Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher joined Aspen Public Radio in 2013. Previously she worked as a freelancer, covering Southwestern Colorado, as well as with Colorado Public Radio, National Public Radio, KBOO Portland, and KWCW Whitman College. Elise is an award-winning journalist who relishes digging deep into complex issues, as well as covering day to day stories. When away from the microphone, she enjoys rock climbing, mountain biking, backcountry skiing, and other outdoor opportunities.

Ways to Connect

Rifle Citizen Telegram/Post Independent

  Voters in Parachute have decided to keep Town Trustees who support growing marijuana businesses in town. The spring election ended Tuesday with a record turnout of more than two hundred ballots turned in.

The Brenninger Family

  Family and friends are planning to honor Hansi Brenninger at a gathering next week. A celebration of life is planned for next Friday, April 15th.

Elise Thatcher

  Basalt voters have given Mayor Jacque Whitsitt another term, and three new council members will be sworn in. In Carbondale, residents turned down two tax measures and also chose new local representatives.

American Museum of Natural History/Rob Moyle

Researcher Chris Filardi loves birds and he’s spent decades studying them in the Solomon Islands. Filardi is director of Pacific Programs at the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Kelley Brenninger/Facebook

The Aspen Mountain Ski and Snowboard School is shaken after the death of longtime instructor Hansi Brenninger.

Elise Thatcher

Voters in Carbondale and Basalt are casting their ballots for the spring election, which ends Tuesday evening. Proponents of a new tax have raised-- and spent-- the most campaign dollars in Carbondale. In Basalt, that’s true of candidates for the mayor’s seat.

Elise Thatcher

  Mountain Family joins four of the biggest employers in the Aspen area, which created the Valley Health Alliance to help workers get healthier and save money for employees and employers.

This week, on Mountain Edition:

  • Booze - specifically local booze - is a hit in the Valley

  • Carbondale voters will weigh in on a pair of tax measures this election

Carbondale Police Department

  Serious crime has gone up in Carbondale over the last year and a half, including the armed robbery at a retail store earlier this week.

  Carbondale voters are considering increasing taxes. One would allow property taxes to go up to help pay for capital costs — like sidewalks and roads. The other would tax electricity and natural gas use. As Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher reports, the energy tax is modeled closely on a similar one in Boulder.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

After Tuesday’s attack in Belgium, there’s extra law enforcement at the Aspen airport.

 

The Basalt spring election keeps getting hotter.

The city of Aspen needs help deciding how to use a 400-acre public parcel.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

  The Colorado Attorney General’s Office says Glenwood Springs doctor Frederick Oakes has repaid $16,006.32 to a state agency, after an investigation revealed the doctor had filed for extra Medicaid payments.

Elise Thatcher

Basalt Town Council has voted unanimously to give elected officials a pay raise. The change goes into effect this spring, for about half of the board.

Elise Thatcher

  Water managers are planning to send extra water from Ruedi Reservoir downstream this summer and fall. That’s to help out fish species in the Colorado River, but the effort is once again raising concerns.

Elise Thatcher

The Basalt election keeps getting hotter. With two weeks until the end, voters have been dropping off ballots at Town Hall, and controversy over yard signs continues.

Elise Thatcher

Basalt is choosing from a list of four companies that want to build the town’s long-anticipated underpass.

Marci Krivonen

There’s growing concern in Carbondale about a concentration of marijuana businesses in one neighborhood. Sixteen pot-related operations are grouped in the Buggy Village area near Highway 133.

Barbara Platts

Three Town Council seats are up for grabs in Basalt’s spring election, and the mayor’s post is also in contention. Aspen Public Radio hosted a candidate forum last night at the Basalt Regional Library. Candidates staked out their positions and answered pointed questions.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen City Council puts the brakes on development downtown.

Aspen Film announces the ShortsFest lineup.

The Roaring Fork Fishing Guide Alliance/Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife

It’s common to have stream closures this time of year — near the Roaring Fork and Colorado rivers. That’s to protect fish, and now there’s a new effort to make sure people follow the rules.

The idea is to protect spawning trout, which congregate in certain places upstream from the Roaring Fork and Colorado rivers. Fishing during spawning stresses out the trout, making it easier for them to die.

The closures mean no fishing and a new set of signs are alerting anglers to the restrictions. The postings are part of a collaboration by the Roaring Fork Fishing Guide Alliance and the Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife.

Four streams in the Roaring Fork Valley area are affected by the closures. Those are Grizzly and No Name creeks, as tributaries to the Colorado River, and Three-Mile and Four-Mile creeks, as tributaries to the Roaring Fork River. The closures affect a half a mile on each creek.

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