KAJX

Claire Woodcock

Arts and Culture Reporter

Claire Woodcock is an award-winning multimedia journalist from Upstate New York. She got her start at North Country Public Radio, where she spent nearly two years producing news and feature stories for the station's broadcast and digital platforms.

In 2015, she graduated from The State University of New York at Fredonia, earning her bachelor's degree in English with concentrations in Journalism, Audio/Radio Production and Gender Studies. That year she also worked as a congressional correspondent on Capitol Hill with Talk Radio News Service in Washington D.C., traveled through eight European countries with a Zoom H2N before relocating to Colorado in the fall of that year. 

Claire spent a year freelancing for podcasts and stations across the country and produced stories for KGNU Community Radio, Boulder Weekly and BolderBeat in Boulder, Colorado. She joined Aspen Public Radio and moved to the Roaring Fork Valley in early 2017 as the Edlis Neeson Arts and Culture Reporter and has since been recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists and featured on NPR's "All Things Considered."

Her stories can be heard on "Morning Edition" from Aspen Public Radio and the station's arts and culture show "Curated."

Ways to Connect

 

Welcome to the beginning of another colorful fall week in the Roaring Fork Valley!

 

Tuesday through Friday, The Wheeler Opera House will be hosting a series of events in commemoration of John Denver. For a complete events schedule, visit wheeleroperahouse.com.

 

Courtesy of The Wheeler Opera House

Max Langstaff has been a producer for The Beatles and John Denver. He joined arts reporter Claire Woodcock last week at Aspen Public Radio to discuss what it’s been like to work with his heroes.

Courtesy of Freeskier.com

This week, the annual The Meeting brings together leading content creators and strategists in the outdoor industry and beyond.

Claire Woodcock/Aspen Public Radio News

The Temporary had its soft opening in August. It’s the new interim space from The Arts Campus at Willits and is located in one of the warehouses on Market Street. So far, it’s brought art house film screenings, Front Range comedy acts and traveling musicians to its new fan base in the midvalley.

Aspen Skiing Company

This year’s Aspen Snowmass ski passes have a new look, designed by an owner of the Aspen Skiing Company.

Film: Lady Bird

Aspen Filmfest starts Tuesday. It's bringing 20 feature films and documentaries to big screens in Aspen and Carbondale through Sunday. 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

The board president of the Red Brick Council for the Arts, which manages the arts center on Hallam Street, sent a letter to its tenants Monday. It detailed why they’ve received little information regarding suspected embezzlement by the council’s former executive director.

Claire Woodcock/Aspen Public Radio News

An outdoor dance project out of Carbondale called “Letter to Congress: A WILD Sanity” advocates for the protection of public lands through movement. Now the group of artists intend on getting the film in the hands of our elected officials in Washington.

 

Welcome to the beginning of the first week of snow in the Roaring Fork Valley!
 

The 39th annual Aspen Filmfest kicks off Tuesday at The Wheeler Opera House, with screenings and panel discussions also occurring at the ISIS Theatre in Aspen and the Crystal Theatre in Carbondale through Sunday. For the complete schedule, visit aspenfilm.org.

 

This week's episode of Curated marks the 39th annual Aspen Filmfest. We’ll hear from an independent filmmaker trying to reach Congress through film and dance. We’ll also talk to Aspen Film’s director of programming for this week’s Aspen Filmfest. And we’ll hear from Susan Wrubel, Aspen Film’s new executive director.

Courtesy of Aspen Film

Jane Schoettle first came to Aspen in 2016 for the Academy Screenings. She is an international programmer for the Toronto International Film Festival and served as the director of programming for the 39th annual Aspen Filmfest, which starts Tuesday. Arts reporter Claire Woodcock spoke with her about her role as curator in a digital world.

Musical storyteller Spencer Bohren has been sharing the roots of American history - and music - with over 600 students this week from Carbondale to Aspen, and he's doing so through song.

Graphic: Aspen Art Museum

On Thursday, the Aspen Art Museum will host The Great Debate, a forum where presenters will confront one of the most fundamental questions of contemporary art.

Courtesy of Hooch Craft Cocktail Bar

Last Wednesday, Lindze Letherman noticed the first letter “O” on the sign of the bar she manages - Hooch - was missing. She said this isn’t the first time letters from the sign have been stolen.

This week on Curated, we take a tour of Owl Farm, longtime home of the late gonzo writer Hunter S. Thompson, in Woody Creek, Colorado. His widow Anita Thompson shares her plans to turn his home into a museum, and his friends recall the time he ran for Pitkin County Sheriff in 1970. 

 

Welcome to the beginning of a new fall in the Roaring Fork Valley!

 

Wednesday, blues funk band Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears will play Belly Up, Aspen with Lightnin Malcolm at 8:30 p.m.

 

Thursday in Carbondale, Studio for Arts and Works or SAW will have an open house starting at 5 p.m.

 

Claire Woodcock/Aspen Public Radio News

Last week, Colorado Creative Industries, a state division in the governor's Office of Economic Development, announced it's going with Paonia over Carbondale for the region’s Space to Create initiative.

Courtesy of Aspen Film

Aspen Film has named Susan Wrubel its new permanent executive director.

Jon Stahl

On Thursday, a big announcement was made regarding a statewide effort to bring more affordable housing to artists in rural mountain towns. Colorado Creative Industries has selected Paonia over Carbondale to receive money for the northwest region's initiative.

Claire Woodcock/Aspen Public Radio News

On Wednesday, the Carbondale Chamber’s Annual Business Conference brought roughly 60 locals together to discuss issues facing the region’s workforce.

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