Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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6:00am

Wed April 23, 2014
APR Local News

High Rent, Heavy Regulation Pose Challenges For Young Entrepreneurs In Aspen

Just what is the business climate like in Aspen for young entrepreneurs? For some, setting up shop in the resort is just the right fit.
Credit Flickr/Libby Levi/opensource.com

This month, we’ve been examining what it takes to live and work in Aspen, and whether the middle class is being priced out. Today we focus on young entrepreneurs and the barriers they face when opening a business in Aspen. For some the high rents and seasonal business is worth it, while others were forced to move Downvalley to make it work, financially. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Bo Gallagher, 24, switches on a large dryer in his silk-screening store, Zapazoo Inkworks. Unlike a clothes dryer, this machine has a wide conveyer belt.

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6:00am

Tue April 22, 2014
APR Local News

Study Links Proximity to Natural Gas Development And Birth Defects

A well pad and produced water near homes in Garfield County.
Credit Ecoflight

A new study from the Colorado School of Public Health links natural gas development with certain birth defects. The report, Natural Gas Development and Birth Outcomes, found congenital heart defects were 30 percent more likely in infants born to mothers living close to natural gas development. These defects happen before birth, when the blood vessels near the heart don’t develop normally. Lisa McKenzie is a Research Associate at the University of Colorado’s School of Public Health.

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6:00am

Fri April 18, 2014
APR Local News

Glenwood Conference: Fire Officials Look At "True Costs" Of Wildfire

The West Fork Fire Complex burned over 100,000 acres near Creede, Colorado last summer. The wildfire didn't burn homes but drove away tourism business.
Credit KSUT.org

The story of wildfire in the west is increasingly bleak. Fires are bigger, the wildfire season’s longer, and homes are increasingly built on lands at risk to fire. That’s the situation surrounding a wildfire conference in Glenwood Springs this week. Firefighters, elected officials and government workers met to try and find solutions. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, one idea is to expand biomass production.

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3:29pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition - April 17th, 2014

This week there are a few more clues, and lots of money, in the Nancy Pfister case.

Verizon customers saw a huge glitch in service this week.

It can be tough to run a retail business in Aspen, so we’ll find out what it takes.

We’ll also go to a busy clinic where busy doctors are serving a growing number of medicaid patients after the Obamacare deadline.

Glenwood Springs inches closer to getting a new bridge in downtown.

And locals are weighing in on how the state tackles water needs.

8:10am

Thu April 17, 2014
APR Local News

BLM Seeks Comments From Public On 65 Oil, Gas Leases

The contested Thompson Divide area near Carbondale is part of a swath of the White River National Forest that's up for review. The BLM is seeking public comment on how to manage existing oil and gas leases in these places.
Credit savethethompsondivide.org

The public is getting a chance this week to comment on what happens to existing oil and gas leases in Garfield, Pitkin and Mesa Counties. Sixty-five leases within the White River National Forest are up for review. Just eight of them hold active infrastructure, like gas wells. The Bureau of Land Management handles the leases and is soliciting feedback on what do with them.

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