Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

As Pitkin County Open Space and Trails staff works to design a trail up the Crystal River Valley, a local conservation organization wants to make sure wildlife is protected.

 

It’s been over a month since the Aspen area has seen significant rainfall, and the smaller grasses and brush present fire danger. Aspen Fire Marshall Parker Lathrop said that’s why there will be no fireworks over Aspen Mountain to celebrate Independence Day this year.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The U.S. Forest Service released a draft decision yesterday on its plan to combat overuse in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness. The first step is to address the Conundrum valley.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Conundrum Hot Springs has been targeted as a “hot spot” by the outdoor ethics organization Leave No Trace.

Courtesy of coloradowildpubliclands.org

The nonprofit Colorado Wild and Public Lands is suing the federal government over a land exchange. It’s the latest step in years of debate over the Sutey property.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The Aspen Ideas Festival brings together top thinkers across a wide variety of topics and issues — and a daily environmental fix.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The Spotlight Health series wrapped up last weekend This year, it included a focus on how environmental factors influence health. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy was there for several discussions on this topic, including one called “Human Health and the Planet.” She spoke about this with producer Christin Kay.

 

 

 

Michael Brune is the executive director of the Sierra Club, the conservation organization founded by John Muir 125 years ago. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy caught up with Brune at the summit for the American Renewable Energy Institute (AREDAY).

“We must understand and define conservation and social justice as our collective self-preservation – a rationale that crosses all boundaries between all people.”

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Winds pushed smoke from several wildfires in Utah, Arizona and California into the Roaring Fork Valley Thursday. The smoke is likely to stick around Friday as well.

 

Courtesy of Aspen Skiing Company

Aspen Skiing Company and the U.S. Forest Service have finalized plans for an expansion of summer activities at Snowmass Ski Area.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Aspen’s summer season officially kicked off last weekend with the Food and Wine Classic. It’s an iconic event — and one that also sets the bar for how to manage the far less glamorous side: taking out the trash.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

American Renewable Energy Day (AREDAY), has grown from a one-day expo to a nearly week-long summit. This year’s event kicked off yesterday in Snowmass. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy was there and shares what she learned with news director Carolyn Sackariason.

Aspen Public Radio News

This week, Pitkin County Commissioners will consider changes to the parking area at Buttermilk.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Roaring Fork Valley native Rickey Gates is a little over halfway through a 3,500-mile run across the country. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy caught up with him on his stop-over in Aspen last week, which included a little friendly competition.

 

Courtesy of City of Aspen

Drivers interested in going electric can test out cars today in Aspen.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Water levels on the Roaring Fork River are expected to rise next week as Twin Lakes Reservoir reaches capacity.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Visitors at Ruedi Reservoir this summer will find new gates at the boat ramp, as officials are restricting access so they can more effectively screen for invasive species of mussels. Keeping these creatures out of the reservoir is top priority.

Courtesy of www.courts.state.co.us/Courts/live

 

The Colorado Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday about the City of Aspen’s fee on disposable grocery bags.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Two of the Roaring Fork Valley’s premier conservation organizations, the Wilderness Workshop and Aspen Valley Land Trust, are celebrating their 50th anniversaries this year. They threw a joint party in Carbondale last Friday, where Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy caught up with Michael McVoy, who has served on the boards of both organizations.

 

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