Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County is releasing plans Tuesday for a new parking area and trail at Prince Creek in Carbondale.

Courtesy of Community Office for Resource Efficiency

This will be the first full summer that Colorado residents can legally use rain barrels to conserve water. Local organizations are helping people learn how.

Courtesy of www.climate-mayors.org

President Trump’s announcement Thursday that the U.S. is withdrawing from the Paris Agreement hit close to home.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County’s plan for dealing with natural hazards is due for an update. The 2017 edition will consider climate change impacts.

Instagram/whitehouse

Local governments in the Roaring Fork Valley have long grappled with environmental issues, including work to lower greenhouse gas emissions, protect wilderness areas from overuse, keep water in the rivers and more. For the first time in many local elected officials’ tenure, these priorities are under threat from the national administration. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy asked local officials how they are working to influence national policy.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

With summer season warming up, area wildlife agencies are reminding people to respect trails that remain closed.

Aspen Public Radio

The Roaring Fork River is on Colorado’s list of impaired rivers, so City of Aspen officials are working on a plan to improve the health of the waterway. In the third conversation of a series, environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and producer Christin Kay discuss how homes and businesses have damaged some of the important areas riparian along the river.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen City Council adopted a new management plan for Cozy Point Ranch earlier this spring. The city is now looking to sign some long-term leases on the property.

Courtesy of Liz O'Connell Chapman

Liz Chapman from the Aspen environmental health department has been appointed to a state commission that regulates trash and hazardous waste.

Courtesy of www.generationwild.com

The statewide non-profit Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) has launched a new effort to get kids outside.

Courtesy of City of Aspen

Representatives from 27 Colorado communities took a pledge last week in Aspen to act aggressively on climate change.

Courtesy of Jeremy Swanson/Aspen Skiing Company

The Aspen Skiing Company announced Monday that skiers will get to enjoy last week’s winter storm. Aspen Mountain will reopen for Memorial Day weekend.  

 

Courtesy of City of Aspen Parks and Engineering

The Roaring Fork is on Colorado’s list of impaired rivers. City of Aspen officials are working on a plan to improve the health of the Roaring Fork River.

Courtesy of City of Aspen

A plan to widen the sidewalk on Castle Creek Bridge is on hold.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Colorado is the first — and only — state in the country to dedicate a holiday to public lands, and the celebration begins Saturday.  

 

Marci Krivonen/Aspen Public Radio News

Mayors, councilmembers and county commissioners from across Colorado will gather in Aspen Thursday and Friday to discuss climate change initiatives.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Young and newborn wildlife often attract the attention of well-meaning citizens. Wildlife agencies and local nonprofits are reminding people to keep their distance.

courtesy of Studio JDK

Aspen Skiing Co. officials are working on a new master plan for Aspen Mountain. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been reporting on how that document might shape the ski area for the next two decades, and she sat down with Aspen Public Radio producer Christin Kay to talk about plans for a new 1A lift and reopening of Ruthie’s Restaurant.

   

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Mountain bikers and hikers will see some changes at Prince Creek this summer, and the public can give input this week.

Courtesy of Olivia Oksenhorn

State funds will soon be available for schools to test for lead contamination in water, and local districts are on board.

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