News

Aspen Skiing Company is planning a makeover for the top of Aspen Mountain. Ski Co attracts summer visitors with mountaintop yoga, lunch and hiking, as well as concerts and other events. Now the company wants to do what it calls enhancements to the area, including making it more kid friendly.

“Phase 1 is going to consist of some Rocky Mountain flower gardens, picnic areas, new signage,” says Ski Co’s Assistant PR manager, Tucker Vest. “[As well as] kids play features such as hay bales, bean bag toss.”

Work has already started. In summers past there’s been a sharp contrast between the amenities of the Sundeck and uneven, bare ground nearby. Ski Co is planning a Phase 2 project, but what it will entail and when it is scheduled is not yet known.

There's no denying that dental health care is expensive - it's often overshadowed by other health care needs and expenses. Carrie Godes, board member of the Aspen to Parachute Dental Health Alliance, explains why so many people overlook oral care and how the Dental Alliance is working to bring affordable care options to the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Learn more about the Aspen to Parachute Dental Health Alliance at www.MyGreatTeeth.org

Elise Thatcher

The lease for Krabloonik Fine Dining and Dogsledding could be officially confirmed this week. Snowmass Town Council has approved most of the updated lease, but a few more details are being added in.

Roaring Fork Conservancy

  Cattle Creek has a problem. The stream crosses under Highway 82 at the Cattle Creek intersection southeast of Glenwood Springs, and there are signs it’s not healthy. Heather Lewin is Watershed Action Director with the Roaring Fork Conservancy. The organization recently started a study to figure out what’s wrong in the creek. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Heather Lewin.

City considers suing Precise over parking scam

May 11, 2015
Carolyn Sackariason

  Aspen’s multi-year parking scam may not be resolved. The city is considering suing to get back some of the money it lost. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Officials claim they were lied to by the company that sold them the pay stations. The city’s parking department thought the company, Precise Park, was flagging debit cards with zero balances when they were processed the end of each day. Randy Ready is assistant city manager.

Marci Krivonen

This month an art gallery in Aspen is filled with photos of mentors involved with the non profit Buddy Program. The “Men in Mentoring” installation is meant to get guys interested in becoming role models for a long wait-list of boys needing guidance. The need is particularly acute in the Mid-Valley. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Ryan Larkin and his pal Jacob drill screws into the lemonade stand they’re making. The two are decades apart in age, but work together like old friends.

Bobby Mason

May 10, 2015
Bobby Mason's Official Website

From the Bobby Mason website:

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

The City of Aspen municipal election made history this week, with voters stripping some power away from their elected officials. And, two candidates vying for an open council seat are headed to a runoff election in June.

A prominent downtown Aspen landlord is eyeing more properties and has two more under contract to buy.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen voters take a historic step, amending their city charter.

Voters also chose to keep their mayor and a city council member, but a runoff is likely to fill a second council seat.

A baseball field is named for the late Willard Clapper, a well-known Aspen community member.

Pitkin County is on the hunt for more 911 dispatchers.

And, Pitkin County has a plan for how to protect the popular North Star Preserve east of Aspen.

www.birchills.net

Reliable internet service in parts of Pitkin County is a problem officials have heard about from their constituents, and an overall broadband plan is getting closer to reality. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

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