News

Actor and director William H. Macy has just released his directorial debut, "Rudderless". He and his wife, actress Felicity Huffman, will be speaking & screening the film at Paepcke Auditorium on Saturday night as part of Aspen Film's summer season.

RUDDERLESS is a poignant musical drama about the power of a parent's love. Sam (Billy Crudup) is a former high-profile advertising executive whose life has been torn apart by the tragic death of his son. Off the grid, living on a docked sailboat, he drowns his pain in alcohol. When Sam discovers a box filled with his son's demo tapes and lyrics, his own child's musical talent is a revelation for him, a grieving father who felt he'd been absent from his son's life. Communing with his deceased son's dashed dreams, Sam learns each song and eventually musters the will to play one at a local bar. When Quentin, a young musician in the audience, is captivated by the song, the unlikely duo form a rock band that becomes surprisingly popular and changes both of their lives.

A searing performance from Billy Crudup leads an exemplary cast that includes Anton Yelchin as Quentin, plus Selena Gomez, Laurence Fishburne and Felicity Huffman. Casey Twenter and Jeff Robison's potent screenplay was the launching pad for Macy's auspicious debut as a feature film director.
 

High Notes, a series of free conversations with some of the performers and composers featured during the Festival’s 65th season, begins today at noon at Christ Episcopal Church. Aspen Music Festival President and CEO Alan Fletcher will offer an overview and point out highlights of this summer’s repertoire, and talk with members of the Boulder-based, internationally acclaimed Takacs Quartet as they preview their July 3rd and July 8th recitals.

At 6pm in the Benedict Music Tent, the Aspen Philharmonic conducted by Hugh Wolff performs the Brahms Tragic Overture, Beethoven’s thrilling 7th Symphony, and the lyrical 3rd Violin Concerto of Saint-Saens with 20 year old rising star, Aspen alum (and former star baseball player!) William Hagen as soloist.

Pianist and composer Stephen Hough will play works of German Romantics and his own Second Sonata tonight at 8:30pm in Harris Concert Hall.

Marci Krivonen

Governor John Hickenlooper says when it comes to legal marijuana, the future is still somewhat hazy in Colorado. Recreational pot became legal last year and retailers started selling it in January. Hickenlooper looked back yesterday on how the process has gone so far, in a talk at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The Dope on Pot: Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper and Katie Couric in Conversation

Recreational pot became legal in Colorado last year and retailers started selling it in January. While regulations were set up before retail sales started, the State of Colorado has enacted new laws to fine tune aspects of concern to lawmakers. Two new measures signed into law this spring included labeling for marijuana edibles as well as dosage regulations. Over the past seven months, the new marijuana industry is a tax revenue boon. It’s expected to bring in between $60-$80 million in taxes for Colorado in 2014.

John Hickenlooper, Katie Couric

Interview: Admiral Mike McConnell

Jul 1, 2014
James Fischer - BAH

Admiral Mike McConnell retired yesterday.  McConnell was Vice Chairman of Booz Allen Hamilton, the giant intelligence contractor for the U.S. Government.  Most people know it now as the company that employed Edward Snowden. 

In his long career Admiral McConnell also served as Director of National Intelligence under Presidents Bush and Obama.  He was director of the National Security Agency from 1992-1996.   McConnell was the top intelligence officer for General Colin Powell in the run-up to the Iraq war in 2003.  It was Powell who told President Bush before the invasion that, “If you break it you own it.” In an interview, McConnell said that what is happening now in Iraq validates Powell’s prediction.  McConnell is in town for the Aspen Ideas Festival at the Aspen Institute.  He spoke with APR's Roger Adams.

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