APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Mike Simmons is the Chairman of the Aspen Science Center Board. He explains why hands-on experiments are the best way to educate and inspire people who are interested in science and learning about the world around them. Joining Simmons is Jackie Francis, the center's Executive Director. This week, we discuss the center's multitude of summer events for all ages and interests. 

Learn more about the Aspen Science Center's summer programs and events at www.AspenScienceCenter.org

roaringfork.org

There’s less water from the Roaring Fork River being diverted to the East Slope this spring and it’s increasing flood danger. Over the weekend, law enforcement in Aspen and Basalt monitored high flows. Wetter-than-normal conditions on the East Slope temporarily stopped diversions through the Twin Lakes tunnel. They’ll start up again later this month. Bill Linn is Assistant Police Chief in Aspen.

Marci Krivonen

With deep cuts from Washington in recent years, the White River National Forest is looking to free labor. Volunteers stationed at busy spots like the Maroon Bells scenic area, are becoming increasingly essential to the agency. And with summer arriving, officials are recruiting. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

In ten years the annual operating budget for the White River National Forest has been slashed by $2 million and the agency has reduced employees. Scott Fitzwilliams is Forest Supervisor.

Elise Thatcher

The Roaring Fork School District has added another new principal to the roster. Jennifer Ellsperman is taking over as Principal for Basalt Middle School. She previously taught fifth grade there, and most recently was assistant principal at Basalt Elementary School.

Voters on Tuesday chose a critic of city hall to fill a city council seat.

A review finds Glenwood’s Grand Avenue Bridge replacement doesn’t need an extra-detailed environmental review.

And, a funny looking bird is at the center of a debate about energy development.

There’s a housing shortage in the midvalley and some developers are trying to fix that.

snowmassclub.com

The Snowmass Club has announced it will submit a plan to town council requesting a redevelopment of its 217 acre property in Snowmass Village. The plan includes new residential and employee housing and a re-positioning of a portion of the Club’s land.

If approved, some land would be donated to the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, so the organization can expand their campus and increase parking. Nancy Wilhelms is Executive Director of Anderson Ranch. She says much needed student housing would be added.

The Schenck Family

  Teachers and students at Aspen’s Middle School are still adjusting to life without Kellie Schenck. She passed away on May 20th, at the age of 46, after a long battle with cancer. Schenck taught fifth grade for more than twenty years, inspiring a legion of students and fellow teachers. On Sunday, family and friends are holding a community celebration in her memory at the Benedict Music tent in Aspen. Principal Craig Rogers was a friend and colleague from the early years, and spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher.

Elise Thatcher

Today is a big day for a new Carbondale resident. The sculpture called “Sewing the Future,” is being dedicated. The twenty foot tall piece is planted in the middle of Carbondale’s new roundabout on Highway 133. Created by artist James Surls, it shows needles, a tree, and other elements arranged in a vase.

Marci Krivonen

All this week volunteers and staff at the Pitkin County Library have been boxing up books and hauling them to a new location. For the next several months, the library will operate out of the former Aspen Art Museum, or old power house. The move allows construction on the library building. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen caught up with head librarian Kathy Chandler mid-move.

aspenk12.net

The Aspen School District is hoping a change to its affordable housing rules will attract and retain more employees. Starting in August, school staff living in district rentals will only be allowed to live there five years. The school’s Employee Transitional Housing Program includes 43 units, mostly in Woody Creek and Snowmass Village.

The goal, says school superintendent John Maloy, is to provide more room for newly hired staff. He says last year, there was just one unit open for 27 new employees.

Pages