News

Welcome to a Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Property tax revenue has plummeted in Garfield County as the natural gas industry has slowed down. As a result, the future of public services like libraries looks bleak. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning are Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent, and Roger Marolt and Andy Stone, columnists for the Aspen Times. You can hear more of the conversation, which includes Aspen Daily News Editor Curtis Wackerle, on Valley Roundup at 3...

Aspen Public Radio

In a report published last week, the state predicted teacher shortages will only get worse in the years to come.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Wyatt Orme present a compilation of the week’s news.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

State Sen. Kerry Donovan was in Aspen Dec. 2 to check in with her constituents ahead of the 2017 legislative session.

Glenwood Springs Police Department

On any given night in Glenwood Springs, police officer Levi Blount could deal with meth addicts or stop-sign-runners, and there’s a decent chance both will ask where’s he from.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Winter cyclists and pedestrians may soon have a wider sidewalk over Castle Creek Bridge as the City of Aspen tries out a snowy version of this past summer’s “living lab.”

Lawmakers on the joint budget committee have questions about how the state is managing wildlife programs and hunting and fishing permits.

Two members of Colorado’s Electoral College have filed a lawsuit in U.S. district court challenging the electoral college system and the way Colorado binds electors.

This week on Cross Currents, the Art Base has an opening Friday evening featuring Isa Catto's latest work.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Without snowmaking to fill in nature’s gaps, the chairlifts wouldn’t be running right now. And as Aspen Skiing Company taps area creeks to make it possible, it’s not without concern that it’s depleting natural resources.

Officials broke ground Tuesday in Basalt for the Roaring Fork Apartments. The project will provide affordable housing, unlike anything else in the valley.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Officials with the White River National Forest have proposed selling two pieces of land in El Jebel.

Humans triggered avalanches five days in a row this week, and the Department of Natural Resources is urging caution in the backcountry.

First Draft - Randa Jarrar

Dec 6, 2016

Randa Jarrar’s work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Utne Reader, Salon.com, Guernica, The Rumpus, The Oxford American, Ploughshares, Five Chapters , and others. Her first novel, A Map of Home was published in half a dozen languages & won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review. Her new book is called Him, Me, Muhammad Ali . In 2010 she was named one of the most gifted writers of Arab origin...

City of Aspen

After three years of back-and-forth on how to revamp and expand municipal offices in Aspen, the local government is getting ready to review its own land-use application.

Courtesy of www.climate-mayors.org

Aspen mayor Steve Skadron is showing that all politics is local, particularly when it comes to climate change. He and many other mayors across the country are hoping the president-elect will listen. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat down with Skadron last week to discuss the role that local governments will play in protecting the climate under the next administration.

Courtesy of aspennature.org

After the American wolf population was decimated to levels nearing extinction, there have been significant efforts in recent decades to help restore populations of both red and grey wolves. A lecture Tuesday looks at the future for wolves in Western Colorado.

Carbondale Arts Executive Director Amy Kimberly discusses the deep-rooted history of Carbondale Arts and how it has evolved from Carbondale's Mountain Fair into the multifaceted organization it is today. Board Chair Pam Rosenthal also contributes.

Now that cold temperatures have settled into the valley, motorists are letting their engines run longer. Carbondale has its eyes on this issue.

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