Carolyn Sackariason

News Director

Born and raised in the suburbs of Minneapolis, Carolyn Sackariason started her journalism career in 1995 as a reporter for a daily newspaper in Fairmont, Minnesota. After a short nine months of covering that small-town farming community, she jumped at the chance to move to the Roaring Fork Valley and become a reporter at the Aspen Daily News.

She eventually was promoted to editor and remained at the helm until she was tapped to be the publisher of the Snowmass Sun in 1999. Sackariason was there until 2001 when another opportunity presented itself. The owner of the Daily News and its former general manager asked her to come to Santa Monica, Calif., and start a daily newspaper there. She remains co-owner of the paper, which is now in its 13th year. She moved back to the valley in 2006 and worked briefly at The Aspen Times as a reporter and business editor. But independent journalism called her back to the Daily News, where she went through her second stint as editor in 2010.

This is her first foray in radio and took the job of news director of Aspen Public Radio in January 2015.

When she is not toiling away in the studio and on the beat, Sackariason spends her time on the mountains, hiking and skiing, and rafting the Colorado and Roaring Fork rivers in the summer, along with her daily morning golf rounds.

 An all-day forum has been set for next week when participants plan to develop a proposal to restrict chain stores in downtown Aspen. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning are Wendle Whiting, columnist for the Aspen Daily News, Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News and Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent.

Carolyn Sackariason

The annual “toast to winter” celebration — known as Winterskol —  is underway in Aspen. And on Thursday night, it’s going to get extreme at the Wheeler Opera House.

 

Aspen Public Radio

A year-long moratorium on commercial development in downtown Aspen is expected to be lifted next month. But that won’t happen until city council passes new laws restricting developers. Council will consider them Monday night. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason spoke with Jessica Garrow, the city’s community development director, about how the landscape is changing.

 

Carolyn Sackariason

 Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Carolyn Sackariason

There was plenty of environmental news last year, including the Bureau of Land Management canceling 25 oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide and an earthquake in New Castle that’s being investigated to see if fracking had anything to do with it.

Carolyn Sackariason

Tucked away on the far east side of town is one of the largest commercial developments Aspen has seen in quite a while. The overhaul of the Aspen Club and the construction of a new wellness campus is an $80 million project. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason walked the site with club owner Michael Fox, who gives us this update.

Welcome to a Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Alycin Bektesh/Aspen Public Radio

It’s been a year full of news and local issues like transportation, development and politics dominated the headlines. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning are Curtis Wackerle and Madeleine Osberger, editors of the Aspen Daily News, Roger Marolt, columnist for the Aspen Times and Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent.

You can hear more of the conversation on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m. on Aspen Public Radio news, or at aspenpublicradio dot org.

 

Aspen Public Radio

A program to help sexual assault victims get adequate physical care in the tri-county area has been resurrected after four years.

One of the last efforts Sherry Caloia has made before she steps down as the district attorney for the Ninth Judicial District next month is re-establishing the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner — or SANE —program.

Carolyn Sackariason

Lifting a moratorium on development in downtown Aspen and dealing with the decades-old problem of bottleneck traffic coming into town are on the top of the to-do list for mayor Steve Skadron. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason caught up with him in the Silver Queen gondola to talk about what 2017 looks like for him and his constituents.

The Aspen Skiing Company and two firms closed on the sale of Snowmass Base Village Thursday.

 

Carolyn Sackariason

Aspen’s mayor is hoping to be re-elected in the spring.

 

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Welcome to a Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

The Aspen Institute is taking on an ambitious project — finding a solution to a decades-old problem. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning are Andy Stone, columnist for the Aspen Times, Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent, and Lauren Glendenning, editor of the Aspen Times.

You can hear more of the conversation on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m. today right here on Aspen Public Radio news.

As Aspen police officers increasingly respond to calls related to drugs and alcohol, homelessness and other mental health related issues, a new kind of policing has emerged. Elected officials recently signed off on a one hundred thousand dollar experiment to see if dedicating one highly trained officer helps in the field. Carolyn Sackariason spoke with Aspen Police Chief Richard Pryor about the new — and unprecedented — position he’s creating.  

As fallout from the presidential election continues, organizers of the Aspen Ideas Festival are pivoting. They want to make sure the issues facing the United States and the world are fully debated this upcoming summer.

Welcome to a Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Property tax revenue has plummeted in Garfield County as the natural gas industry has slowed down. As a result, the future of public services like libraries looks bleak.

City of Aspen

 After three years of back-and-forth on how to revamp and expand municipal offices in Aspen, the local government is getting ready to review its own land-use application.

 

Welcome to a Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

A group of locals, including two former mayors, are pushing elected leaders to ban chain stores in Aspen’s downtown core. They are afraid there won’t be anywhere to shop or eat for the average person. But there could be some serious unintended consequences for the commercial landscape and the local economy.

Pages