Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Sam Howzit

Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo has lifted the county-wide fire ban.

After one month of restrictions, local fire chiefs now say that the danger is waning. A few weeks of July showers have brought the fuel-moisture level in the county back to near-normal levels. Aspen Fire chief Rick Ballentine said this doesn’t necessarily mean we’re out of the woods.

Courtesy of Aspen Global Change Institute

Over twenty years ago, Dr. Ben Santer was part of the team of international scientists who first published work showing climate change can be attributed to human influence. He discussed his work with Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.

 

Courtesy of www.carbondalegov.org

The Carbondale Board of Trustees is considering a new bill of rights — for the environment.

 

Courtesy of Glynwood Farm

  The way we eat contributes to a warmer world. An author, soil scientist and farmer will discuss “resilient agriculture” in Aspen on Thursday.

Aspen Public Radio

When Roaring Fork Valley residents turn on the tap, they count on high quality water. There’s a new online tool for consumers to find out what exactly is in their tap water.

Brent Gardner-Smith / Aspen Journalism

As the City of Aspen is poised to purchase land that could be used as a reservoir, city council heard about the need for such water storage.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen has long encouraged residents to cut back on water consumption: Buy an efficient showerhead, turn off the tap while you brush your teeth. But now, officials are taking that message outside.

Courtesy of www.defense.gov

Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly spoke about the future of his department at a gathering of the nation’s top security experts in Aspen on Wednesday.

Courtesy of City of Aspen

As it faces opposition to its water rights to build dams on Castle and Maroon creeks, the City of Aspen is now is under contract to buy land as an alternative site for a reservoir.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

July in Aspen is peak tourist season. As part of a monthly series on Roaring Fork wildlife, Elizabeth Stewart-Severy checked in on some visitors from the south who are in the middle of some critical work this summer. It’s time for migratory birds to stretch their wings.

Courtesy of Conservation Colorado

Colorado’s rivers received their first-ever report cards from an environmental organization last week, and it’s a mixed bag.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Earlier this week, Aspen City Council heard an update on studies of the town’s risk for water storage.

Olivia Oksenhorn / Aspen Public Radio News

David Leonhardt is an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. He spoke Tuesday about the future of news.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The late June heat above Carbondale is dry and sneezy. Butterflies flutter through the sagebrush, stalked by teams of net-wielding students and scientists.

Courtesy of instagram.com/govofco

On Tuesday, Colorado became the latest state — and the first in the Rocky Mountain region — to commit to fighting climate change.

Courtesy of waltonfamilyfoundation.org

A billionaire family with ties to Aspen is concerned about the health of one of the region’s crucial bodies of water. The Walton Family Foundation will donate $20 million toward conservation programs aimed at keeping water in Colorado River. Grants were awarded to the National Wildlife Federation, American Rivers, Western Resource Advocates, the Environmental Defense Fund and other organizations.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Businesses across Colorado have penned their support of public lands in a letter to Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke.

courtesy of www.aspenrecreation.com

Aspen City Council will be hearing several updates regarding water storage this week. It comes nine months after council asked staff to explore alternatives to reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following this story and talked with Christin Kay about what consultants have found.

Courtesy of Upper Colorado River Fire Management Unit

Stage 1 fire restrictions are now in effect for the White River National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, and across six counties in the Colorado River Basin. This means no fireworks or other explosives, no smoking outside near dry vegetation and no fires outside of developed areas. Campfires are allowed only in grates — a rock campfire ring is not acceptable. Click here for more information.

Courtesy of www.instagram.com/outdoorretailer

Denver is the new home for the Outdoor Retailer Show, and the move from Salt Lake City has both symbolic and economic implications.

 

Organizers estimate that the three annual outdoor industry trade shows — including winter and summer markets, as well as a Snow Show — will bring a total of $110 million each year to Colorado and draw 85,000 attendees.

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