Laura Crow

Development Associate

Laura hails from the Northwest, spending her childhood in Southeast Alaska. She headed to Los Angeles for college, where she got her Bachelor's degree in Theatre Arts and a minor in Photography from Loyola Marymount University. She stayed in Los Angeles after graduating and "accidentally" moved to Aspen when she was sent by Hillstone to open and train staff at the beloved White House Tavern. 

Laura previously worked at the Buddy Program as recruitment manager and programs coordinator. She remains a Big Buddy in our community. Laura has continually volunteered as a camp counselor for The Laurel Foundation in Los Angeles since 2009. She was awarded volunteer of the year in 2013 for organizing a yearly prom fundraiser and for her achievement in recruiting fellow counselors.

She is honored to join Aspen Public Radio, as she is a daily listener and supporter of APR and public radio. While growing up in Alaska, Laura's father had a weekly Sunday night jazz program on KRBD Ketchikan called Serenade in Jazz. She loved going down to the station, and even got to record a station ID- her first radio experience. 

Laura's interests include: traveling, theatre, photography, movies, Yellowstone, puns and breathing fresh air outside.

Ways to Connect

Each volunteer for CASA of the Ninth is assigned to one family, or CASA, to offer support in and out of the courtroom for the child or children involved in an abuse or neglect situation. CASA of the Ninth believes they are giving these child much needed support.

CASA of the Ninth was established in the Roaring Fork Valley in 2011. CASA stands for Court Appointed Special Advocates. Volunteers are placed with a "CASA", which may contain 1 child, or a few children. CASA volunteers do a great service to both the abused or neglected children as well as the court system. 

Habitat for Humanity Roaring Fork Valley has always been aware of the evolving affordable housing issues in our valley. The look forward to the proposed 27 condominium project on the hillside behind Basalt High School.

Habitat for Humanity employees understand and see the hardships of living in the valley when it comes to affordable housing. They encourage the community to do more than simply "talk" about the problem. 

Habitat for Humanity, Roaring Fork Valley's mission states that they "provide a hand up, not a hand out" through their home ownership opportunities. Every home that Habitat builds is purchased by the selected family partners; the homes are not given away.

In 1999, the local chapter of Habitat International was formed in the Roaring Fork Valley. The founders of our local chapter had great instincts, and foresaw what would become one of the biggest issues in the valley- the need for affordable housing. 

According to A Way Out, in 2016 the surgeon general said that 1 in 7 Americans will confront a substance abuse addiction. A client of A Way Out shares his experiences.

A Way Out sees a rise in both mental illness and substance abuse. They provide support throughout a person's entire recovery process. A client of A Way Out, shares his powerful story.

A Way Out gives community members an opportunity to get help with their addictions. Addiction impacts more than just the addicted, and A Way Out provides a comprehensive family program.

A Way Out's mission is to support people in drug and alcohol crisis with the treatment they need. Since Aspen is a resort destination, the issues of how substance abuse negatively impacts someone's life are kept out of the public eye. 

CORE would like to expand their outreach into even more communities. CORE keeps their eye on a national level, yet focuses on local and state levels to do what they can. CORE started collecting energy wasting "True Confessions" from the public.

CORE encourages valley residents to know that they can make their homes or apartments safer and more efficient. CORE emphasizes that it's important for building codes to be responsive to today's needs of reducing green house gas emissions.

CORE collaborates with local towns to adopt new building codes and energy efficient programs. Along with the City of Aspen, CORE created a new social movement called "The High-Five". They hope to inspire the community to start saving or to increase the amount of energy they are already saving.

CORE was founded in 1994, when the awareness of climate change shed light on how the Roaring Fork Valley's economy is dependent on a good, clean environment. Energy consumption is universal. CORE says that saving energy helps to protect our environment and our economy. 

Spring Board Aspen is looking to expand both their membership and outreach. They want the community to know that students pursuing college who are experiencing financial barriers as well as potential members can have access to them. Spring Board Aspen encourages those interested to be proactive and reach out to them. 

Spring Board Aspen teaches their members how to actually be on a board, be philanthropic and encourages future involvement with other non-profits. Board members frequently come together to decide on Aspen Spring Board's evolving and current mission. 

Spring Board Aspen Members not only learn how to be future philanthropic leaders, they also collaborate with schools in the valley to help alleviate the financial burden of high school students wanting to further their education. 

Spring Board Aspen members learn how to be future philanthropic leaders. Established in 1997 under the Aspen Community Foundation, there has been a great deal of reshaping and rebranding over the past 20 years. 

EcoFlight says that becoming a member of the environmental air force is being a part of an organization that is actually making a difference. EcoFlight offers a different, bird's eye view of the landscape.

EcoFlight president and founder, Bruce Gordon, explains why it's important for the people of the Roaring Fork Valley to understand the concept of an EcoFlight. 

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