats in the November election. The school board approves the district’s budget, helps establish an academic vision and aids in assessing student progress. 

Superintendent of Schools John Maloy says voters within school district boundaries can vote.

Julie Goldstein is the Board Chair of English in Action. She joined the organization in 2009 when she became a volunteer tutor. She shares her personal experiences in education and as a tutor, and examines the changing trends of immigrant communities in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Visit www.EnglishinAction.org to learn more about how you can become a volunteer tutor.