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1:02am

Fri January 10, 2014
StoryCorps

Spalding Gray's Family Remembers A Man Who Was 'Never Boring'

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Kathleen Russo (right) and daughter Marissa Maier visited StoryCorps to remember Russo's late husband, writer Spalding Gray.
StoryCorps

It's been 10 years since the writer and monologist Spalding Gray went missing from his home in New York. Two months later, his body was found in the East River in an apparent suicide.

The day he disappeared, his wife, Kathleen Russo, was leaving for work when Gray told her, "OK, goodbye, Honey."

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1:01am

Fri January 10, 2014
Art & Design

Picture This: Illustrator Gets Inspired By The Morning News

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Maria Fabrizio

People don't often think of the news as a source of inspiration — and certainly not a source of daily inspiration. But that's what it's turned into for Maria Fabrizio, an illustrator based in Columbia, S.C.

For about a year, Fabrizio has been working on a project called Wordless News, in which she draws one image a day based on a story she hears or reads that morning. Starting Monday, she'll spend a week creating images inspired by what she hears on Morning Edition.

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1:00am

Fri January 10, 2014
Science

When Big Carnivores Go Down, Even Vegetarians Take The Hit

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Ask not for whom the wolf stalks ...
Holly Kuchera iStockphoto

Big, fierce animals — lions and tigers and bears, for example — are relatively scarce in nature. That's normal, because if you have too many, they'll eat themselves out of prey.

But top predators are now so rare that many are in danger of disappearing. That's creating ripple effects throughout the natural world that scientists are still trying to figure out.

What they're exploring is ecology — the interplay of animals and plants in nature. It's not rocket science. It's harder.

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1:00am

Fri January 10, 2014
Parallels

Despite Dim Prospects, Syrian Exodus To Germany Continues

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Syrian refugees arriving at the transit camp in Friedland, Germany, stand in line at the registration desk on Sept. 11. Germany has deported asylum seekers on the basis of an EU treaty that requires migrants seeking entry to Europe to be processed by the first EU country they arrive in. Many Syrians in Germany have come from other countries such as Bulgaria or Greece.
Swen Pfortner DPA/Landov

Human rights officials say the Syrian civil war is creating Europe's biggest refugee crisis in decades, but that countries across the continent are doing little about it.

Most European nations are refusing to take in Syrian refugees, choosing instead to send money to the United Nations and other international agencies. The few EU countries like Germany that are welcoming Syrians only offer refuge to a few thousand out of the more than 2 million Syrians who have fled their homeland.

But the cool reception isn't stopping Syrians from risking their lives to get to Europe.

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3:55pm

Thu January 9, 2014
Code Switch

White House Picks Choctaw Nation To Fight Poverty In Oklahoma

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:59 pm

Chief Gregory Pyle (left) and Assistant Chief Gary Batton stand in front of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's Capitol building in Tuskahoma, Okla.
Larissa Copeland Courtesy of Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Fifty years after President Lyndon Johnson declared his "War on Poverty," President Obama issued his own plan to combat poverty Thursday with the nation's first five "Promise Zones."

All "Promise Zones" will receive a competitive advantage when applying for federal grants, on-site support from federal officials, and, pending congressional approval, tax incentives for businesses hiring and investing in the community.

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