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Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

The City of Aspen has agreed to move water rights for storage out of Castle and Maroon Creeks.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

After nine deaths in the Elk Mountain backcountry last summer, Mountain Rescue Aspen wanted change. The organization has teamed up with the Pitkin County Sheriff’s office and the U.S. Forest Service on a new campaign aimed at helping prepare people for backcountry adventures.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Earlier this month, Aspen city council declared a "stage one" drought. This means the city is asking residents to voluntarily cut back on irrigation and water consumption and is requiring that city government do the same.

Courtesy of Bluegreen Aspen

On Tuesday, Pitkin County commissioners and Basalt town council members will hear an update on plans to upgrade the areas surrounding the whitewater park.

Courtesy of the Wilderness Workshop

Last week, the Wilderness Workshop announced that executive director Sloan Shoemaker was stepping down after 21 years with the conservation organization. Will Roush, who has been with Wilderness Workshop since 2009, will take over the position in September. They both spoke with Aspen Public Radio environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy about the organization and the transition.

Courtesy of CLEER

Ed Mazria founded the organization Architecture 2030, with the goal that all new buildings will be carbon-neutral by 2030. Last week, he spoke at a symposium in Carbondale that was hosted by local energy efficiency organizations.

Hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Wyatt Orme bring you highlights of the week in news in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Before Independence Pass opens to vehicles next week, a local nonprofit is encouraging cyclists to enjoy the empty road, for a cause.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen Skiing Company wants to expand trails and snowmaking operations on Aspen Mountain. The proposal needs approval from the U.S. Forest Service, which is looking for public input.

Courtesy of The Mountain Pact

Earlier this month, Aspen city council member Ann Mullins traveled to Washington D.C. to advocate for public lands issues. She was there with the Mountain Pact, an advocacy group representing mountain communities.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

At a meeting this week, Garfield County Commissioners agreed to continue funding ongoing work to improve the health of Cattle Creek.

This week, voters approved a tax increase to help fund Crown Mountain Park in El Jebel. The City of Aspen said it's close to reaching settlement agreements with some of the groups who oppose its work to retain rights to build reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. And Basalt Town Council is anticipating the same housing issues that Aspen now dealing with.

www.facebook.com/aspenpolice

Aspen police are asking city council to approve a new law aimed at keeping people from harassing wildlife. It comes amid growing concerns about public safety — and the health of local bears.

Two local filmmakers are bringing the story of Roaring Fork Valley farmers to the big screen. The award-winning documentary “How We Grow” makes its home premiere this weekend.

Courtesy of Ann Mullins

Aspen city councilmember Ann Mullins was among elected representatives from five mountain communities who traveled to Washington D.C. last week. They were there with the advocacy group Mountain Pact.

Alycin Bektesh

This January, Aaron Million filed a claim for water on the Green River, with plans to divert it to Colorado’s Front Range. The proposal, and the many objections filed in response to it, have raised questions about just how much water is available from the Colorado River and its tributaries.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is making progress toward settlement in a state water court case regarding storage rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

www.aspenfire.com

Tuesday is the last day to cast a ballot for Aspen’s Fire Protection District board of directors.

Bureau of Land Management

The federal government has released plans to ease restrictions on oil and gas development near sage grouse habitat, including changes to Colorado's plan.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Stream flows in the Roaring Fork watershed are slowly creeping upward, but the effects of this winter’s low snowpack are already showing.

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