Luke Runyon http://aspenpublicradio.org en Industrial Hemp Could Take Root, If Legal Seeds Weren't So Scarce http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/industrial-hemp-could-take-root-if-legal-seeds-werent-so-scarce The most recent farm bill is allowing a handful of farmers across the country to put hemp, the nonpsychoactive cousin of marijuana, in the ground.<p>The bill allows small-scale experimentation with the plant. But despite the new law, many farmers say they're getting mixed messages from the federal government.<p>Jim Denny is one of more than 100 growers given the nod by the Colorado Department of Agriculture to start planting hemp seeds. On his farm in Brighton, Colo., just outside Denver, Denny is prepping for planting season. Wed, 28 May 2014 07:33:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 19148 at http://aspenpublicradio.org Industrial Hemp Could Take Root, If Legal Seeds Weren't So Scarce Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/marijuana-laced-treats-leave-colorado-jonesing-food-safety-rules Where there's pot, there's pot brownies. But how do you make sure those high-inducing sweets are safe to eat?<p>Colorado regulators are wrestling with that question now that the state has legalized recreational marijuana. From sodas and truffles to granola bars and butter, food products infused with THC – the chemical in marijuana that gives you a high — are already for sale.<p>The problem? Marijuana is still illegal under federal law. Sun, 02 Feb 2014 21:10:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 13717 at http://aspenpublicradio.org Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules The New Wheat Behind Whole Grain White Bread http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/new-wheat-behind-whole-grain-white-bread <img class="wysiwyg-asset-image-wrapper wide" data-caption="Food companies want to capitalize on the growing market of white bread fans who want to eat whole wheat. A new variety of wheat makes that easier." data-attribution="Credit Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/kunc/files/styles/placed_wide/public/201312/1219_Snowmass-bread.jpg" alt="" /><p>A new wheat variety may have cracked the code to marry the fluffiness of white bread with whole grain nutrition.<p> Mon, 23 Dec 2013 21:48:48 +0000 Luke Runyon & Harvest Public Media 12005 at http://aspenpublicradio.org The New Wheat Behind Whole Grain White Bread Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/forget-golf-courses-subdivisions-draw-residents-farms When you picture a housing development in the suburbs, you might imagine golf courses, swimming pools, rows of identical houses.<p>But now, there's a new model springing up across the country that taps into the local food movement: Farms — complete with livestock, vegetables and fruit trees — are serving as the latest suburban amenity.<p>It's called development-supported agriculture, a more intimate version of community-supported agriculture — a farm-share program commonly known as CSA. Tue, 17 Dec 2013 08:15:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 11693 at http://aspenpublicradio.org Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms Ranchers Wonder If U.S. Sheep Industry Has Bottomed Out http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/ranchers-worry-demand-sheep-declines Over the last 20 years, the number of sheep in the U.S. has plummeted by half. The sheep industry has actually been declining since the late 1940s, when it hit its peak.<p>The sharp drop in production has left ranchers to wonder, "When are we going to hit the bottom?"<p>Some sheep are raised for their wool, others primarily for food. Consumption of both products — lamb meat and wool — have been declining in the U.S.<p>If you look at the tags on clothes in your closet, chances are quite a few pieces will be blended with synthetic fibers: nylon, rayon and polyester. Mon, 21 Oct 2013 09:03:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 9124 at http://aspenpublicradio.org Ranchers Wonder If U.S. Sheep Industry Has Bottomed Out