Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher joined Aspen Public Radio in 2013. Previously she worked as a freelancer, covering Southwestern Colorado, as well as with Colorado Public Radio, National Public Radio, KBOO Portland, and KWCW Whitman College. Elise is an award-winning journalist who relishes digging deep into complex issues, as well as covering day to day stories. When away from the microphone, she enjoys rock climbing, mountain biking, backcountry skiing, and other outdoor opportunities.

Ways to Connect

  There’s more information now about a recently released document concerning Aspen’s affordable housing program. It’s come to light that the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority has lost much of its power to the Aspen City Manager’s office.

Elise Thatcher

  Schools and daycare centers in the Roaring Fork Valley are getting ready for tighter  state rules around vaccines. Colorado’s Health Department will soon beef up how often parents must confirm their child is not vaccinated. The changes come because of Colorado’s lower vaccination rate and events like the mini measles outbreak this winter.

Valerie Perry

Pete McBride has had an invigorating last few months. He’s been on the road with his film, “Delta Dawn,” about his journey down the Colorado River, and seeing its waters meet the ocean for the first time in decades. McBride’s film has garnered several awards. He talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about the feedback he’s gotten from moviegoers and film festivals.

 

Nathan Lopez Photography

Colorado Mountain College has chosen a Dean for its Roaring Fork Campus. Heather Exby will lead the three locations for the broader Valley-wide campus: Carbondale, Spring Valley, and Glenwood Springs.

Mountain Edition - April 23rd, 2015

Apr 23, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

RFTA gets millions for more parking, service, and facilities.

A Basalt woman is sentenced for causing a fatal accident last August.

Aspen Skiing Company and pro skier Alice McKennis look back on the season.

There’s a new book about Glenwood Springs history.

A nonprofit aims to restore part of the Crystal River in Carbondale.

And we find out about the country’s biggest conservation effort ever and a bird here in Colorado.

That’s ahead on Mountain Edition.

Elise Thatcher

There’s a new book about the history of Glenwood Springs. Called "Images of Early Glenwood Springs," it’s a compilation of photos from the late 1800s through 1920. Cynthia Hines is the author, and she’s also Executive Director of the Frontier Historical Society in Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Hines about the book.

 

screengrab NBC

Glenwood Springs resident Alice McKennis is having a great spring. The professional ski racer and twenty-five-year old won a national title at the US Alpine Championships in March. She took first in the Super Giant Slalom. It was a strong finish to what she calls a good season. McKennis talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about what it was like earning first place, after a long road to recovery following two broken legs.

Elise Thatcher

Candidates for Aspen’s City Council met for another forum last night. It focused on issues that are key for many to residents in their 20s, 30s and 40s. Six contenders perched on bar chairs and answered questions in the Sky Hotel. Most were about affordable housing and how to develop better job opportunities in the community.

  A Basalt woman will spend five years on probation for causing a fatal car crash on Highway 133 last summer. The accident killed a young woman who was traveling cross-country with her boyfriend. Note: this article includes Aspen Public Radio’s full interview with Christine Tinner.

Wikimedia Commons

There’s opposition to a smoking ban at a cluster of Aspen’s health buildings. Smoking bans in public places are common, especially in locations where people get medical treatment. Such a prohibition is proposed for Aspen Valley Hospital, a nearby Senior Center, and the Pitkin County Schultz Health and Human Services Building next door.

https://www.facebook.com/meleyna.kistner/photos

There may be resolution today in charges against a driver who caused a fatal car crash last summer. Basalt resident Christine Tinner is scheduled to have her say in court, wrapping up a delayed sentencing hearing. Tinner has pleaded guilty to two counts of careless driving, after causing an accident on Highway 133 last summer.

Marshall Hall-Interactive Outdoors, Inc.

The Castle Creek Valley is a well loved recreation corridor, and local and federal officials want to make sure it’s being managed properly. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has an update on those efforts.

Mountain Edition - April 16, 2015

Apr 16, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

Glenwood Springs swears-in two new city council members.

Pitkin County judges rule on three high profile cases.

Ballots go in the mail to voters for Aspen’s spring election.

As the Aspen chamber of commerce comes under fire for a campaign.

We’ll find out which candidates in the Aspen race have raised the most money so far.

Questions are raised about the main affordable housing program in the Upper Valley.

We hear from a Forest Service District ranger about controlled burns.

http://www.ijn.com/

  Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day, and there’s a small gathering in Aspen hoping to raise awareness about the atrocity that took place in the first half of the last century. Members of Aspen’s faith community spent several hours on the Cooper Avenue pedestrian mall, handing out pamphlets.

The Colorado Department of Transportation is holding an open house next week, about construction on Highway 133. Next Thursday, April 23rd, CDOT and contractors are hoping to entice locals to spend an evening at Carbondale’s Town Hall. They’re presenting information about what’s happening during the project.

Elise Thatcher

Officials say there's nothing illegal going on with how a local affordable housing program is being governed. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher was at last night’s Aspen/Pitkin County Housing Authority meeting and has this story, and a full copy of the memo.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

The Aspen Chamber Resort Association has detailed how it’s not spending tax dollars on a campaign against a city ballot question.  The Chamber is under fire for participating in a push to defeat Referendum 1. If passed, it would require a public vote for certain kinds of development. Critics say a publicly funded organization like the Chamber should not be using taxpayer dollars to defeat the referendum. 

Glenwood Springs will hold a swearing-in on Thursday, for new City Council members. One of them is Kathryn Trauger, who won the At Large seat in the recent election. She says she feels ready to join Council.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the final episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear about something called Doctor in a Box.

“It’s telemedicine that you can have in the privacy of your own home, or you can actually take the kit with you while you’re traveling and have consistent access to health care.”

The idea comes from a firm who also came up with a bike you probably saw on facebook or twitter last year. Yes, we’ll hear where the Denny Bike is now.

  Concerns about  Aspen's Chamber of Commerce and a ballot referendum got a close look at Monday night’s City Council meeting. Backers of the referendum argue it's inappropriate for the Aspen Chamber Resort Association to lobby against the local measure, since the group receives public funding through the City of Aspen. They also point out it looks shady that two City Council members are part of the Chamber's campaign.

Pages