Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher is a reporter with Aspen Public Radio since 2013. 

Ways To Connect

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Schools in the Roaring Fork Valley get graded- some of the best and the worst in the state are here.

Basalt has its first menorah lighting to celebrate the beginning of Hannukah.

Aspen’s new Airport Director takes the helm as County Commissioners decide how to widen the airfield.

New owners at Krabloonik aim for a kinder, friendlier era and they are receiving a “thumbs up”, so far, from a group whose aim is to make sure the sled dogs are well cared for.

Elise Thatcher

The dogs at an embattled dog sledding operation have seen a lot of change in the last year. The owner of the Snowmass Village-based Krabloonik Fine Dining and Dogsledding was charged with animal cruelty in late 2013, and some dogs were seized. Others were adopted out. One constant has been new manager and now owner Danny Phillips and his wife Gina. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher took a tour and filed this report.   Editor's note: At the bottom of this article you can hear our interview with Voices for the Krabloonik Dogs, a group that's helped improve conditions for the sled dogs.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week the White River National Forest released an oil and gas plan. But, does that settle the matter on drilling in the Thompson Divide?

The City of Aspen continues to refine a new lodging incentives ordinance. At the same time, the council is asking the city management to give them better information.

The State of Colorado is not messing around when it comes to regulations and medical pot shops.

Could Aspen’s Little Annie’s return from the grave… again?

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Conservation groups are cheering an oil and gas plan that closes much of the Thompson Divide to future drilling.

Controversial changes like square footage and building height could be left out of new regulations for lodges in Aspen.

And, food scraps are being composted at some high-end Aspen hotels.

A statewide water plan is unveiled in Denver. And, the state capitol is getting a major upgrade.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Aspen City Council decides to take up lodging incentives again-- but much more cautiously.

Garfield County Commissioners suggest alternate routes for energy companies to reach leases on the contested Thompson Divide.

And the Glenwood Springs Police Department aims to crack down on people who don’t lock up their trash from bears.

The USA Pro Challenge announces Aspen will be included again in its route for 2015, only this time it won’t be the start.

Glenwood Springs Police Department

If you live in Glenwood Springs, and bear gets into your trash, the police will give you a warning. If it happens again, even a few times, you might get a small fine. But that could change after recommendations from the city’s Police Department. Officials are considering cracking down on people letting bears eat their garbage. The move comes after an unusually high amount of bear and trash problems in the last year. APR’s Elise Thatcher talks with Chief Terry Wilson.

Screenshot from GrassRoots TV/aspenpitkin.com

Small lodges could have a brighter future in Aspen. City Council decided Monday night to pursue ways to help them do small renovations and generally spruce things up. That’s part of a scaled down version of a lodging ordinance that’s moving forward. 

Screenshot from powder.com

There’s been a troubling problem with avalanche deaths in recent years... and now Powder Magazine and gear company  Black Diamond have joined forces to figure out what's going on. They’ve hired a freelance journalist to dig deep into what happened during certain accidents-- and what's being done to help backcountry travelers make better decisions when avoiding avalanches. APR's Elise Thatcher talks with writer David Page about the project, called "The Human Factor."

The Carbondale and Rural Fire Protection District is losing $600,000 a year from its savings account—and the District could run out completely by the end of 2016. That’s a dire situation for the service, whose firefighters put out blazes and respond to medical calls for a huge area. Now the Board of Directors is reviewing next year's $2.6 million dollar budget. APR’s Elise Thatcher talks with Chief Ron Leach about cuts and the upcoming master plan.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Mother Nature delivered enough snow recently to crank up the lifts on Aspen Mountain...for an early opening.

Some athletes are already skiing and riding. A new training venue opened at Aspen Highlands.

The Carbondale and Rural Fire Protection District is hammering out how much money to spend next year as it’s running out of cash.

A new sculpture goes up in the middle of Carbondale’s roundabout this week. We talk to the artist.

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