Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Schools in the Roaring Fork Valley get graded- some of the best and the worst in the state are here.

Basalt has its first menorah lighting to celebrate the beginning of Hannukah.

Aspen’s new Airport Director takes the helm as County Commissioners decide how to widen the airfield.

New owners at Krabloonik aim for a kinder, friendlier era and they are receiving a “thumbs up”, so far, from a group whose aim is to make sure the sled dogs are well cared for.

Marci Krivonen

A plan to reconfigure the airfield at the Aspen Airport cleared its latest hurdle on Tuesday. The Board of Pitkin County Commissioners gave initial approval to an “Airport Layout Plan.” Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The County will send the preferred plan to the Federal Aviation Administration, which is requiring the airport to make safety improvements. Most of the commercial aircraft that serve the airport are being phased out and their replacements have longer wingspans. So modifications, like a wider runway are needed.

Creative Commons/Brad Flickinger

The Aspen Community School is one of the top-ranked schools in the state, according to a new analysis. The school near Woody Creek, ranked six out of 500 middle schools.

The organization Colorado School Grades releases its report card annually. Nearly 2000 public schools are ranked. The group uses data from the Colorado Department of Education and a formula that looks at academic achievement, academic growth and gaps in education.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Conservation groups are cheering an oil and gas plan that closes much of the Thompson Divide to future drilling.

Controversial changes like square footage and building height could be left out of new regulations for lodges in Aspen.

And, food scraps are being composted at some high-end Aspen hotels.

A statewide water plan is unveiled in Denver. And, the state capitol is getting a major upgrade.

White River National Forest

The White River National Forest released a “conservation-minded” plan Tuesday for future oil and gas drilling. Conservation groups are cheering the plan, saying it proposes closing nearly all of the Thompson Divide to future leasing. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

aspenpitkin.com

The landfill in Pitkin County is nearing the end of its life and one new program may keep it open longer. Organizers of what’s called the SCRAPS program are working with individuals and restaurants to compost food waste. It’s estimated 30 percent of the County’s compacted trash stream is food waste that could be composted. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Aspen City Council decides to take up lodging incentives again-- but much more cautiously.

Garfield County Commissioners suggest alternate routes for energy companies to reach leases on the contested Thompson Divide.

And the Glenwood Springs Police Department aims to crack down on people who don’t lock up their trash from bears.

The USA Pro Challenge announces Aspen will be included again in its route for 2015, only this time it won’t be the start.

Marci Krivonen

A Basalt-based conservation group is putting some science behind water problems on the Crystal River. A drought in 2012 made clear the need to improve the river’s health, when stream flows dropped to a trickle. 

The problem with the Crystal River that runs through Redstone and Carbondale, is sometimes there’s not enough water and too much dirt. Heavy sedimentation can smother fish and aquatic insects. In 2012, American Rivers named the river one of the most endangered in the country.

The Roaring Fork Conservancy wants to do more than just raise awareness, so it created a management plan. Right now, the group’s gathering data about the riverbed. Heather Tattersall is with the Conservancy.

"So (we’re) making a computerized model of what the Crystal River looks like, as far as where there are pools, where it’s flat, where it’s deep. So we’ll be able to take that model of the river and say, ‘Ok, if we add this much water to it, how much fish habitat do we create? If we take water away from it, where does it get hurt?’"

Once the modeling is complete, the Conservancy may take steps like restoring the river bank or narrowing a river channel.

aspensnowmass.com

One of the ways the Aspen Skiing Company says it sets itself apart from its competitors is through its arts program. Since 2005, the Company has been collaborating with the Aspen Art Museum for a program called “Art in Unexpected Places.” Part of the program features artwork on lift tickets. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen jumped aboard the Silver Queen Gondola on Aspen Mountain to talk with Ski Co. CEO Mike Kaplan.

    

Professional snow sports athletes have started their competitive season and many are traveling from race to race. For most, the cost of competing can be as challenging as defeating their opponents. Nordic ski racer Noah Hoffman and Nordic Combined athlete Michael Ward talked about the expense during a recent visit to Aspen Public Radio. They were preparing for a fundraiser in Aspen and spoke with Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen.

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