News

Pages

Environmental News
2:27 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

City of Aspen Meets Greenhouse Gas Goal 7 Years Early

Aspen city and environmental leaders celebrate the city achieving greenhouse gas reduction goals seven-years early on Wednesday.
Credit Rob St. Mary

The City of Aspen started the Canary Initiative in 2005 with an eye to trimming the city’s greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2020. The city announced Wednesday it met the goal seven-years early.

“Well, we found out this year, to our great celebration, was that we actually achieved our goal this year. So, the City of Aspen reduced our greenhouse gas emissions by 30.7%.  So, that’s a huge accomplishment.”

Read more
Basalt
10:50 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Basalt Town Council Votes to "Explore Options" proposed by Pan and Fork advocacy group

The Town of Basalt has been offering cash assistance to families being relocated from the Pan and Fork Mobile Home Park. An advocacy group says they'd prefer affordable housing in town.
Credit Marci Krivonen

Elected leaders in the Town of Basalt voted last night to explore alternative options for families being relocated from a trailer park. The Town has been offering cash assistance. But, a group called Workers for Justice and Diversity in Basalt says it’s not enough to pay Basalt’s high rent prices. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Read more
Environment
3:05 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

Helicopters Part of Annual Wildlife Count

Live mule deer captured with net-gunning.
Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife

Most hunting seasons are winding down, but things are just getting busy at the Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife. The agency is starting up its annual survey of animals across the state, which can require something called “net-gunning.” Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Division Spokesman Mike Porras.

 

 

Read more
Health
10:26 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Study: High School Athletes at High Elevations Suffer Fewer Concussions

A new study shows high school athletes, like football and ice hockey players, suffer fewer concussions at higher altitudes.
Credit Creative Commons/Flickr/U.S. Army

 

Researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health have found high school athletes competing at higher elevations suffer fewer concussions than their sea-level counterparts. The reason: a phenomenon attributed to physiological changes in the brain that causes it to fit more snuggly in the skull. The results showed a 31 percent decrease in concussion rates among athletes playing at 600 feet above sea level, and higher. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Dr. Dawn Comstock. She co-authored the study.

Read more
Opinion/Editorial
5:39 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

"What does the fox hear? Noise impacts and the importance of natural silence."

A fox hunting mice under the snow requires complete silence to listen for its prey. Wintertime noise from snowmobiles to jet engines overhead can make the difference between survival and an empty stomach.

A key rationale for conservation is protecting wildlife from the impacts of people. Some of those impacts are obvious, like cutting down trees or building a parking lot over a wetland. Some though are harder to understand or see, literally. A recent study from Boise State University caught my attention. In it researchers created a phantom ‘road’ along a mountainside in Idaho by attaching speakers to trees and playing the sounds of a hi-way into an otherwise pristine forest. 

Read more

Pages