APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

An Aspen nightclub is the first of several local businesses to end its lawsuit against two firms that caused a 12-hour power outage last summer. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Marci Krivonen

Students at Aspen High School are ringing a bell in the school commons quite often this spring. The ringing signals the next step in the student’s journey toward college. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the tradition was started by college counselor Kathy Klug.

This is the week students begin to hear from the schools they applied to, according to college counselor Kathy Klug. When it’s good news, the students ring the silver bell near Klug’s office.

Aspen City Council is considering eliminating a longtime housing option for local workers. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

It’s called the “Accessory Dwelling Unit” program and it’s been around for decades. The idea was that wealthy homeowners would offset their development impacts by building a separate dwelling unit from the main house so a local worker could live there. But it’s a voluntary program and many of them remain empty. At Tuesday’s work session, City Councilman Adam Frisch told his colleagues that the program should be eliminated.

http://www.coloheadstart.org/programs/Eagle-County-School-District-Early-Childhood-Program

Eagle County’s Head Start released its annual report for families helped in 2014, showing that the program serves ten families in the El Jebel and Basalt area. Maggie Swonger is Early Head Start Manager for the county, which presented its latest report to Eagle County Commissioners this week.

On today's show, Shirley Tipton and Jim Salan from the Aspen Elks Lodge on the lodge's volunteer efforts with the Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic.

Also, Rob St. Mary with Laura Thielen and George Eldred from Aspen Film on this year's Shortsfest, April 7-12th.

Marci Krivonen

It’s that time of year...when the weather’s freeze-thaw pattern causes deep caverns to form on city streets and state highways. Potholes are ubiquitous almost everywhere but in the high country, the weather’s more extreme so the roads are ripe for ripping open. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s the morning rush hour on West Main Street in Aspen. Buses, cars and construction vehicles stream into town.

Reporter: "So this is the problem area?"

Marci Krivonen

After a dry start to the year, the month of March brought much needed moisture to the Aspen region. 

http://krabloonik.com/

The former owner of Krabloonik dog sledding kennel pleaded guilty on Tuesday to one count of animal cruelty. It was part of a plea deal with the District Attorney’s Office.

Dan MacEachen was originally charged with eight counts of animal cruelty. The misdemeanor counts came in December of 2013, when the DA’s office seized eight dogs from the Snowmass Village operation that MacEachen owned for 40 years.

Tomorrow starts ten days of construction that will impact Aspen drivers. Between April 1st and 10th, North Mill Street between Bleeker and Main will be closed to through traffic as several construction projects take place. Detours will be posted for drivers and parking restrictions will affect Bleeker, Aspen, and Spring Streets as well as Rio Grande Place and North Mill Street. Also tomorrow, the Colorado Department of Transportation plans to replace traffic signals at Main and Mill. Expect lane closures for that work during the day on Wednesday.

Roger Adams

At a recent debate, proponents and opponents of a ballot measure disagreed over how often Aspen City Council gives breaks to developers. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason looked into it and has this report.

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