Elise Thatcher

Reporter

Elise Thatcher joined Aspen Public Radio in 2013. Previously she worked as a freelancer, covering Southwestern Colorado, as well as with Colorado Public Radio, National Public Radio, KBOO Portland, and KWCW Whitman College. Elise is an award-winning journalist who relishes digging deep into complex issues, as well as covering day to day stories. When away from the microphone, she enjoys rock climbing, mountain biking, backcountry skiing, and other outdoor opportunities.

Ways to Connect

Elise Thatcher

Basalt is choosing from a list of four companies that want to build the town’s long-anticipated underpass.

Marci Krivonen

There’s growing concern in Carbondale about a concentration of marijuana businesses in one neighborhood. Sixteen pot-related operations are grouped in the Buggy Village area near Highway 133.

Barbara Platts

Three Town Council seats are up for grabs in Basalt’s spring election, and the mayor’s post is also in contention. Aspen Public Radio hosted a candidate forum last night at the Basalt Regional Library. Candidates staked out their positions and answered pointed questions.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen City Council puts the brakes on development downtown.

Aspen Film announces the ShortsFest lineup.

The Roaring Fork Fishing Guide Alliance/Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife

It’s common to have stream closures this time of year — near the Roaring Fork and Colorado rivers. That’s to protect fish, and now there’s a new effort to make sure people follow the rules.

The idea is to protect spawning trout, which congregate in certain places upstream from the Roaring Fork and Colorado rivers. Fishing during spawning stresses out the trout, making it easier for them to die.

The closures mean no fishing and a new set of signs are alerting anglers to the restrictions. The postings are part of a collaboration by the Roaring Fork Fishing Guide Alliance and the Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife.

Four streams in the Roaring Fork Valley area are affected by the closures. Those are Grizzly and No Name creeks, as tributaries to the Colorado River, and Three-Mile and Four-Mile creeks, as tributaries to the Roaring Fork River. The closures affect a half a mile on each creek.

Elise Thatcher

  As primaries continue across the country, Colorado legislators are mulling whether to return to that method or stick with just caucuses. As Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher reports, election officials in the Roaring Fork Valley area have estimated how much more a primary would cost.

Elise Thatcher

Pedestrians no longer have their own bridge across the Colorado River in Glenwood Springs. The popular mode of travel for getting from one side of town to the other is now a walkway, next to four lanes of traffic. Tourists and visitors appear to be embracing the new temporary connection.

  February was a rough month for tourism in the Aspen area. Little snow, high winds and an airport equipment problem made the Upper Valley less enticing and a lot harder to get to. But the real kicker was the long closure on I-70 in Glenwood Canyon.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement

  A troubled postal worker has been deported from the country. We have an update on a case that involved federal courts, immigration officials, firearms and a restraining order filed by a local woman.

Auden Schendler

Mar 11, 2016

Name and age? Auden Schendler, 45

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here? I came here because I wanted to be in the mountains. I stay here because of the community, the beauty, the small town-ness, my work and because my family loves it here.

For the full list of questions and answers, click here.

Herschel Ross

Mar 11, 2016

Name and age? Herschel Ross, 73

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here? I started a second dental practice here in ’93. I found that when I had built both it and the Snowmass Village practices up to where I could sell one that it was Basalt where I wanted to live and work.

For the full list of questions and answers, click here.

Jacque Whitsitt

Mar 11, 2016

Name and age?  Jacque Whitsitt, 62

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here?  Basalt was my husband’s childhood vacationland. His family traveled from Kansas City to spend many summers riding horses and recreating in Emma. No arm twisting was needed when he suggested that we leave corporate jobs in Denver to relocate here.  The rural, laid back nature of the midvalley is still what keeps us here.  Living on the river in Basalt is a dream come true.

For a full list of questions and answers, click here.

Jennifer Riffle

Mar 11, 2016

Name and age? Jennifer Riffle, 37

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here? Affordable housing, small-town character and temperate climate brought me to Basalt and keeps me here. I’m invested in Basalt with my service-based business (estate manager/chef), homeownership, my husband’s business (owner’s representative for construction management; Rocky Mountain Institute is one of his projects) and it’s heaven.

For the full list of questions and answers, click here.

Katie Schwoerer

Mar 11, 2016

Name? Katie Schwoerer (no age given)

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here? Basalt is my home because I enjoy the town’s historic, small-town character; the readily accessible recreational opportunities of the mountains, rivers and trails; and, the passionate, intelligent residents who care about preserving  our exceptional town and valley.

For a full list of questions and answers, click here.

Leroy Duroux

Mar 11, 2016

Name and age? Leroy Duroux, 66 

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here? I was born in Aspen and my family moved to Basalt in 1963. My wife Janice was also born in the Basalt area. We raised two children — Amy French and Darren Duroux. We have family members who settled here 100-plus years ago and we have not found a more desirable place to live.

For the full list of questions and answers, click here.

Rick Stevens

Mar 11, 2016

Name and age? Rick Stevens, 64

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here?  We came to Basalt after 11 years in Aspen in 1987 because the community offered a chance to stay in the valley and raise a family. Basalt was affordable, friendly and unified. It was also promising to young families, it had good schools that were getting better and it’s close to the mountains.

For the full list of questions and answers, click here.

Rob Leavitt

Mar 11, 2016

Name and age?  Rob Leavitt, 51

What brought you to Basalt and what keeps you here? I moved to Basalt from Aspen after my second daughter was born. Though I was initially anxious about the move, I quickly came to love living in the midvalley and would never trade the quality of life we have here.

For the full list of questions and answers, click here.

Elise Thatcher

A big snowstorm hit during the X Games this winter, making it hard to get around on the event’s biggest day. But as Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher reports, the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority still saw record ridership that weekend.

Elise Thatcher

Basalt Town Council members are paid less than people in similar positions with other towns in the Roaring Fork Valley. Council members are now looking at increasing their pay. The review comes with an April election on the horizon.

Elise Thatcher

If you spend enough time in the Roaring Fork Valley, you’ll hear this sentence: the White River National Forest is the busiest, most visited National Forest in the country. But as the agency’s budget keeps dropping, officials say there will be significant changes down the road.

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