APR Local News

Local news from the Roaring Folk Valley

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Cyclists and runners along the Rio Grande Trail are seeing a different kind of wildlife this month. The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority has hired a herd of goats to eat weeds along the path from Glenwood Springs to Emma.

Dave Camara | Colorado Ski Country

Registration for the Colorado Ski Country USA’s 2016/2017 fifth and sixth Grade Passport Programs opened last week.

Today marks the start of the fall schedule for the Roaring Fork Valley Transportation Authority. This means that local valley bus services will reduce in frequency and will not run as late at night and on weekends.

Hubbard Cave outside of Glenwood has been closed to humans since 2010, and officials with the White River National Forest are proposing keeping it this way for the next three years. The move is an effort to prevent White Nose Syndrome, which has killed more than 6 million bats in the eastern United States.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Off season hits Aspen in full force beginning today and the traffic delays and closings are here to prove it.

In 1967 three local Aspen women, Joy Caudill, Dottie Fox, and Connie Harvey, came together with two goals: 1. to designate the Hunter-Fryingpan  Wilderness and Collegiate Peaks areas as wilderness, and 2. to double the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness area. 

Courtesy of Western Adventures, Inc.

The U.S. Forest Service released a draft decision to reissue a permit for Western Adventures to lead guided snowmobile tours on public land outside of Lenado.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Barbara Platts present a compilation of the week’s news.

Construction on Glenwood Spring’s Grand Avenue bridge will take a pause for the holiday weekend and then hit the ground running with a new phase of the project next week.

Construction on Glenwood Spring’s Grand Avenue bridge will take a pause for the holiday weekend and then hit the ground running with a new phase of the project next week.

Beginning Tuesday Sept. 6, the two-month “eighth street connection” phase of downtown Glenwood Spring’s $125 million road construction project will begin.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County commissioners are considering a ban on marijuana edibles but some officials think it isn’t a problem. Joining news director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Jeanne McGovern, editor of the Aspen Times Weekly, Chad Abraham, reporter for the Aspen Daily News, Andy Stone, columnist for the Aspen Times and Randy Essex, publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent.

You can hear more of the conversation which includes on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m. today.

 

Basalt’s town attorney acknowledges that it may look like he had a conflict of interest when representing his boss at a legal proceeding earlier this summer.

Tom Smith, who is contracted to legally represent the town and its citizens, appeared with Mayor Jacque Whitsitt when she was questioned during a criminal investigation by the District Attorney’s Office.

Aspen Public Radio obtained the audio of the July 1 interview with Fifth Judicial District Attorney Bruce Brown and his investigator:

Claims of a lack of transparency in Basalt town government has led to a surge of requests for public documents.

Town Clerk Pam Schilling has about a dozen requests by citizens and journalists for information filed under the Colorado Open Records Act. By law, she has three days to provide those public documents.

But because she is inundated with so many requests at once, she informed some individuals earlier this week that it’s going to take longer to assemble the public documents.

  Aspen’s historic preservation commission (HPC) is a volunteer board with a lot of power. The group reviews developments within designated historic districts in town. HPC makes the final call for many new buildings — even going against City Council recommendations.

Aspen Public Radio News

The Oklahoma Flats Trail, one of Aspen’s busiest commuter paths, reopens today with several improvements.

This week on Cross Currents is Weston Boyles of Rios to Rivers, a local non profit for cultural and environmental education.

After listening to a variety of comments from the public last night on how to develop a key piece of property along the Roaring Fork River, the Basalt Town Council agreed to scale its plans back.

  In a closed executive session on Monday, the Aspen Valley Hospital board of directors solidified a contract bringing Dave Ressler back in as chief executive officer.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Mule deer may seem ubiquitous in the Roaring Fork Valley, but Colorado Parks and Wildlife say numbers of the species are below its target in some key areas near Rifle. The state agency plans to kill mountain lions and bears in an effort to help grow the deer population.

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