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The Pitkin County Landfill started recycling textiles last fall, and now accepts those items at the Rio Grande Recycling Center. There are now collection bins for things like clothes, blankets, shoes, handbags and backpacks that would not be acceptable for resale at thrift shops.  

After five hours of review, Aspen City Council Monday passed three ordinances that will change the character of the city’s downtown core.

Courtesy of Emily Hornback/Western Colorado Congress

Citizens groups in Battlement Mesa are fighting an application to put an injection well near their drinking water supply.

Courtesy of Jeff Lukas

Communities across Colorado are working to understand how climate change might affect future water supplies. University of Colorado researcher Jeff Lukas will speak as part of the Naturalist Nights environmental speaker series this week. He told Elizabeth Stewart-Severy that the Roaring Fork Valley has seen fewer climate risks than elsewhere in the state.

Aspen Hall of Fame Board Member and Aspen native Lisa Hancock shares how she views the future of Aspen and the surrounding areas.   Founder and co-president Jeanette Darnauer and co-president David Gutherie discuss the future of the Aspen Hall of Fame. 

Glenwood Springs will pay a consulting firm, IBI Group, $50,000 to find ways improve Ride Glenwood, which doesn’t have enough riders and is too expensive to operate.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

A thousand people took to the streets and slopes on Saturday in Aspen as part of a nationwide show of solidarity. The group ski and march through town came on President Trump’s first day in office, in response to divisive campaign rhetoric.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County is five months into the construction of a whitewater park in Basalt. Crews with excavators and hand shovels are at work in the empty riverbed, below the surface water level.

Jennifer Smith is an immigration attorney in Glenwood Springs. For more than a decade, she’s helped immigrants from all around the world navigate the complexities of immigration law.

Welcome to a Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

  On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Elizabeth Stewart Severy present a compilation of the week’s news.

Law enforcement agencies and elected officials up and down the valley are looking at alternative ways to combat mental illness issues that are becoming public safety concerns. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning are Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent, Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor for the Aspen Daily News, and Roger Marolt and Andy Stone, both columnists for the Aspen Times.

You can hear more of the conversation on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m. today on Aspen Public Radio.

 

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

Now in its 40th year, Aspen Gay Ski week serves as an annual burst of LGBT pride on the ski slopes. It’s a time of celebration, dress-up and camaraderie. It’s a symbol of solidarity that attendees say is needed now as much as it ever was.

 

Donald Trump will give his inaugural address after being sworn in as president of the United States on Friday afternoon. NPR's politics team, with help from journalists across the newsroom, will be live-annotating his remarks.

Colorado’s new select committee on energy held its first hearing Thursday. As Bente Birkeland reports, Republicans created the committee to help handle the increased workload that could come from changes from the Trump administration.

 

courtesy of Women for Wild Lands

President-elect Trump takes the oath of office today, prompting several local groups to take to the streets — and slopes — tomorrow.

Colorado’s Department of Education reports the state’s graduation rate is the highest it’s been in four years. The dropout rate is also improving.

courtesy photo

Local philanthropist Dick Butera has resurrected a program to honor staff within the Aspen School District.

Courtesy of Pitkin County

The results are in from an environmental analysis of the proposed expansion of the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport. The public has a chance to learn more Thursday evening.

Mike Kosdrosky has been at the helm of the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority for two years. In that time, he’s realized that an overhaul of a system, which encompasses nearly 3,000 units, is long overdue.

 

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