Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher is a reporter with Aspen Public Radio since 2013. 

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This past weekend added a new meaning to the phrase, “Winter X Games gold medalist.” More than fifty competitive video gamers battled it out for for those awards... and $50,000. That was at a tournament next to more traditional events like SuperPipe, but it had nothing to do with winter or snow. And it's part of ESPN's move to join forces with a gaming corporation and bring in more TV viewers. 

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The Winter X Games are once again in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley.

Officials try to shed light on a lack of childcare in our region.

A major landowner in Aspen is asking elected leaders for an extension for one of his development proposals.

Aspen’s Police Chief reports back from a statewide conference about pot and public safety

And a troubled Carbondale elementary school will need a new principal next year.

Officials in Garfield County get an update on an oil and gas study.

And doctors in Glenwood Springs are lending a hand with radon testing.

Aspen’s mayor heads to Washington.

And we stop by a long running nordic ski area in the Mid Valley.

Elise Thatcher

  The X Games have officially begun, with the Women’s Ski SuperPipe Final Wednesday night at Buttermilk. When it comes to new events, there will be a Special Olympics giant slalom race, as well as a gaming center where people attending the event can compete for prizes and their own X Games Medals. This weekend will also have a wider array of events for disabled athletes than in the past. Overall at least three Aspen-area hometown favorites will be gunning for gold. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher was at a press conference with the athletes yesterday, and files this report.

Elise Thatcher

Aspen Police Chief Richard Pryor started a recent day with his usual stroll into town. “I walked down Main Street today, instead of Hopkins Street, and along the seven hundred block of West Hopkins, I could smell the odor of marijuana plants somewhere in the area.” Chief Pryor chuckles at the thought. A little over a year ago, he would have followed his nose, started knocking on doors and asking questions. But with recreational marijuana legal in Colorado for the last year, Pryor made “a mental note of it, and moved on.” That’s just one of many changes for police departments across the state, and Pryor and other police chiefs recently gathered in Denver to compare notes. Pryor talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about marijuana and public health and safety.

Elise Thatcher

This winter, Garfield County is partnering with doctors to get people to test their homes for radon. The naturally occurring gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer, and nearly half of Garfield County homes have levels higher than what’s considered safe. 

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Aspen’s City Council decides to join the statewide switch to mail-in ballots, while City officials continue to review a handful of proposed hotels.

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority tries to make sure commuters have enough parking.

And Gay Ski Week kicks off in the Upper Valley with a mission to fundraise.

Residents in a Rifle mobile home park report diesel in their water.

Basalt police continue the search for a robbery suspect.

Aspen City Council dipped its collective toe into reviewing three major lodging proposals. Officials came closer to approving a fourth, calling it an example of how building should be done in Aspen. That’s after an hours long meeting at City Hall last night. 

Good afternoon and Happy New Year. Welcome to Mountain Edition.

The City of Aspen is looking ahead to a warmer future and planning around a changed climate.

An Aspen non-profit is introducing children to the science behind our winter landscape.

And as the snow flies, extensive snow removal operations are underway at the Aspen airport.

It’s one of the busiest times of the year at Aspen restaurants. We’ll take you to one that’s working to keep up.

Elise Thatcher

On any given day, there’s a stream of people hiking up the Aspen Skiing Company’s ski resorts, usually before making turns down. The physically demanding activity is part of a growing trend of uphilling, or hiking up ski areas instead of riding chairlifts. And it could expand further, as one of Aspen's elected leaders envisions an industry uphilling. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher hiked up the Tiehack section of Buttermilk, and files this story.

Elise Thatcher

Kids often learn about snow when they're sledding, skiing, or doing other activities in a wintry environment. But the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies takes it a step further. ACES aims to help young people understand a winter landscape more deeply-- like what snow crystals look like up close, and why they change. APR's Elise Thatcher attended a snow science class and files this report.

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