News

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Residents in Glenwood Springs have elected a new city council. And with the new majority, expect changes afoot, especially as the issues on both ends of the valley become more connected.

Spring into spring with Bonedale Ballet

Apr 7, 2017
Courtesy of Coredination & Bonedale Ballet

This weekend, student dancers and professionals will take the stage at the Bonedale Ballet studio for a series of spring performances.

Fraud within Aspen’s affordable housing program has spurred debate about its merits in general. Speaking with News Director Carolyn Sackariason this morning on Valley Roundup are Aspen Times columnists Roger Marolt and Glenn Beaton, along with Aspen Daily News editor Curtis Wackerle.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service plans to burn up to 500 acres near Avalanche Creek today and this weekend, if the weather conditions allow.

Basalt Councilman Bernie Grauer made a curious request at the council meeting March 28.

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Wyatt Orme present a compilation of the week's news.

The Aspen City Council discussed building three new affordable apartment complexes during their work session this week. The conversation lasted three hours and touched on the differing interests involved.

According to his communications director, Sen. Cory Gardner will visit the Rifle airport next Tuesday to learn about cutting edge fire fighting technologies.

Dr. Carrie Hauser, President of Colorado Mountain College and Margaret Clement, Assistant Dean of instruction based on the Aspen campus, speaking about the 50th anniversary celebration planned for the Aspen Campus April 7.

 

Colorado lawmakers still have several significant and complicated bills to work on in the last five weeks of the session.

A proposal that would pave the way for driverless cars in Colorado cleared the House Tuesday with widespread support. Supporters said it will help Colorado prepare for new technology and automation.

Claire Woodcock/Aspen Public Radio News

Last night, Aspen Words veterans Stephanie Danler, Anna Noyes and Molly Prentiss spoke about their debut book releases. For those unable to make the Aspen Words event, Claire Woodcock spoke with the authors while they were in town to bring us this conversation.

Glenwood Springs’ election results are in. Voters want to tax pot and they chose three new council members. Around 5,000 ballots were sent out; a little more than 2,000 came back.

Local environmental watchdog Wilderness Workshop joins forces with the legal non-profit Earthjustice tonight for a discussion about how to safeguard public lands.

Courtesy of Aspen CORE

A local environmental nonprofit and the City of Aspen have been taking steps toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Artist Sonja Hinrichsen has been bringing attention to the issue with snowshoers in the valley through an environmental art project.

Aspen Film’s 26th annual Shortsfest kicks off on Tuesday. The 6-day festival offers drama, comedy, animation and documentary films that are all 40 minutes or less.

Courtesy of Betty Severy

Local law enforcement responded to at least three calls in the past week regarding traffic hangups as a result of wildlife on the roads — but in a new twist, these delays were caused by a turkey. The bird had been hanging around the median of Highway 82 between the Maroon Creek Bridge and the airport for over a week.

Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management

Last week, the Bureau of Land Management completed a long-debated land exchange with the billionaire Wexner family. The federal agency traded nearly 1,500 acres of land near the base of Mount Sopris for two properties totaling 670 acres of once-private land that is close to popular recreation areas in Carbondale. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following the development and spoke with producer Christin Kay about the deal.

 

Eagle County

Eagle County Commissioners meet Tuesday with the two men promoting a regional housing authority for the Roaring Fork Valley.

First Draft - Douglas Preston

Apr 3, 2017

Douglas Preston writes fiction, non-fiction and works as a journalist. He writes about archaeology, history and paleontology for the New Yorker magazine, as well as for Smithsonian, National Geographic, Harper's and the Atlantic. In the course of his journalistic profession Preston has explored lost temples in the jungles of Cambodia, been the first to enter a tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, and ridden on horseback across thousands of miles of the American Southwest-which earned him membership in the elite "Long Riders Guild.

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