Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Warm temperatures are boosting river levels and disappointing skiers. We’ll tell you what’s ahead in the forecast.

Low oil and gas prices are good for consumers but tough on companies drilling in Western Colorado.

Despite an oil and gas slowdown, a new analysis shows hundreds of spills are still being reported.

Aspen residents are gathering signatures to get a measure on the ballot that would require voter-approval of some development projects.

Marci Krivonen

The new owners of Aspen’s Explore Booksellers say they bought the property and business because they want to promote new ideas. They also have a history of visiting Aspen and the book store. The $5 million sale closed earlier this month.

The new buyer is a group of investors connected to the Public Interest Network. The Network trains activists and supports non profits. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Wendy Wendlandt, a spokesperson for the group of buyers.

Marci Krivonen

The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency told a small crowd in Aspen Thursday that action on climate change is needed now. Administrator Gina McCarthy timed her visit with the Winter X Games, to reach a younger crowd.

McCarthy’s visit was in conjunction with Protect Our Winters, a climate change advocacy group led by snow sports athletes. Standing next to the ski gondola, McCarthy emphasized how action on climate change is critical to economies like Aspen’s.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The Winter X Games are once again in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley.

Officials try to shed light on a lack of childcare in our region.

A major landowner in Aspen is asking elected leaders for an extension for one of his development proposals.

Aspen’s Police Chief reports back from a statewide conference about pot and public safety

And a troubled Carbondale elementary school will need a new principal next year.

Officials in Garfield County get an update on an oil and gas study.

And doctors in Glenwood Springs are lending a hand with radon testing.

Aspen’s mayor heads to Washington.

And we stop by a long running nordic ski area in the Mid Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Nicholas Wang

More families in the Roaring Fork Valley need access to affordable early childhood education. That was the message from a panel discussion in Aspen Tuesday. Aspen’s mayor joined four others from the non profit and business sectors on stage at the Wheeler. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

This winter marks the 29th year skiers have been gliding down trails at Spring Gulch ski area, near Carbondale. The cross-country center is gaining popularity despite its isolated location. It’s tucked in gambel oak and aspen forests six miles west of town. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the operators are working to keep up with demand.

Carbondale resident Amanda Leahy is using her ski pole to shake loose snow from her boot. She’s on her lunch break.

5pointfilm.org/Mending The Line

Carbondale’s Five Point Film Festival is in Aspen this weekend. The non profit will screen 9 short films at the Wheeler Opera House on Saturday. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to one of the film’s main characters. Oregon-based Frank Moore is a WWII veteran and avid fly fisherman.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Aspen’s City Council decides to join the statewide switch to mail-in ballots, while City officials continue to review a handful of proposed hotels.

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority tries to make sure commuters have enough parking.

And Gay Ski Week kicks off in the Upper Valley with a mission to fundraise.

Residents in a Rifle mobile home park report diesel in their water.

Basalt police continue the search for a robbery suspect.

Gina Von Hoof/matthewshepard.org

Gay Ski Week is well underway in Aspen. The annual event features skiing, parties, comedy and film but it’s not just about fun. There’s an underlying emphasis on advocating for LGBTQ causes.

The non-profit that runs Gay Ski Week, Aspen Out, raises money for groups like the Matthew Shepard Foundation. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with Robin Wood-Mason, Deputy Director of the Foundation and Kevin McManamon, President of Aspen Out.

Basalt Police

Basalt Police continue to look for a suspect who robbed a liquor store with a knife Friday night. This week they released photographs. 

Just before 10 o’clock Friday night, a man robbed Jimbo’s Wine and Liquor downtown. Police report the man took out a knife and told a store employee to open the cash register. He got away with close to $1400.

On Monday the department released three images captured on a surveillance camera at Jimbo’s. Greg Knott is Chief of Police.

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