aspensciencecenter.org

When the Aspen City Council makes a decision tonight on who will occupy the old Powerhouse building, how much the tenant will pay in rent will not be a factor. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Who ever is chosen among the five finalists for the space on Mill Street will have to negotiate rent and other financial matters with city officials. The Aspen Art Museum paid the city just one dollar a year to occupy the space.

Assistant City Manager Barry Crook says the lease details were intentionally omitted from the selection process.

Jon Anderson

Mar 15, 2015
Jon Anderson Website

When Jon Anderson and some of his fellow Brits formed Yes some 45 years ago, they helped launch the genre of music that would become known as progressive rock. King Crimson, Genesis, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Rush, and others would soon follow, and all of these bands helped raise the level of musicianship in rock across the board. Yes went on to sell tens of millions of records—elaborate works filled with Anderson’s epic lyrical tales of mysterious worlds and forces, all backed by complex yet often melodic arrangements that the rock world had never before experienced. From 1969 to 1979 Yes released an incredible string of 11 albums, and Anderson fronted the band until 2008.

As a solo artist, Anderson has found the time and energy to release 13 albums over the years. Jon’s solo music is quieter and more spiritual than his work with Yes but no less powerful in its own way. He’ll be playing plenty of both at the Wheeler Opera House on Friday night.

More info on the show: http://www.wheeleroperahouse.com/events/detail/jon-anderson

More info on Jon Anderson: http://www.jonanderson.com/

Robert McDuffie

Mar 15, 2015
Robert McDuffie

Grammy nominated artist Robert McDuffie has appeared as soloist with most of the major orchestras of the world, including the New York and Los Angeles Philharmonics, the Chicago, San Francisco, National, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, St. Louis, Montreal, and Toronto Symphonies, the Philadelphia, Cleveland, Minnesota Orchestras, the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, the North German Radio Orchestra, the Düsseldorf Symphony, the Frankfurt Radio Orchestra, the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, the Hamburg Symphony, Orchestra del Teatro alla Scala, Santa Cecilia Orchestra of Rome, Venice Baroque Orchestra, Jerusalem Symphony, Orquesta Sinfonica Nacional de Mexico, Orquesta Sinfónica de Mineria, and all of the major orchestras of Australia.

He gave the World Premiere of Philip Glass’ Violin Concerto No. 2, “The American Four Seasons” a work written for Robert McDuffie with the Toronto Symphony. During the 2010–2011 season, McDuffie completed a 30-city U.S. tour with the Venice Baroque Orchestra, pairing the Glass Four Seasons with the Vivaldi Four Seasons. He has also played the Glass with the National Symphony of Mexico, the Düsseldorf Symphony, the Hamburg Ballet, the Nashville, Louisiana, San Diego, Dallas, San Antonio, and Colorado Symphonies, the Poznan Philharmonic of Poland, the Prague Philharmonia at the Prague Spring Festival, with the Scottish Ensemble in Glasgow, the Amsterdam Sinfonietta in Holland and Belgium, at the Belgrade Music Festival, and, paired with the Vivaldi Four Seasons, with the Zürich Chamber Orchestra at the Zürich Tonhalle.

Robert McDuffie is the founder of the Rome Chamber Music Festival. He was recently awarded the prestigious Premio Simpatia by the Mayor of Rome, in recognition of his contribution to the city’s cultural life. He served for 10 years on the board of directors of the Harlem School of the Arts in New York City where he was chairman of the artistic and education committee. Mr. McDuffie holds the Mansfield and Genelle Jennings Distinguished University Professor Chair at Mercer University in his hometown of Macon, Georgia. Robert McDuffie lives in New York with his wife and two children. He plays a 1735 Guarneri del Gesù violin, known as the “Ladenburg.”

Robert McDuffie Official Website: http://www.robertmcduffie.com/

Robert McDuffie Center for Strings at Mercer University: http://departments.mercer.edu/mcduffie/

Maria edits WLRN.org and oversees all its digital implications, including social-media activity and radio-to-web conceptualization.

She likes hyphenating adjectives and working on weekends.

After two days of emotional testimony, there’s still no sentence in the case of a woman who died while driving on Highway 133 last August. Defendant Christine Tinner, of Basalt, has pleaded guilty to careless driving, which led to the death of Indiana resident Meleyna Kistner. This morning, Tinner had what was described as an emotional breakdown, after particularly strong criticism during testimony from a member of Kistner’s family. That included allegations that Tinner intentionally caused the accident in order to commit suicide.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The City of Aspen just got the results of an audit of a multi-year parking scam. Elected officials wonder if they should look at other departments as closely.

After three months of analyzing and negotiating, the Roaring Fork School District finally inked contracts with its superintendent and assistant superintendent.

Stella Chávez is KERA’s education reporter/blogger. Her journalism roots run deep: She spent a decade and a half in newspapers – including seven years at The Dallas Morning News, where she covered education and won the Livingston Award for National Reporting, which is given annually to the best journalists across the country under age 35.

There has not been a sentence handed down yet for a Basalt woman charged with killing another driver. The sentencing hearing for the case is unusually long. Twenty-one year-old Indiana student Meleyna Kistner was on a road trip last August when she died on Highway 133. She and her boyfriend were on a sharp curve south of Carbondale, when they were struck by Christine Tinner, of Basalt. Tinner has pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors, both for careless driving.

Elise Thatcher

Planning officials with Snowmass Village have finished their review of the latest with Base Village. Developers are proposing changes to the project, which require another round of oversight. Commissioners finalized recommendations on Wednesday for key issues to keep in mind on the project,  as well as directives for what the applicant should do now.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

The current superintendent of schools for the Roaring Fork School District will stay on board. The decision comes after contention in the community.

Since the recession, Basalt has gained back low-paying jobs. A report details a tough scenario for home ownership.

Dozens of people went before Aspen City Council this week, weighing in on their favorite proposal to occupy the former Aspen Art Museum.

Tension remains between animal advocates and the new owners of Krabloonik Dog Sledding in Snowmass Village.

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