News

An inside view of a mountain "sweep"

Feb 23, 2015
Carolyn Sackariason

Ski patrollers on Aspen Mountain have many jobs but none may be as crucial as their last task: the final sweep of the ski area. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason joined one and filed this report.

Jeff Leahy is the head of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He talks about CRMS's longtime outdoor and classroom-based curriculum, the future of the education landscape, and how CRMS is looking to improve their programs. 

Learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School at www.crms.org

Daniel Shaw

From the Justice Snow’s website:

Justice Snow’s and The Woody Creek Community Center proudly announce the return of the Americana Music Series to Justice Snow’s Restaurant and Bar in downtown Aspen this February, extending into early March.

Marci Krivonen

The two largest public landowners in the Castle Creek Valley are gathering data to determine how to manage the area the future. The effort comes as the Forest Service and Pitkin County are seeing increased use of trails and roads. 

The entities are looking at the Castle Creek watershed from ridge to ridge, starting just past the urban growth boundary to the top of Pearl Pass and Taylor Pass.

The groups have seen a rise in use at spots like the Conundrum Hot Springs, American Lake and Cathedral Lake trails. Cindy Houben is Pitkin County’s Community Development Director.

Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority

  A subcontractor has been dropped from a complex lawsuit over an Aspen affordable housing development. A judge has approved the change, because of the subcontractor's settlement with Denver-based Shaw Construction. At issue is faulty siding at Burlingame Ranch, west of Aspen. The condo association there sued the maker of that siding. Then other companies were brought into the suit, like Shaw Construction, who in turn sued the subcontractor, Studmaster Framing Incorporated.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

Business is booming this winter season. Occupancy is up in local hotels and so is the average room rate - surpassing $500 a night.

Carbondale saw its first murder in 12 years and the murderer confessed to killing his wife while being airlifted to a hospital in Grand Junction.

The Aspen community continues to debate constitutional rights and excessive force after a teenager was taken to the ground and arrested for suspected marijuana possession.

Elise Thatcher

Memorial benches have been a long tradition in Aspen. But about a dozen that have been living in Galena Plaza now need a new home. The benches honor members of the community, whether they’re long time locals, part timers, or have otherwise spent time in Aspen. Thirteen benches need new homes because they’ll uprooted for a construction project on Galena Plaza.

Will Grandbois / Post Independent

Law enforcement has released the name of a woman who died in Carbondale earlier this week. Authorities say Maria Carminda Portillo-Amaya died on Monday. She was thirty years old, and the victim of a homicide. Portillo-Amaya’s name was released after her family worked with the Garfield County Coroner. There was also forensic testing for fingerprints, carried out by the Colorado Bureau of Investigation (CBI) and the Department of Homeland Security. The man suspected of killing the victim is still in a hospital in Grand Junction, receiving treatment for injuries sustained in a truck accident in Carbondale.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

After a brutal car accident, a Carbondale man confesses to killing his wife. A homicide investigation is underway.

An Aspen teenager appears in court after a controversial arrest.

And that arrest sheds light on a radio communication problem for law enforcement around the Aspen schools.

Rafting companies praise the idea of a national monument along the popular Arkansas River.

The City of Aspen starts cutting down trees to fix a leaky parking garage.

Kerry Donovan Campaign

Colorado State Senator Kerry Donovan will be in Aspen on Saturday talking about her time at the State Capitol, so far. The Freshman Democrat has gotten behind measures to aid rural economies and one to overturn a ban on larger gun magazines. I spoke with her yesterday.

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