News

Residents in the town of Parachute, and other area communities, are angry and worried about a nearby hydrocarbon spill. That’s a word for a substance like light natural gas, that seeped out from a pipe valve earlier this year. Officials say there isn’t any more leaking out, and they feel like they’ve got a good handle on the clean up. But many at a public meeting on Monday, April 29th, were skeptical. Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher reports:

More details are available on what happened during the April 20th deadly avalanche on Loveland Pass. It was the worst accident of its kind in more than a half a century. The Colorado Avalanche Information Center released their final report on Wednesday April 24th. In it are some painful details--like the lone survivor waiting four hours to be dug out, and the slide being powerful enough to wreck car. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with CAIC Executive Director Ethan Greene.

Photo by Dale Atkins/RECCO

This week is a tough one for many in Colorado’s backcountry community. Friends and family are getting used to the idea that five men died in an avalanche near Loveland Pass last weekend. Its the worst event of its kind in Colorado in a half a century.

Adam Schmidt is editor in Chief at Snowboard Colorado Magazine. He was good friends with one of the victims, Gypsum resident Joe Timlin. Schmidt got the call Saturday night that Joe was gone, killed in the avalanche.

“My first reaction was disbelief. Um. I was hoping it was a terrible joke.”

Aspen Skiing Company

Business leaders, including more than a hundred ski resorts, want Washington to do something about climate change. That’s the message signed by business heavyweights like Nike and Starbucks, as well as Aspen Skiing Company and smaller outfits like Monarch Mountain. And it comes after athletes delivered a letter to the White House with a similar theme.

 

 

"Climate change is the biggest economic opportunity, and it’s the right thing to do."

Marci Krivonen

Last month the Obama Administration laid out a plan to help plants and animals deal with the impacts of climate change. Already, polar bears are losing sea ice and waterfowl are flying south weeks later than decades before. The plan lays out strategies on how to help animals survive these changes.

In Aspen, a group of citizen scientists hope to do the same thing. They’re getting trained on how to recognize and record changes to the environment. The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies is behind the effort. The group hopes to make it easier to track changes.

Photo Courtesy of USA Pro Challenge

Colorado sporting events may see more security after the bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15th. One of the biggest events in Aspen this summer is the USA Pro Challenge. The road bike race in its third year. Now, state and local officials are looking closely at whether to beef up security.

Photo by Elise Thatcher

Part 3 of a 3 part series.

Pitkin County residents are making less money than ten years ago. That’s one of the findings in a recent economic sustainability report released by the Aspen Chamber Resort Association. One of the reasons could be that paychecks aren’t keeping up with inflation. Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher reports.
 

Photo by Marci Krivoen

Part 2 of a 3 part series.

It’s tough to open and run a business in Aspen these days. New business owners must navigate a web of regulations and fees. And, stores already in operation are battling a tough economy nationally, and within the resort itself. Retail sales are a good indicator of a resort’s economic health. And, while sales data show Aspen has largely recovered from the recession, the retail sector has seen no real sales growth for six years.  Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen’s Economic Challenges: Part #1 - Lodging

Apr 15, 2013
Roger Adams

Part 1 of a 3 part series.

Residents of Aspen often hear and say that they live in paradise; it is a town like no other.  And yet, the Aspen of this description is facing challenges in coming years. That’s the conclusion of a report issued last week by the Aspen Chamber Resort Association.    ACRA’s Economic Sustainability Report revisits issues considered by a similar study done ten years ago.

Photo from John Fayhee

“When in doubt, go higher.” That’s the motto of the Mountain Gazette, the Colorado-born magazine that’s documented the slings and arrows of mountain living here and across the West.

Usually at the heart of the publication are long tales by the colorful and often curmudgeonly editor John Fayhee. He helped the resurrect the Gazette thirteen years ago. That was in collaboration with well known Aspen figure. Well, Fayhee’s in serious doubt... and deep regret... about the future of the magazine--so he’s saying goodbye. Fayhee recently spoke with Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher.

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