Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be making a return to both the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, and the field of journalism. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen, and is thrilled to be reporting about all things environmental in this special place. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship, and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is looking forward to combining her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The so-called Snowmastodon site at Ziegler Reservoir in Snowmass is the largest fossil discovery in Colorado history. Scientists from across the world are still working to understand the changing environment in which those plants and animals lived. Stephanie Lukowski is the Ice Age Discovery Center’s paleontologist. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy met with her outside of the Discovery Center in Snowmass.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Roaring Fork Valley is a biking wonderland in the summer months, rife with world-class singletrack trails and scenic, quiet roads. But in the winter, it’s a different landscape. Local mountain bikers are working to change that.

Courtesy of Colorado Avalanche Information Center

A heavy, wet winter storm has brought lots of snow and statewide avalanche warnings.

On Monday night, Aspen council members approved a request to work with the Department of Energy to learn more about the city’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The winter months are prime time for spotting coyotes, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) officials warn that the predators may become more aggressive in January and February.

Coyotes breed in the first months of the year. CPW officials say as the predators pair up to find space to have their young, they can become more territorial and hostile.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Naturalist Night lecture series kicks off Wednesday evening in Carbondale, beginning another season for a Roaring Fork Valley staple.

Courtesy of Mark Duff

The U.S. Forest Service has taken initial steps to sell two properties totaling about 70 acres of land adjacent to Crown Mountain Park and the Roaring Fork River in the mid-valley. The move comes as the agency works to reduce costs amid funding cuts.

Aspen Public Radio News

A busy holiday season in Aspen had more people than ever moving through the airport.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The last day to formally challenge the City of Aspen’s conditional water rights on Maroon and Castle creeks was Dec. 31. At least 10 people and organizations are opposing the city in court.

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

Christmas trees that have passed their prime may see another life at area landfills.

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

The number of visitors to Aspen and Snowmass hit its peak yesterday and will stay there for the next few days.

Courtesy of Rocky Mountain Wolf Project

Montana State Sen. Mike Phillips has been a part of efforts across the country to restore populations of wolves. He was recently involved in their reintroduction to Yellowstone National Park, and is now launching the Rocky Mountain Wolf Project, with a goal of bringing the apex predators back to Colorado. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat down with Phillips earlier this month to discuss what wolf recovery in this state could look like.

American Rivers

The City of Aspen has filed to keep conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon creeks because, council members say, the town may one day need water storage. The national advocacy group American Rivers plans to be one of several organizations that will oppose the city in water court.

Courtesy of RFTA

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) has six new buses running on natural gas, and local commuters could continue to see more environmentally-friendly options on the roads.

http://www.energysmartcolorado.com/aspenenergychallenge

As 2016 draws to a close, so does the Aspen Energy Challenge, but the city is continuing work on energy efficiency.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Elected officials have approved the purchase of $7 million worth of conservation easements and land in Pitkin County.

Courtesy of James Swomley

The U.S. Forest Service has a plan to clear cut some sections of the Upper Fryingpan Valley, beyond Ruedi Reservoir. The first round of public comment has ended, and some people are not happy about logging operations in this recreational area.

Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County commissioners voted Tuesday to oppose the City of Aspen’s claim to conditional water rights on Maroon and Castle creeks.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

This holiday season, while trash cans across America overflow with packaging, wrapping paper and discarded gifts, the Pitkin County Landfill faces an even bigger issue: the by-products of luxury building.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

Earlier this fall, Aspen City Council heard loud and clear that residents don’t want to see dams on Castle or Maroon creeks, and then filed to keep the rights to build reservoirs there anyway. Now the city is making good on its promise to explore other options.

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