Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be making a return to both the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, and the field of journalism. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen, and is thrilled to be reporting about all things environmental in this special place. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship, and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is looking forward to combining her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of www.springgulch.org

The Mount Sopris Nordic Council is hosting the 25th annual Ski for Sisu to raise funds for the Spring Gulch cross-country trails. It’s also a celebration of the area’s storied history.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Mountain lion activity on the Rio Grande Trail near the Aspen Airport Business Center has Pitkin County officials on alert.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Some of Snowmass’ oldest residents recently returned to their old stomping grounds.

Aspen Public Radio News

The City of Aspen has been experimenting with snow removal on the Castle Creek Bridge.

Courtesy photo / Spear Point Energy

Aspen businessman and geologist Todd Mitchell was reappointed to Colorado’s Air Quality Control Commission last week.

Wilderness Workshop

Local non-profit Wilderness Workshop has a new tool for those who want to advocate for environmental conservation. The watchdog organization recently launched an email service called Capital Watch that suggests quick actions to protect public lands. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat down with executive director Sloan Shoemaker.

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

The City of Aspen and Aspen Skiing Company took advantage of cold temperatures this week to make piles of snow … in Wagner Park. City officials said this in preparation for the alpine skiing World Cup finals.

Aspen Public Radio News

The Pitkin County Landfill started recycling textiles last fall, and now accepts those items at the Rio Grande Recycling Center. There are now collection bins for things like clothes, blankets, shoes, handbags and backpacks that would not be acceptable for resale at thrift shops.  

Courtesy of Emily Hornback/Western Colorado Congress

Citizens groups in Battlement Mesa are fighting an application to put an injection well near their drinking water supply.

Courtesy of Jeff Lukas

Communities across Colorado are working to understand how climate change might affect future water supplies. University of Colorado researcher Jeff Lukas will speak as part of the Naturalist Nights environmental speaker series this week. He told Elizabeth Stewart-Severy that the Roaring Fork Valley has seen fewer climate risks than elsewhere in the state.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

A thousand people took to the streets and slopes on Saturday in Aspen as part of a nationwide show of solidarity. The group ski and march through town came on President Trump’s first day in office, in response to divisive campaign rhetoric.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County is five months into the construction of a whitewater park in Basalt. Crews with excavators and hand shovels are at work in the empty riverbed, below the surface water level.

courtesy of Women for Wild Lands

President-elect Trump takes the oath of office today, prompting several local groups to take to the streets — and slopes — tomorrow.

Courtesy of Pitkin County

The results are in from an environmental analysis of the proposed expansion of the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport. The public has a chance to learn more Thursday evening.

Aspen Public Radio News

Administrators at Aspen schools recently finished a thorough round of testing, but these tests are not for students. They are designed to see if the district’s buildings are performing as efficiently as they should be, and there is some real work to do to get smarter.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

As part of ongoing efforts to extend the life of the Pitkin County Landfill, the county has announced plans to begin recycling mattresses.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

John Marzluff is a professor of wildlife science at the University of Washington. He is in the valley this week to talk about his research on birds’ responses to urbanization, as part of the local environmental speaker series Naturalist Nights. He spoke with Elizabeth Stewart-Severy by phone from Washington state.

Aspen Public Radio News

Last week’s wet storms brought fresh powder up high, but left Aspen’s streets flooded and then frozen.

Courtesy of www.solarpacificfiji.com

Local skiers will be carrying solar-powered torches down Little Nell before Aspen’s annual Winterskol fireworks display. Those lights will go on to power a community in Fiji.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails is starting the planning process for a trail that will connect Carbondale and Crested Butte. The first chance for public comment is Thursday.

Pages