Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher is a reporter with Aspen Public Radio since 2013. 

Ways To Connect

Hamilton Pevec

Former Carbondale resident Hamilton Pevec is in the middle of the aid effort in Nepal. After the country’s second major earthquake, he and his wife, Devika, are going back out to villages where people are trying to recover. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Pevec.

Grayson Schaffer

Glenwood Springs is a contender for being one of Outside magazine’s best towns. Such listings can be music to the ears of town promoters, but can also increase the demand for local resources, like housing. As Aspen Public Radio is reporting this month, the lack of rental housing in the Roaring Fork Valley is having a significant effect on locals. Jonah Ogles is Senior Editor with Outside Magazine, and talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. He says Outside often gets criticism for listing communities as desirable.

Joleen Cohen

Finding decent housing in Aspen and parts of the Roaring Fork Valley has always been difficult. But the increasing shortage in rentals, especially in the Mid-Valley, is having a significant impact on residents. In the first in our series about housing in the Valley, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story.

Elise Thatcher

The lease for Krabloonik Fine Dining and Dogsledding could be officially confirmed this week. Snowmass Town Council has approved most of the updated lease, but a few more details are being added in.

Roaring Fork Conservancy

  Cattle Creek has a problem. The stream crosses under Highway 82 at the Cattle Creek intersection southeast of Glenwood Springs, and there are signs it’s not healthy. Heather Lewin is Watershed Action Director with the Roaring Fork Conservancy. The organization recently started a study to figure out what’s wrong in the creek. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Heather Lewin.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen voters take a historic step, amending their city charter.

Voters also chose to keep their mayor and a city council member, but a runoff is likely to fill a second council seat.

A baseball field is named for the late Willard Clapper, a well-known Aspen community member.

Pitkin County is on the hunt for more 911 dispatchers.

And, Pitkin County has a plan for how to protect the popular North Star Preserve east of Aspen.

Elise Thatcher

Two Aspen political allies will have to definitely battle it out for a City Council seat. Longtime political servant Mick Ireland and grassroots organizer Bert Myrin will face off in June for a four year city council seat. Neither got enough votes in the spring election to land the post outright.

Hamilton Pevec

Residents of the Roaring Fork Valley have been eager to help out with earthquake relief efforts in Nepal. One effort has raised more than $38,000. Some of that money is going toward a micro aid effort in the Himalayan country. Carbondale native Hamilton Pevec and his Nepali wife Devika live near the epicenter of quake, and are working with friends to deliver food and shelter to villages that were hit the hardest. Pevec's group has encountered a troubling trend, also highlighted by Nepali and international news reports. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Pevec.

Elise Thatcher

There’s no answer yet on whether Aspen will have a runoff election in June. Election officials have until this evening to figure out whether twenty-three ballots are valid. They’ve already confirmed that three qualify to be counted.

Elise Thatcher

History was made last night when the majority of Aspenites changed the city’s home rule charter, stripping power away from elected officials. Referendum 1, also known as “Keep Aspen, Aspen” passed by a slim margin of 53% to 47%. The ballot count came in at 1297 to 1141 votes Tuesday night.

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