Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher is a reporter with Aspen Public Radio since 2013. 

Ways To Connect

Elise Thatcher

A suicide prevention organization is unveiling a new campaign tonight. The Hope Center, now based in Basalt, is also hosting an expert on healing communities.  Michelle Muething is Executive Director of the small nonprofit, which offers a hotline and counseling for people with suicidal thoughts. Muething says the new effort is called the "Erase the Stigma" campaign, and it’s based on feedback gathered since last spring.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition. Wintry weather descends on the Roaring Fork Valley this week closing Independence Pass and prompting locals to break out their cold weather gear. Two Roaring Fork Valley residents are renamed to the U.S. Ski Team. Aspen holds its annual Veterans Day service. The Forest Service highlights crowds over-loving backcountry spots, big employers move forward with a plan to make their workers healthier, and politicians in Denver put their ducks in a row after a surprising election.

Getting your blood checked can mean making an appointment, getting to a doctor’s office, and fees. But for older folks in Pitkin County, regular senior health fairs make it much easier. They’re part of a wider variety of fairs put on by Aspen Valley Hospital, which hosted one on a recent Friday.

Five employers efforts to improve health care and lower insurance costs is shifting into high gear. The group, known as the Valley Health Alliance, has a new Director and was part of a forum yesterday. Details on what the Alliance may try in the next year were discussed-- and mental health will be at the top of the list.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

This week’s elections saw high drama and voting problems in Pitkin County.

Colorado’s governor’s race wasn’t decided until the morning after Election Day and a State Senate race took far longer than usual to know who won and who lost.

The Roaring Fork Valley approves money for ambulances, more pot taxes, and other measures while re-electing all of its sitting state house representatives.

We’ll find out what it was like being in the center of the election excitement in Denver.

And take some time to hear about the latest on kids and immigration.

Elise Thatcher

The results are not final for Colorado’s governor’s race, but experts say Governor John Hickenlooper likely will be re-elected. In the Roaring Fork Valley, delays and glitches made for late night vote counting for Pitkin County election workers. As of this morning, results indicate Democrat Patti Clapper has won the race for Pitkin County Commissioner District 1. It’s not clear yet who has won a state senate race. For Senate District 5, at last count Democrat Kerry Donovan has a one percent lead over Republican Don Suppes.  

Elise Thatcher

Each county in the Roaring Fork Valley has places where resident citizens can register to vote and fill out a ballot…. as long as it’s before polls close at 7pm. Here’s a list of those locations in Garfield, Eagle, and Pitkin Counties.

Elise Thatcher

  Tomorrow is election day and polls will open at 7am in the Roaring Fork Valley and across the nation. Because of early voting and mail-in ballots, more than a million Coloradans have already cast their ballots.

Elise Thatcher

If someone has a heart attack-- or breaks a leg-- in the Aspen area, there’s a small fleet of ambulances ready to pick them up. Even if the  person is up a dirt road near Independence Pass or on top of Aspen Mountain. But there’s a key part of that access that’s becoming a big problem. And the ambulance district is asking for a half million dollar budget increase to pay for it.

peggytibbetts.net

Many fractivists across Colorado felt deeply betrayed by Governor John Hickenlooper this summer, when he announced a grand bargain over fracking. After meeting with members of the oil and gas industry and environmental groups, everyone agreed to drop ballot measures for and against drilling… instead agreeing to a statewide task force. Now fractivists are faced with a tough choice in the upcoming election. The gubernatorial race has turned razor thin, and they must decide whether to vote for Hickenlooper, or accept a more drilling friendly Republican administration.

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