Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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Creative Commons/Medical, Surgical Operative Photography

The V.A. medical center in Grand Junction that cares for patients in the Roaring Fork Valley, is stopping certain surgeries. The move comes after an abnormal number of “unwanted surgical complications.”

Facebook/GrassRoots TV

The two candidates squaring off for a seat on Aspen city council think change needs to happen in the city department that handles development proposals. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more from Thursday night’s “Squirm Night” forum.

The City’s community development department is made up of more than two dozen staffers. It handles construction plans and ensures developments comply with the city’s building code. It also enforces the land use code.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen’s second lifeline to the world is up and running again, as Independence Pass reopens.

A judge dismisses a case against an elderly Carbondale driver who killed a Basalt motorcyclist.

Two Aspen City Council candidates carefully duke it out on the Aspen Public Radio airwaves.

Turns out, you cannot buy exclusive access to your condo building, especially if you share the building with affordable housing residents.

Childcare in the Roaring Fork Valley is getting harder to find.

Creative Commons/Flickr/TheBoyFromFindlay

The Garfield County Commissioners are working to send a powerful message that they’re against new transmountain diversions. 

The commissioners are organizing a meeting of Western Slope elected leaders to draw up a unified message ahead of the completion of Governor Hickenlooper’s statewide water plan. Garfield County Commissioner Tom Jankovsky:

Creative Commons/Flickr/Oregon Dept. of Transportation

Pitkin county staff will explore using rooftops and other government property to install solar panels. County commissioners this week approved a funding request for a feasibility study. 

The county will spend between $15,000 and $25,000 to locate beneficial sites for solar and find out how much electricity could be generated. Right now, the county consumes 1.3 megawatt hours per year and it’s not offset by any significant renewable efforts. County Engineer G.R. Fielding says now is a good time to pursue solar.

Marci Krivonen

In the Midvalley, it’s not uncommon for parents to add their child’s name to a waitlist at a childcare center long before the baby’s born. Michelle Oger directs Blue Lake Preschool.

“Several moms calls us once they find out that they’re expecting, to get on the waitlist even before they tell their spouse or extended family. They ask that we keep it a secret until they announce it to everybody else.” 

Allison Johnson

Two schools in the Midvalley are welcoming new school administrators. The Roaring Fork School District announced new principals at Basalt High School and Crystal River Elementary School in Carbondale. 

Matthew Koenigsknecht will lead Crystal River Elementary School. He was a language arts teacher in Denver and managed a summer program at Basalt Elementary School.

Peter Mueller will take the reigns at Basalt High School. He works for The Nature Conservancy and served as principal at Telluride public schools. Mueller also worked in Evergreen, Colorado at a private school.

Kathleen Tadvick/Colorado Parks and Wildlife

There’s a debate happening about how to manage a chicken-like bird that calls part of Garfield County home. Last week county commissioners submitted a 1000 page package to the Bureau of Land Management. The agency’s drawing up a plan for how to protect the greater sage grouse whose population is shrinking. County officials fear protection could mean strict regulations for the oil and gas industry.

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County is taking public comments on a draft plan for managing the North Star Nature Preserve, east of Aspen. On Monday night, an open house will be held, where people can learn more about the wetlands and meadows. 

You drive by the North Star Nature Preserve on your way toward Independence Pass from Aspen. It’s a 285-acre open space parcel with deer, elk, black bears and the one of the highest elevation Great Blue Heron rookeries in the state.

codot.gov

The Colorado Department of Transportation is planning to open Independence Pass to vehicle traffic this week. The winter gates are scheduled to open Thursday.

Crews start in April, clearing the high mountain pass of snow and debris. One of the last steps is avalanche mitigation, where officials from the Colorado Avalanche Information Center set off slides, then road crews clear away the snow. The avalanche work was done Thursday. CDOT spokesperson Tracy Trulove is confident the road will open on time.

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