What Physics Teaches Us About Cells

Jun 19, 2013
Jim Gipe / Pivot Media

Physics is often introduced to young minds by teaching them to calculate the trajectory of a baseball or the time it took the apple to drop from the tree and bonk Newton on the head. But maybe kids should learn how to calculate the speed at which nutrients zoom around our bodies, or the force of proteins building and tearing-down structures inside of cells. Now, the fundamental toolbelt of physics is being applied to better understand diseases like Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's, according to physicist Jennifer Ross.

Lloyd Schwartz is the classical music critic for NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

In addition to his role on Fresh Air, Schwartz is the classical music editor of The Boston Phoenix. He is the co-editor of the Library of the America's Elizabeth Bishop: Poems, Prose, and Letters. He is also the author of three volumes of poems: These People, Goodnight, Gracie and Cairo Traffic. He's the editor of the centennial edition of Elizabeth Bishop's Prose, published by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux in 2011.

In 1994, Schwartz won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism. He is the Frederick S. Troy Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

April Fulton is a former editor with NPR's Science Desk and a contributor to The Salt, NPR's Food Blog.

The Great Firewall

Join us in a conversation that explores censorship in China: how censorship affects the literature produced there, authors in their work, and the types of stories we hear from abroad.

Panelists: James Fallows, Yiyun Li

Moderator: Melissa M. Long

Export Roaring Fork Valley

Jun 19, 2013
Creative Commons

Small businesses in the Roaring Fork Valley should consider exporting their goods and services as a way to expand their customer base.  That is the message of a workshop organized by Colorado Senator Michael Bennet later today in Glenwood Springs.  Bennett’s office is bringing federal and state export representatives to help local business owners in the process of selling overseas.  Aspen Public Radio’s Roger Adams has more.

mill56 - Flickr

The scientific community agrees: exercise does a body good. When comparing a sedentary lifestyle spent on the couch versus being an active cross-country skier, the recommendation from doctors is a no brainer: Go grab those skis! Which is a lesson Aspenites have long taken to heart. But a recent study from Sweden complicates the simplistic “exercise is good” mantra that we are used to hearing.

That's the sound of 15-thousand cross country skiers simultaneously embarking on a grueling 90 km course. This is the Vasaloppet in Sweden.

Courtesy: Rebecca Schild

A world-class climbing area near Rifle may reopen today. The Rifle Mountain Park has been closed for five days because of the nearby Ward Gulch fire. Now, the town’s Parks and Recreation Department says people may be able to return... but it all depends on the weather. 

Rifle Mountain Park has some of the best rock climbing in the country, and climbers from all over the world test their skills there. Everyone was evacuated last Friday, when the Ward Gulch fire got perilously close.  Tom Whitmore is Parks Director for the Town of Rifle.

Publishing Industry Insiders Tell All

For those who live outside of Manhattan, the publishing industry can seem byzantine at best. How does it all work--and are eBooks really changing everything? Industry pros will give the inside scoop around breakout books, landing an agent and the impact of today’s technology on what (and how!) we’ll be reading tomorrow.

Panelists: Kathleen Anderson, Rebecca Saletan, Victoria Skurnick

Moderator:  Cathy O'Connell


Courting the Muse

When inspiration strikes, writing can feel as easy as turning on the faucet. But what happens when the well runs dry? Writers share tips for quieting the inner critic and coaxing the muse back into the room.

Panelists: Nino Ricci, Pam Houston, David Mason

Moderator: Julie Comins Pickrell

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