Carolyn Sackariason

News Director

Born and raised in the suburbs of Minneapolis, Carolyn Sackariason started her journalism career in 1995 as a reporter for a daily newspaper in Fairmont, Minnesota. After a short nine months of covering that small-town farming community, she jumped at the chance to move to the Roaring Fork Valley and become a reporter at the Aspen Daily News.

She eventually was promoted to editor and remained at the helm until she was tapped to be the publisher of the Snowmass Sun in 1999. Sackariason was there until 2001 when another opportunity presented itself. The owner of the Daily News and its former general manager asked her to come to Santa Monica, Calif., and start a daily newspaper there. She remains co-owner of the paper, which is now in its 13th year. She moved back to the valley in 2006 and worked briefly at The Aspen Times as a reporter and business editor. But independent journalism called her back to the Daily News, where she went through her second stint as editor in 2010.

This is her first foray in radio and took the job of news director of Aspen Public Radio in January 2015.

When she is not toiling away in the studio and on the beat, Sackariason spends her time on the mountains, hiking and skiing, and rafting the Colorado and Roaring Fork rivers in the summer, along with her daily morning golf rounds.

courtesy photo

  Elected leaders are considering increasing the secured area at the Aspen airport to handle large amounts of people trying to get through TSA.

Pitkin County

Pitkin County residents will be registering their cars and voting in a different location soon.

The Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder’s office is planning to move into three different locations next year so the annex building it currently occupies can be remodeled. County staff on Wednesday will ask the commissioners to approve three leases that combined will cost the county nearly $19,000 a month in rent. That’s almost a half a million dollars over the 2 years the departments will be in their temporary offices. That doesn’t factor in altering the new spaces. Janice Vos Caudill is Pitkin County’s clerk and recorder.

courtesy rendering

As the campaign heats up on Aspen’s this fall’s election about whether to approve or shoot down a 37-room lodge on Main Street, both sides are focusing on the issue of parking. The ballot question asks that city council’s approval of Base 2 be rescinded. That approval came with no obligation to provide parking on-site. But the developer has now agreed to build parking below the hotel in an effort to win over voters.

Carolyn Sackariason speaks with developer Mark Hunt and Ward Hauenstein, who led the citizen referendum to get question 2A on the city of Aspen ballot this fall.

This week on Valley Roundup:

  • A marijuana grow facility in the Holland Hills neighborhood was granted permission to continue operating as long as it keeps the stink under control.

A local committee will interview applicants today for the seat that will be vacated by Ninth Judicial District Court Judge Gail Nichols.

This week on Valley Roundup:

Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the week's top stories.

This week, the City expands corner hangouts, and the library renovation budget.

Elise Thatcher / Aspen Public Radio

Sherry Caloia, who heads up the Ninth Judicial District, would prefer nothing be given to the press or public until cases are completely resolved,

Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the week's top stories.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

 

A Snowmass Village town councilman is facing a felony charge for tearing apart the Pitkin County Jail after he was arrested for driving drunk.

A Snowmass Town Councilman will likely face a felony charge for damaging infrastructure in the county jail after he was arrested for driving drunk.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week. 

A news story about a missing Aspen native has created a  ruckus among longtime residents.

As summer sets in, so does the homeless population in Glenwood Springs, which is angst in the business community.

Meanwhile, a custody dispute involving a Snowmass Village father has garnered international attention.

When is a service dog a legitimate reason to take the pet into a restaurant or live in affordable housing?

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week. 

The question of whether the city of Aspen’s community development department wields too much power when it comes to handling building proposals and the land use code is being debated.

Memorial Day kicks off the week, and the Roaring Fork Valley gets walloped by a communications blackout.

Aspen city council still can’t decide on a proposed affordable lodge. There could be a midvalley collaboration to increase childcare and affordable housing.

Carbondale’s marijuana industry continues to expand, as the Roaring Fork School District hopes to bring down the number of kids using pot.

Aspen’s mayor gets back from Italy with a new sister city. We get the latest for this year’s wildfire outlook, and the Hope Center celebrates 5 years.

Elise Thatcher

CenturyLink is investigating who the perpetrator was that caused thousands of its Roaring Fork Valley customers to not have cellular, landline or internet service for more than 16 hours on Tuesday and Wednesday.  

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

A couple that lives in a penthouse in downtown Aspen now has to share the building’s entrance with their neighbors. As a result, their property value decreased $1.3 million, a judge has ruled.

There’s more debate around the live debate that Aspen Public Radio broadcast with city council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland.

Elise Thatcher

Aspen Public Radio held a live debate last night between Aspen City Council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland, who are battling it out in the spring runoff election. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this overview of what went down, and a full recording of the debate.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week. 

Aspen High School principal Kim Martin resigned after only three years on the job.

More complaints are surfacing about the proliferation of pot shops in family friendly Glenwood Springs weed.

Meanwhile, a major commercial development proposal for one of the last big open space in the valley has been pulled by the developer.

And, with summer comes traffic. Residents in the West End neighborhood of Aspen say keep it on Main Street and not on theirs.

The City of Aspen is finding itself with an extra $2 million every year from what’s called the real estate transfer tax, or RETT. And Aspen residents will have an opportunity in the coming months to weigh in on how to spend it. Then next year they’ll be asked to vote to renew the revenue stream and where it should be spent. Right now it’s dedicated to the Wheeler Opera House. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason talked with City Manager Steve Barwick about the possibilities.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

The City of Aspen municipal election made history this week, with voters stripping some power away from their elected officials. And, two candidates vying for an open council seat are headed to a runoff election in June.

A prominent downtown Aspen landlord is eyeing more properties and has two more under contract to buy.

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