football http://aspenpublicradio.org en Valley Roundup - January 31st, 2014 http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/valley-roundup-january-31st-2014 <p>Good afternoon and welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.</p><p>We are joined today by the Aspen Times’ Andy Stone and Aspen Daily News’ Curtis Wackerle. This&nbsp; Week, Garfield County officials said they are asking the state not to impose new air pollution standards on oil and gas drilling rigs in the county.</p><p>Aspen’s most famous downtown, Ukrainian, penthouse-owners have been told the city will no longer jump every time they complain about noise from bars and restaurants.</p><p>Now that marijuana is legal, the conversation about pot has shifted.&nbsp; One new topic is; how potheads should behave in public.</p><p>And on the Download with Rob St. Mary – Big snow goes viral.&nbsp; Also, break out the goldfish.&nbsp; It might be Superbowl 48 in some quarters, to others its Weed Bowl 1.&nbsp; Even Jello Biafra weighs in.</p><p>Its all on this week’s Valley Roundup.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 10px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Interstate, 'Lucida Grande', 'Lucida Sans Unicode', 'Lucida Sans', Garuda, Verdana, Tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 100; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: 22.399999618530273px; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> Fri, 31 Jan 2014 22:28:05 +0000 Roger Adams & Rob St. Mary 13657 at http://aspenpublicradio.org Valley Roundup - January 31st, 2014 Study: High School Athletes at High Elevations Suffer Fewer Concussions http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/study-high-school-athletes-high-elevations-suffer-fewer-concussions <p style="margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11.5pt; line-height: 1.5;">Researchers at the </span><a href="http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/PublicHealth/Pages/welcome.aspx" style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11.5pt; line-height: 1.5;">Colorado School of Public Health</a><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11.5pt; line-height: 1.5;"> have found high school athletes competing at higher elevations suffer fewer concussions than their sea-level counterparts. The reason: a phenomenon attributed to physiological changes in the brain that causes it to fit more snuggly in the skull. The results showed a 31 percent decrease in concussion rates among athletes playing at 600 feet above sea level, and higher. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci </span>Krivonen<span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11.5pt; line-height: 1.5;"> spoke with Dr. Dawn Comstock. She co-authored the study.</span></p><p></p><p> Tue, 10 Dec 2013 17:26:06 +0000 Marci Krivonen 11389 at http://aspenpublicradio.org Study: High School Athletes at High Elevations Suffer Fewer Concussions