APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Valley Roundup - July 5th, 2013

Jul 5, 2013

On the show this week Curtis Wackerle, Managing Editor of the Aspen Daily News (http://www.aspendailynews.com) joins us to discuss the top news stories in the Valley. 

We talk with Karl Isberg, Editor of the Pagosa Springs Sun (http://www.pagosasun.com/) about the huge West Fork Complex fire burning in southwest Colorado.

Reporter Greg Nickerson joins us from WyoFile (http://wyofile.com/) to talk about the recent annual meeting of the Wyoming Mining Association.  It was described by one participant as “like a funeral.”

The Senior Editor of the National Review (http://www.nationalreview.com,)  Ramesh Ponnuru was in town this week for Aspen Ideas and to talk with Pitkin County Republicans.  He speaks to us about rebuilding the GOP.

NPR has moved into its new building and already conservative critics are calling the studios extravagant and a waste of taxpayer money.  We ask NPR’s Marketing Director, Emma Carrasco, about the new digs.

On the Download Aspen Public Radio’s Digital Content Manager Rob St. Mary interviews Tony Fadell, designer of the iPod about his new creation; a smart (and good looking) thermostat.

Mountain Edition - July 4th, 2013

Jul 4, 2013

Aspen has a full city council again. Former council member Dwayne Romero has been selected to fill a vacancy created by the election of Mayor Steve Skadron.

Also returning this week are the mammoth and mastodon bones recovered in Old Snowmass. The fossils are on public display not far from where the animals died tens of thousands of years ago.

We talk with a biologist about tree killing insects and how they actually affect human health.

Our science reporter does what everyone’s mother says not to…look straight at the sun.

And we’ll hear about a work of art about the Colorado River that’s on display in downtown Chicago.

 

Romero wins city council seat, no dice needed

Jul 3, 2013
Rebecca Kruth

The Aspen City Council spent weeks narrowing down a pool of applicants to decide who will fill the seat left vacant by Mayor Steve Skadron. The council made its final decision this week, but it almost came down to a tie-breaking dice roll. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth reports.

One applicant is resting easy after a last minute change of heart lead the Aspen City Council to a consensus earlier today (Wed., 7-2-2013).

Former councilman Dwayne Romero says he’s “elated” by the council’s decision to appoint him to the vacant seat.

Wilderness Workshop's Artist in Wilderness Program

Trent Burkett is a sculptor and professor of art. He is currently Full Professor of Ceramics and Sculpture and Chair of the Department of Visual Art at University of the Pacific in Stockton, CA.
www.trent-burkett.com/

Mary Dominick is on the board of Wilderness Workshop and heads up the Artist in Wilderness program
www.wildernessworkshop.org/

 

Dwayne Romero has been selected by process of the Aspen City Council as the newest member. Romero fills the space vacated by the election of Steve Skadron to Mayor of Aspen.

In April, Romero spoke to us about his campaign for office, his ideas and plans, if elected.

The Aspen City Council is deadlocked in its decision on who should fill its remaining open seat. After whittling the choices down to four, city council members found themselves at odds at last night’s (Tues, 7-2-2013) special meeting. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth reports.

It could all come down to the roll of a die.

That is, if the deadlocked city council fails to reach a majority vote at another special meeting scheduled for later this morning.

A search for Carbondale resident Randy Udall continued this morning in the mountains of Western Wyoming. Udall set out on a solo backpacking trip in late June in the Wind River range. He was due out of the wilderness on June 26th. When he didn't show up, family members called authorities two days later.

Garmin International

More commercial truckers are navigating Independence Pass... even though they’re not supposed to. That’s according to the Colorado State Patrol. This summer, officers are doing more to bring those numbers down. And the effort comes as a worldwide GPS company is also trying to get the attention of more drivers.

When traveling east of Aspen on Highway 82, there are several signs warning drivers, saying:

“No trucks over thirty five feet in length can drive up and over Independence Pass.”

Mountain Edition - June 27th, 2013

Jun 27, 2013

In a matter of days, it’ll be illegal to give family or friends a gun... without having them getting a  background check. Today we’ll hear about confusion over details of the new transfer law.

That and other new Colorado laws have frustrated local enforcement officials--enough that they’ve filed a federal civil rights lawsuit. We’ll talk with a Roaring Fork Valley sheriff about why he signed on with that effort.

Our science reporter delves into the tricky question of how air quality is monitored... even when pollution is coming from hundreds of miles away.

A major group of wildfires continues to burn in southwestern Colorado. That’s as Stage One fire restrictions kick into place for parts of the Roaring Fork Valley. We’ll find out why many in Pitkin County are at risk if a wildfire does break out nearby.

We’ll take a tour of one of the most energy efficient houses in the world. Amory Lovins is Chief Scientist for Rocky Mountain Institute. He takes us on a tour of his Old Snowmass home... spoiler alert, it has bananas, too.

Kitty Boone, Director, Aspen Ideas Festival with a look at the public programs for this year's event.

Jonathan Bastian, former host of APR's Page by Page, currently with Louisville Public Media on his new role there and covering the Ideas Fest for public radio and TV in Kentucky.

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