Carolyn Sackariason

News Director

Born and raised in the suburbs of Minneapolis, Carolyn Sackariason started her journalism career in 1995 as a reporter for a daily newspaper in Fairmont, Minnesota. After a short nine months of covering that small-town farming community, she jumped at the chance to move to the Roaring Fork Valley and become a reporter at the Aspen Daily News.

She eventually was promoted to editor and remained at the helm until she was tapped to be the publisher of the Snowmass Sun in 1999. Sackariason was there until 2001 when another opportunity presented itself. The owner of the Daily News and its former general manager asked her to come to Santa Monica, Calif., and start a daily newspaper there. She remains co-owner of the paper, which is now in its 13th year. She moved back to the valley in 2006 and worked briefly at The Aspen Times as a reporter and business editor. But independent journalism called her back to the Daily News, where she went through her second stint as editor in 2010.

This is her first foray in radio and took the job of news director of Aspen Public Radio in January 2015.

When she is not toiling away in the studio and on the beat, Sackariason spends her time on the mountains, hiking and skiing, and rafting the Colorado and Roaring Fork rivers in the summer, along with her daily morning golf rounds.

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio

There are three seats open on Snowmass Village Town Council in this fall’s election, including the mayor’s post. Five candidates debated issues facing the resort town on Aspen Public Radio on Wednesday.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Campaign finance reports show that valley residents are collectively supporting their candidates in the tens of thousands of dollars. Joining Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason for Valley Roundup this morning are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Barbara Platts, Aspen Public Radio’s Barbara Platts, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent, and Glenn Beaton, columnist for the Aspen Times.

 

 

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Accusations of corruption in the Garfield County commissioner race surfaced this week, angering one of the candidates.

Garfield Commissioner Martin repaid $1,800 to county after auditDems to Martin: Quit or face indictment

As election day draws near, valley residents are hearing a lot from candidates running for local offices, as well as reading commentary on the opinion pages of the local newspapers.

A local nonprofit that’s been providing care and education to abandoned, orphaned and disabled children in Haiti for more than two decades is mobilizing in the wake of Hurricane Matthew. Robin Hamill, president of Haiti Children, spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason.

Courtesy of Garfield County Sheriff's Office

A Glenwood Springs man was arrested over the weekend on suspicion of killing a young woman.

Gustavo Olivo-Tellez, 27, was arrested on Saturday morning in Grand Junction by a SWAT team. He is accused of killing an unidentified 24-year-old woman the night before at the Pinon Pines apartments in Glenwood.

Police are calling the shooting “an extreme case of domestic violence.”

Olivo-Tellez was wanted on a previous Domestic Violence warrant. He has been charged with first degree murder following last night’s incident.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

A Basalt town council member violated open meeting law after she emailed her colleagues asking them to vote a particular way on a resolution coming before them. For commentary on this issue, John Colson, a reporter for the Sopris Sun, Curtis Wackerle, editor at the Aspen Daily News, and Jason Auslander, reporter for the Aspen Times join Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason.

You can hear more of the conversation on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m.

 

nobelprize.org

Three men who have been involved in the Aspen Center for Physics won the Nobel Prize this week.

Temperatures are dropping and snow is starting to fall in the Roaring Fork Valley. Aspenweather.net's Cory Gates has made his winter predictions and it looks like it will be better than last season. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason spoke with Gates about his winter outlook.

Governor John Hickenlooper has selected a new judge to serve in the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond.

 

The number two person in the Ninth Judicial District has been tapped to serve as a district court judge. Anne Norrdin, who has been in the DA’s office for more than eight years, will replace judge Daniel Petre, who retired last week. She will be based out of the Garfield County courthouse and will serve that county, as well Pitkin and Rio Blanco counties.

Wyatt Orme/Aspen Public Radio

Basalt Town Council voted unanimously last night to hire a public relations specialist. Jeanette Darnauer runs Darnauer Group Communications in Aspen.

She’s been working with the town government since September to improve communication with the public. However, her contract was a surprise to many, including some council members.

The contract is set at $10,000, plus out-of-pocket expenses, and ends Nov. 8, which is election day.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

The amount of health insurance options on the Western Slope is dwindling. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Curtis Wackerle, editor at the Aspen Daily News, Roger Marolt, columnist for the Aspen Times, and Ryan Hoffman, editor of the Rifle Citizen Telegram.

You can hear more of the conversation  on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m. today on Aspen Public Radio news.

 

Courtesy of Pitkin County

Pitkin County officials hosted an open house last night to present the latest iteration of conceptual plans for an expanded airport. Carolyn Sackariason has more.

 

www.rickcrandall.net

Authorities have suspended their search for climber David Cook after five days of ground and air searches in the Maroon Bells Wilderness Area.

Pitkin County commissioners decided Tuesday to spend $250,000 to build a turnaround area for oversized trucks heading up Independence Pass.

 

The turnaround will be located right before the winter closure gate on Highway 82. It’s part of a two-pronged approach aimed at preventing semi trucks and other vehicles longer than 35 feet from going over the narrow stretch.

Courtesy of Pitkin County

Transportation engineers are planning to significantly alter Highway 82 so that semi trucks and other over-sized vehicles cannot physically travel up Independence Pass.

 

 

Increased fines and road warnings to large truck drivers haven’t stopped them from heading over the pass. So, the latest proposal involves creating such a tight turning radius before the closure gate that over-length vehicles wouldn’t be able to go through.

The legal bills are mounting in the town of Basalt after a tumultuous year for the municipality.

 

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