APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

rfta.com

  The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority will decide in September whether to approve an updated approach for preserving its rail corridor. RFTA’s Board of Directors had planned on voting on the matter this summer, but instead they’ll delay and spend more time addressing questions and concerns.

Facebook/Roaring Fork Conservancy

It’s hard to think of conserving water when rivers and streams are swollen with spring runoff...but, city of Aspen officials are mulling how to prepare for a drier future. 

Aspen is one of five communities involved in a regional water conservation effort. Organizers say the efficiency plan is the first of its kind in the state to encompass an entire watershed. Mark Fuller is executive director of the Ruedi Water and Power Authority.

"The idea is to reduce future municipal demands and it’s part of an overall watershed effort to increase streamflows," he says.

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

With summer season swinging into full gear, arts organizations in Aspen are hoping to attract more millennials. A new “Millennial Pass” includes discounts on tickets to the ballet and theater, events that typically appeal to an older audience. Getting young people interested isn’t just good for ticket sales, it’s an important step toward long-term viability. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Three taken to hospital after commercial raft flips

Jun 16, 2015

Three people were taken to the hospital and treated for hypothermia after the raft they were flipped in the Roaring Fork River. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

This summer the Aspen Science Center is offering a new program in conjunction with the Aspen Music Festival and School. The Science of Music is a four-part series of lectures and demonstrations. Alan Fletcher, President of the Aspen Music Festival and a board member of the science center, is leading the project. He gives listeners a sneak-peak into this exciting new series.   

If a major catastrophe were to happen in the mid or upper Roaring Fork Valley, emergency workers say they’re now better prepared to handle it. Wildfires and other dire circumstances often require a state team of emergency experts. Now, law enforcement, paramedics, and fire departments in the Valley are rebooting their own disaster management effort.

Elise Thatcher

A fire department in the Upper Valley says efforts this weekend to keep people out of high waters was successful.

Creative Commons/Flickr/North Charleston

A veterans center that opened in Carbondale’s Third Street Center a year ago is already looking for a new home. Though some vets have been helped with things like housing and employment, more vets may use it if it was in Glenwood Springs. That’s according to Michael Conniff. He’s with the Western Slope Veterans Coalition and spoke with Marci Krivonen.

Michael Conniff is with the Western Slope Veterans Association, an organization that’s looking for a new home in Glenwood for it’s veterans center. They hope to announce a new space in July. 

The Aspen Fire Protection District wants people to be careful around high water this weekend. They’re putting officials at popular recreation spots this weekend to warn visitors and locals of the danger. The Roaring Fork River is the highest Fire Chief Rick Balentine has seen for years, and he expects river levels next week to be high as well, as the snow continues to melt up high.

Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District

  The Carbondale and Rural Fire Protection District is gathering feedback about what residents want. And one of the key questions is whether voters still want a very high level of medical care when an ambulance shows up. Those details are important because the District probably will go to the voters and ask for more funding.

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