KAJX

Laura Crow

Development Associate

Laura hails from the Northwest, spending her childhood in Southeast Alaska. She headed to Los Angeles for college, where she got her Bachelor's degree in Theatre Arts and a minor in Photography from Loyola Marymount University. She stayed in Los Angeles after graduating and "accidentally" moved to Aspen when she was sent by Hillstone to open and train staff at the beloved White House Tavern. 

Laura previously worked at the Buddy Program as recruitment manager and programs coordinator. She remains a Big Buddy in our community. Laura has continually volunteered as a camp counselor for The Laurel Foundation in Los Angeles since 2009. She was awarded volunteer of the year in 2013 for organizing a yearly prom fundraiser and for her achievement in recruiting fellow counselors.

She is honored to join Aspen Public Radio, as she is a daily listener and supporter of APR and public radio. While growing up in Alaska, Laura's father had a weekly Sunday night jazz program on KRBD Ketchikan called Serenade in Jazz. She loved going down to the station, and even got to record a station ID- her first radio experience. 

Laura's interests include: traveling, theatre, photography, movies, Yellowstone, puns and breathing fresh air outside.

Ways to Connect

Roni Morales explains how Mountain Family Health Centers plays a role in the recent immigration concerns in our valley. Garry Schalla highlights the non-profits team-based system. 

Mountain Family Health Centers celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. They will also be celebrating the opening of a new Basalt location. They want the community to know that they are accessible to anyone. 

Ross Brooks is the CEO and patient of Mountain Family Health Centers. They have 170 people on staff serving the 19,000 patients in our community. Their non-profit gets base grant funding from the government as well as federal support. 

Ross Brooks is the CEO of Mountain Family Health Centers and he explains how their non-profit exists to make sure people have access to affordable, integrated, primary care. They serve over 19,000 people in our community. 

Board president of the Basalt Education Foundation, Erika Leavitt, says that the foundation's ability to raise money has increased over time. The organization is happy to share what they've learned with other communities.

The Basalt Education Foundation says that Colorado currently ranks 39th in the US per pupil funding. Their non-profit is very cognizant of what's happening at the state and federal level around public education.

The the granting committee of the Basalt Education Foundation considers a grant request from a teacher or administrator, they look at a few key components. They explain how they want the students to have the best education possible.

The Basalt Education Foundation serves the Basalt public schools. Between the elementary, middle and high school, they serve about 1600 students. The non-profit when through major strategic planning in 2013 and 2015 and now offer "administrator grants" to teachers and administrators in the schools.

Up until now, Women's Forum has grown strictly by word of mouth. Founder, Adelaide Waters, says that all women come together from the same starting point.

Founder of Women's Forum, Adelaide Waters, says that group dynamics, like all relationships, grow in stages. According to their website, the Women's Forum Handbook is an in-depth guide to group process, peer learning and personal growth. Adelaide Waters wrote and compiled the entire handbook.

Members of Women's Forum reflect on how the groups support each other with all of life's changes. Members also say that the support given by the group is invaluable with refining listening skills. Commitment and confidentially is important within the group dynamic. 

Women's Forum is an organization supporting women's personal and professional growth through peer-learning. Founder of Women's Forum, Adelaide Waters, says that Women's Forum groups act as a sounding board for all of life's choices and challenging times. 

Aspen Community Theatre provides scholarships to graduating seniors who are pursuing an education in theatre. Producer, Rita Hunter, says the best wat to get involved with ACT is to go to a show, and Monty Python's Spamalot is just around the corner. 

President of the board of directors for Aspen Community Theatre, Lynette Schlepp, says that ACT's shows are there to lighten things up when there's a lot going on in the world. Monty Python's Spamalot is a big undertaking, especially when it comes to the set. 

Producer Rita Hunter says that because there is a limited amount of people in the valley that have theatre experience, there is a lot of sharing and collaborating. This is ACT's 41st year, and November's production will be there 75th show.

Aspen Community Theatre was founded in 1976. They put on one musical each year at the District Theatre in the Aspen Elementary School. This year's production opens on November 3rd. 

District Manager of our local chapter, Jonathan Gorst, says the importance of keeping the younger generation in our valley and how important that is for our future economy. They encourage the community to reach out to them directly.

According to their website, Junior Achievement has contributed to the economics and business education of young people throughout the world. They say their unique system provides the training, materials, and support necessary to bolster the chances for student success.

Junior Achievement of the Roaring Fork Valley does not receive any funding from the National umbrella. All chapters function independently. Junior Achievement emphasizes the importance of their volunteers. 

Junior Achievement of the Roaring Fork Valley's purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. They believe that they are creating business leaders of the future.

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