Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher joined Aspen Public Radio in 2013. Previously she worked as a freelancer, covering Southwestern Colorado, as well as with Colorado Public Radio, National Public Radio, KBOO Portland, and KWCW Whitman College. Elise is an award-winning journalist who relishes digging deep into complex issues, as well as covering day to day stories. When away from the microphone, she enjoys rock climbing, mountain biking, backcountry skiing, and other outdoor opportunities.

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Mountain Edition - March 26th, 2015

Mar 26, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Residents in the Mid-Valley saw federal agents in tactical gear this week. We’ll tell you why.

A police officer involved in a controversial arrest of an Aspen teenager says he’s leaving the department.

Proponents and opponents of a ballot measure to change Aspen’s land use code sound off at a town hall meeting.

A beloved restaurant in Aspen will keep its doors open longer than expected.

And, a popular Aspen bike-sharing program wants to expand its reach.

Elise Thatcher

Little Annie’s lives again. Aspen’s long suffering affordable eatery was supposed to close next week. But it turns out Little Annie’s can stay open. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has the story.

Elise Thatcher

Proponents of a land use referendum were the most vocal attendees, at a town hall forum in Aspen last night. Aspen Public Radio arranged the event, which had a panel of speakers for and against the referendum. Of the approximately sixty people in attendance, those in favor of the ballot question, and further restricting development, were more likely to ask questions.

  Standing on stage and telling a very personal story can take nerves of steel. Tonight, more than a handful of locals are giving it a try. The event is similar to the radio show The Moth. It’s part of a new local series by Justice Snow’s and Colorado Mountain College. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story.

www.thinq-education.com

There is no formal opposition so far to Referendum 1, which would change Aspen’s City Charter. Aspen Public Radio is hosting a moderated forum tomorrow night on the referendum, featuring proponents and opponents of the measure. The town hall starts at 5:30 at the Belly Up and is free and open to the public. It will be broadcast live and online, at aspenpublicradio.org.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the third episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we hear from the doctor who keeps an eye on infectious diseases for the National Institutes of Health. With the measles outbreak in December, he’s tackling the vaccine controversy head on by getting the word out to parents who have not already vaccinated their kids.

“I would try and convince them by, first of all, not attacking them.”

poz.com

Vaccines have gotten a lot more attention in the last few months. Officials, parents, and others are grappling with a measles outbreak that started in Disneyland, in late December. Doctor Anthony Fauci is Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. That’s at the National Institutes of Health. Fauci spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. He says there could be more measles outbreaks, because there are so many unvaccinated people in the United States.

This week, Snowmass Village is hosting a police skiing competition. The North American Police Ski and Snowboard Championships is an international gathering. Officers from Europe and North America are battling it out on the slopes. 

Elise Thatcher

The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment has released the latest on job numbers in the Roaring Fork Valley. The unemployment rate dropped in Pitkin, Eagle, and Garfield counties, from last January to this January.

Voices for the Krabloonik Dogs is changing its name. The group has been raising concerns about sled dogs in Snowmass Village for many years, and now plans to focus more on state and national regulations. 

aspenart.org

The Red Brick Center for the Arts will be Aspen’s second vote center for this spring’s election.

All registered voters will receive mail in ballots, which can be mailed back or dropped off at City Hall. On election day, residents can also cast their ballot at the clerk’s office in City Hall or the Red Brick Center for the Arts. 

Mike Eliason / Santa Barbara County Fire Department

Rifle will soon be home to a new wildland firefighting training center. The Rifle - Garfield County Airport has been chosen to house what’s being called the Center of Excellence for Advanced Technology Aerial Firefighting. It’s planned to be a research location for testing out aerial firefighting techniques, and will be used by local, state, and federal entities.

Aspen Skiing Company

  The lower part of Aspen Mountain was closed for a big chunk of Thursday. Aspen Skiing Company did avalanche control work early that morning morning, causing several unusually large slides in the “dumps” on Ajax. So much snow came down, Ski Co. says it took until mid afternoon to clear off the run leading to Kleenex Corner, as well as the intersection of Spar and Copper. Skiers and boarders had to download on the gondola for most of the day. This is possibly the first time that kind of closure has happened in decades.

Mountain Edition - March 19th, 2015

Mar 19, 2015

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Elected leaders in Aspen choose a brewery - slash - small business incubator to fill the city-owned Old Power House.

Unstable snow on local ski slopes prompts the Aspen Skiing Company to temporarily close terrain.

A professional cross country ski racer is home from the World Championships. Aspen’s Simi Hamilton looks back on his season.

There won’t be a sentence for a fatal highway 133 crash for another month.

We hear from the head of Colorado’s largest oil and gas organization about why she’s leaving her post.

Elise Thatcher

The Aspen Community Church is celebrating its 125th anniversary. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher visited on Tuesday, and has this story.

Bryan Dunnewald is practicing on the organ, in the sanctuary of the community church.  He’ll be performing here tonight. “I think the most interesting thing about this church is that it’s what I would consider a small town or country church,” says Dunnewald. “But it has a really nice acoustic, which is rare."

plexiglassplus.com

If Aspen voters pass a charter referendum this spring, that will mean rewriting the city’s land use code. On Monday, City Council decided to tighten up when developers can build extra large buildings. Council Members restricted exceptions, called waivers, to five percent bigger than the square footage normally allowed, and two feet higher than maximum height. They also removed affordable housing waivers, except for projects benefitting the community or part of the historic preservation program. Council did not change parking requirements.

StockMonkeys.com

It’ll be more than a month before the woman who caused a fatal accident on Highway 133 last summer will get to say her piece in court. Basalt resident Christine Tinner had pleaded guilty to two counts of careless driving. She hit a car last August, killing the driver and injuring a passenger. Tinner had an emotional breakdown last Friday during her multi-day sentence hearing. That meant the judge couldn't make a final decision about the sentence. Now Tinner is scheduled to appear in court, and tell her side of the story, on April 21st.

Colorado Avalanche Information Center

On Tuesday, the Colorado Avalanche Information Center released a more detailed review of what happened during a slide on New Year’s Day. Aspen Mountain Powders Tours had a tough day on the first day of 2015. The company, operated through Aspen Skiing Company, had a ski guide injured in an avalanche, and was one person away from injuring a client. 

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

This is the second episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today, we’ll find out what living longer can mean both emotionally and logistically.

“I ask people on a regular basis, if you have an extra 30 years, where would you put them. And no one has ever said, ‘I’d want to make old age longer.’ ”

We’ll also hear about one way of becoming younger by using blood. That’s right, blood.

news.stanford.edu

Life expectancy in the United States is radically longer now compared to a hundred years ago. Researcher Laura Carstensen studies what life is like during our later years. She’s Director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, and spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about exploring what we can do with longer lives.

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