State

Colorado state news and state government coverage. 

State and federal officials say it’s still too early to determine the scope of damages in the wake of Colorado’s devastating floods.

Bruce Finley - The Denver Post

In an effort to deliver up-to-the-minute information resources on how the recovery effort is progressing along the Front Range, how to help and how to find people affected by the flooding, we have created a list of live update links for you.

Aspen Public Radio will be updating this list of links as more resources come on-line. If you find something that we have missed, feel free to list it in the comments section below and we'll add it to the list.

Colorado remains under the spell of water. Steady rains Sunday hampered evacuation and rescue efforts and brought renewed warnings to a flood weary Front Range.

As flooding moves east across Colorado and rains are once again in the forecast, the recovery efforts continue.

For a second day flood waters, goaded by heavy rains, impacted large swaths of the Front Range. When skies finally broke, many were stranded, hundreds were in need of rescue and four lives were lost statewide.

As heavy rains brought wide ranging flood conditions across the state Thursday, the Front Range is bracing for more Friday.

Heavy rains have caused road closures, mudslides, power outages, gas leaks and more across Boulder County and along parts of the Front Range. We're following developments.

In two historic recall efforts, Democratic State Senators John Morse and Angela Giron lost their seats in the State Legislature Tuesday evening.

Two prominent Democratic state senators could lose their jobs after lawmakers passed sweeping gun control laws following the theater shooting in Auro, Colo., and the Newtown school shooting in Connecticut. Gun rights activists collected enough signatures to force the historic recall elections.

The recalls follow a combative and bitter legislative session. Among the most controversial measures passed were universal background checks and limiting high-capacity magazines to 15 rounds.

Roger Adams

Colorado’s elected leaders in Washington have differing opinions on whether to move forward with American-led missile strikes in Syria. President Obama wants Congressional backing before he approves of any military intervention. But, he may have to work hard to get some of Colorado’s delegation on board.

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