Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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Scott Davidson/Flickr/Creative Commons

On February 10th, law enforcement responded to a domestic violence call at a residence near Parachute. They discovered a woman whose face was bloodied from being struck repeatedly. Later, the suspect - her husband - was shot to death by authorities after a high speed chase on Interstate 70. The fatal incident was one of two in Garfield County in February, where domestic violence played a role. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the problem of domestic violence is growing in parts of our region.

Roger Adams

The largest natural gas company in Garfield County announced layoffs on Monday. WPX is eliminating 11 of 231 positions at its office in Parachute. Twenty-five employees at the company’s Denver office are also losing their jobs. Company-wide, WPX is laying off 83 people. It operates in three major basins: in New Mexico, North Dakota and Colorado.

stopfightingithurts.com

Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department is launching a new website Monday meant to help with domestic violence. The site is called stopfightingithurts.com. It was designed to educate the community about the problem, and how it impacts children. Health and Human Services Director Nan Sundeen says it’s meant for neighbors, family and partners in relationship.

aspenpitkin.com

Aspen City Council Monday again tackled the issue of using hydroelectricity to generate power in town. The elected officials voted to allow a permit to expire for the controversial Castle Creek Energy Center. But, micro-hydro projects will be explored. 

The City is considering micro-hydro on Maroon and Castle Creeks for three reasons: to generate power using renewable sources, maintain healthy stream flows and preserve City water rights.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

A warrant is issued this week for a Carbondale man accused of killing his wife.

A long-time local and avid skier dies in an avalanche outside the Aspen Mountain ski area boundary.

And, a popular watering hole is closing in Aspen this spring.

Bus drivers in the Valley are voting to unionize. They’re concerned about wages.

Governor Hickenlooper’s oil and gas task force released its findings. They’re getting mixed reviews.

www.nbs.org

The annual Black Ski Summit wraps up on Saturday in Snowmass Village. The week-long event is celebrating its 42nd year.

The event has its roots in Snowmass Village. The National Brotherhood of Skiers started in the early 1970’s when African Americans on the ski slopes were a rarity and black ski clubs an exception.

White River National Forest

The White River National Forest has moved one step closer to approving several winter enhancements on public land at the Snowmass ski area.

The Aspen Skiing Company proposed the projects and the Forest Service began an environmental review in August. They include a replacement and realignment of the 35-year-old High Alpine chairlift, additional snowmaking on the Green Cabin run and trail and glade construction projects. The Skiing Company wants to provide gladed terrain for non-expert skiers.

Aspen Mountain Ski Patrol

The man who died in avalanche on the west side of Aspen Mountain was a long-time local who skied every day. John Martin Gancsos went by “Marty,” and had two passions: skiing and whitewater kayaking. The avalanche he was caught in Monday happened outside the ski area boundary, in an area Gancsos knew well. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The atmosphere at Little Annie’s Eating House Tuesday was somber. Marty Gancsos had been working night shifts at the restaurant as a favor to a friend. Rohn Fleming owns Little Annie’s and asked Gancsos to jump on board.

ourtownplanning.org

A plan to develop a boutique hotel and condominiums in downtown Basalt is moving forward. The developer, Lowe Enterprises, plans to take public input on the plan next month.

Lowe Enterprises first announced the development in November. Now, some details are emerging. A conceptual plan includes a 60-room hotel and 52 condominiums. Some of those condos could be rented.

Facebook/Habitat for Humanity Roaring Fork Valley

The non profit filling a central building in downtown Basalt wants to open in early April. The local Habitat for Humanity chapter will open a Restore in the former Clark’s Market space that’s empty. 

The agreement between the building’s owner and Habitat for Humanity marks a transition for downtown. Businesses there have struggled to get business. This latest announcement may bring in some vitality.

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