Cornelia Carpenter

Development Associate

Cornelia was raised in Aspen and is happy to be home after attending the University of Denver, where she earned Bachelor degrees in both Geography and Studio Art. Since graduation, she has illustrated several children’s books and maps, and continues to draw and paint in her favorite medium, watercolor. Cornelia was a Development intern at The Aspen Institute in the summer of 2011 and returned to assist with major events at the Institute in the summer of 2012. During the winter season, she can be found cross-country skiing and working in her studio.

Aspen Public Radio has been an integral part of Cornelia’s life – from waking up to Morning Edition and local news in the valley to cooking dinner while tuned into Fresh Air. She enjoys listening to Car Talk, Science Friday, Wait, Wait...Don’t Tell Me, and too many others to count. Cornelia’s other interests include traveling, hiking, exploring the Wild West, and hanging out with exotic animals. Some of her memorable animal interactions include kissing a giraffe, holding a flying fox bat, and getting stung by a stingray.

Ways To Connect

Although the Aspen to Parachute Dental Health Alliance is young, they have a handful of successful projects that are helping to bring education, prevention and access to oral healthcare from Aspen to Parachute. Carrie Godes is a member of the Dental Alliance board of directors and works for Garfield County Public Health. She shares the organization's history and programs. 

Learn more about the Aspen to Parachute Dental Health Alliance at www.mygreatteeth.org

The Wilderness Land Trust grew from the small town of Aspen to the Western United States. In its 25-year history, the organization has turned thousands of acres of private inholdings into designated wilderness.  Executive Director Reid Haughey shares some of the organization's recent projects in California and their goals for the next 25 years. 

Learn more about The Wilderness Land Trust at www.wildernesslandtrust.org

The Wilderness Land Act was created 51 years ago in order to "establish a National Wilderness Preservation System for the permanent good for the whole people, and for other purposes"  (1964).  

Join Aspen Public Radio & Aspen Words for an evening of storytelling with Garrison Keillor

Wednesday, June 24, 2015 at the Doerr-Hosier Center in Aspen

Aspen Public Radio is excited to announce our partnership with Aspen Words for the Aspen Words Summer Soiree, featuring renowned public radio personality, Garrison Keillor. As the host of A Prairie Home Companion, Mr. Keillor is a skilled storyteller and exemplifies the mission of connecting people through the power of stories.

Jean Hocker has an extensive history in land conservation. She's the Chairman of the board of The Wilderness Land Trust and discusses the organization's current project of cleaning up The Painter Mine on Idaho's Salmon River. Hocker also shares the organization's challenges and goals. 

Twenty-five years ago, Jon Mulford, a lawyer from Aspen, was driven to start The Wilderness Land Trust after the purchase of a large private inholding, which the buyer intended to develop. The organization buys inholdings and sells the purchased land to the U.S. Government to be protected as wilderness. Since its founding in 1992, the organization has expanded from the Roaring Fork Valley to seven states in the Western U.S. 

Mulford discusses the history and progression of the organization. 

Meghan Hurley is the Mental Health Therapist at River Bridge Regional Center. She discuses her work with survivors of child abuse and how talk therapy can be the best method for healing. And Kerry Ach, the Community Outreach Coordinator, give details about Imagine 3, the organization's annual fundraiser on April 4th. 

Learn more about River Bridge at www.RiverBridgeRC.org, and Imagine 3 HERE

Scott Turner is the Assistant District Attorney of the Ninth Judicial District in Glenwood Springs. He works with River Bridge Regional Center on child abuse cases. In this episode, Turner talks about the challenges and rewards of his job, and Mental Health Therapist, Meghan Hurley, shares statistics on local cases and offenders.  

Learn more about River Bridge at www.RiverBridgeRC.org

Survivors of child abuse come to River Bridge after an allegation has been made, there's suspicion, or maybe they come years after an incident. The colorful little building is designed to make kids feels safe and give them the opportunity to share their stories and experiences. Kerry Ach is the Community Outreach Coordinator and Forensic Interviewer at River Bridge. She describes her job (both the rewards and the challenges).  

Blythe Chapman, the Executive Director of River Bridge Regional Center, discusses the center's history and importance in the Roaring Fork Valley Today. The nationally-accredited child advocacy center helps survivors of child abuse in Pitkin, Eagle, Garfield, and Rio Blanco counties. It is the only child advocacy center on the I-70 corridor between Denver and Grand  Junction. 

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