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Non-Profit in the Spotlight
3:25 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Non-Profit in the Spotlight: The Manaus Fund, Part 1

"Never do for others what they can do for themselves". This is the underlying philosophy of The Manaus Fund and its founder, George Stranahan. The Manaus Fund operates out of Carbondale's Third Street Center and addresses localized social issues by investing in non-profit organizations and projects in the Roaring Fork Valley. Social entrepreneurship, investment and community involvement are the core values of The Manaus Fund and are essential to the Fund's latest endeavor: The Valley Settlement Project. George Stranahan, Founder of The Manaus Fund and Senior Advisor of the Valley Settlement Project, Ellen Freedman, Executive Director of The Manaus Fund, and Morgan Jacober, Project Director of the Valley Settlement Project are featured in this episode.

For more on The Manaus Fund: http://www.manausfund.org/

APR Local News
9:16 pm
Sun October 6, 2013

ETA for Amtrak Train Service Unknown; Busses Continue

Maria Troxler, right, and her friend Mildred Oliver wait for an Amtrak bus back to Denver. Both are from Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
Elise Thatcher

Officials are pushing to rebuild the Front Range after devastating floods That includes a direct line to the Roaring Fork Valley… a railroad line, that is. Tracks west of Denver were washed out-- and that means changes for Amtrak service to Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has more.

Reporter: Jeff Hershenson, who lives in Snowmass Village, is at the Glenwood Springs Amtrak station on a recent gorgeous fall day. He says the competitive fare prompted him to buy a ticket to Denver.

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Valley Roundup
3:32 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Valley Roundup - October 4th, 2013

APR Local News
4:35 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Cross-Cultural Cooking in El Jebel Results in Hundreds of Tamales

A group of women gathered in an El Jebel kitchen recently to make hundreds of tamales. It's for an event in Basalt called Fiesta de Tamales.
Credit Marci Krivonen

Tamales are a special kind of cuisine in Mexico. They fall into the category of comfort food and they’re often served for breakfast and dinner. Here, in the Roaring Fork Valley, Mexican families make tamales during special occasions, like birthdays. Recently, a group of Latina and Anglo women gathered in a fragrant kitchen to make hundreds of tamales. It’s a cross-cultural cooking experience and part of the preparation for an event called Fiesta de Tamales in Basalt. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

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Mountain Edition
3:49 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Mountain Edition - October 3rd, 2013

It’s been a big news week and one story with big impacts locally is the federal government shutdown. We take a look at what it means for the Roaring Fork Valley.

Obamacare hit the internet on Tuesday, turns out, health care plans coordinated by Colorado are way more expensive in mountain towns.

After massive floods walloped oil and gas operations, we hear ideas about making sure oil and gas operations are better protected down the road.

Local officials had to decide by Tuesday whether to take steps to allow retail marijuana in the Roaring Fork Valley. Many have decided to delay their verdict.

We get an update from one of the ten Aspen-area athletes hoping to compete in the upcoming Winter Olympics in Russia.

And finally, tamales are a humble Latin American dish with deep, historical roots. They’re the main fare at an upcoming Roaring Fork Valley event.

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