Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Facebook/Rachel Richards

In June the Pitkin County Commissioners sent a resolution to Colorado’s congressional delegation, decrying a national effort to transfer federal lands to state ownership. Advocates say it would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and BLM. Commissioner Rachel Richards told Marci Krivonen the effort would spell trouble for Pitkin County.

Rachel Richards is a Pitkin County Commissioner. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. In future weeks, we’ll air the other side of the argument.

Concerns about how Aspen is developing prompted a city councilman Monday to ask for an analysis of development projects already approved. 

Aspen resident Ward Hauenstein told council Monday he’s worried.

"City government has had the vision and courage to limit growth. I fear that our representatives have lost that vision and courage."

Creative Commons/Flickr/Medill DC

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain spoke in Aspen Saturday. The republican discussed the Iran deal, cyber attacks, Donald Trump and ISIS. 

McCain’s talk was part of the Aspen Security Forum. In fighting the Islamic terror group ISIS, he says the U.S. has no direct strategy.

Aspen Valley Foundation

A failed effort to develop a retirement community in Basalt is disappointing but not surprising to officials involved. 

Tom Griffiths, with the now defunct Aspen Valley Foundation, knew 19 months ago seeing the project through was a long shot. The foundation had lost its CEO and Griffiths began meeting with local governments, hospitals and banks. He wanted someone to take over the $105 million project.

Marci Krivonen

To make way for a new home in Aspen’s west end neighborhood, the property owner recently cut down several trees. That kind of removal must pass muster with the City of Aspen, which considers the trees in town a “community forest.” Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with city forester Ben Carlsen about when removing a tree is permitted.

Ben Carlsen is the City of Aspen Forester. He says the tree mitigation costs for the home on Aspen Street reached nearly $40,000.

Marci Krivonen

The $7.5 million dollar sale of Aspen’s Smuggler Mine Friday marks another chapter for a piece of land rich with history. The limited liability company Aspen Green Mountain purchased the 29-acre parcel from a group of friends whose connection with Smuggler includes heartache and hard work. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dana Knight loads a trailer on a cloudy, rainy day. The now former owner of the Smuggler Mine property ran an auto repair shop on it for years, not far from the mine’s entrance.

Andrea J Holland

A wildfire caused by lightning near Glenwood Springs cost between $80,000 and $100,000 to fight. It’s now fully controlled.

The Red Canyon Fire started Friday afternoon in dry juniper, pinyon and sagebrush. It burned seven acres on BLM land about three miles southeast of Glenwood. David Boyd with the BLM says two helicopters and between 50 and 60 firefighters worked it.

"When you have a fire this close to the community, you want to keep it small. One reason it stayed small was because we had so many people who could respond to it."

Facebook/Mountain Rescue Aspen

Mountain Rescue Aspen was involved in the recovery of two bodies from the Maroon Bells Snowmass wilderness last week. It’s still unclear how father and son Jeffrey and Cameron Beard died. A hiker discovered the Colorado Springs residents unresponsive, in their tent. Law enforcement initially thought lightning was the cause. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Jeff Edelson and Doug Paley from Mountain Rescue. Edelson says Colorado is third for lightning deaths in the U.S.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Ed Schipul

A new study in Aspen and Snowmass Village will attempt to quantify just how large the “vacation rental by owner” sector is. 

More visitors to Aspen and Snowmass are using websites like Airbnb and VRBO to book overnight stays. It’s unknown, though, how big this sector is compared to traditional hotels and lodges. The tourism agencies Stay Aspen Snowmass and Destimetrics are trying to find out. Bill Tomcich is with Stay Aspen Snowmass.

Good afternoon, it's Mountain Edition.

Emergency crews recover two bodies from a tent in the Maroon Bells Snowmass wilderness. Lightning may be to blame.

After too many bear-human conflicts, the Forest Service mandates bear-resistant containers for backpackers.

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