Marci Krivonen


Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways to Connect

The look of the forests in the Roaring Fork Valley may be dramatically different in the future. High elevation forests could be replaced with lower growing species like aspens. A new website shows how forests in the American West will look different under climate change. The local nonprofit Aspen Center for Environmental Studies worked with scientists to develop the site.

Jamie Werner is Forest Program Director at ACES. Her laptop’s propped open and she’s clicking around the site,

"So here we have Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands…”


There are avalanches being reported in the high country already. On Saturday, a skier triggered a large slide on a mountain near Gothic. Forecasters from the Colorado Avalanche Information Center say the activity is due to new and wind-drifted snow gathering on old, weak layers from storms in October. Brian Lazar is with the Center.

Brian Lazar is the Deputy Director of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Parker Knight

About one in ten kids in Pitkin County are living in poverty. That’s according to a statewide study discussed in Aspen last week. Officials with the Colorado Children’s Campaign visited with parents, elected leaders and child care workers about their latest findings. Shirley Ritter is a child advocate who runs Kids First — an Aspen center subsidized by taxpayers. She spoke with Marci Krivonen.

Shirley Ritter directs Kids First for the city of Aspen. 

Marci Krivonen

With the legislative session about two months away, State Senator Kerry Donovan is preparing her legislative agenda. She represents Pitkin, Eagle and other Western Slope counties. This session, she says finding ways to provide internet in rural areas will be a top priority. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Voters in Aspen this week turned down a new lodge proposed on Main Street. Now, the developer is moving forward with an alternative.

With fresh snow, mountain roads are closing and buses are getting outfitted for skis.

Western Slope officials are making their message clear about the statewide water plan.

And, a proposed development in El Jebel has officers realizing there isn’t enough law enforcement in the area.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Pictures of Money

Perhaps not surprisingly, the City of Aspen’s economy was driven by marijuana, booze and construction sales in September. 

Those categories were the drivers of a 15 percent increase in overall retail sales compared to the same month in 2014, according to a city report. Sales of sports equipment and clothing also saw a jump. One category did see a decline in September: miscellaneous sales. That includes sectors like health/beauty and banks/finance.

Facebook/Aspen's Community Center

Now that the electorate narrowly approved using Aspen City Hall for “community use” in the future, a group is moving forward with plans to return the building to its roots. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

The developer behind a proposed lodge on Main Street in Aspen, said Tuesday he wouldn’t be surprised if voters turned down Base 2. And, that’s exactly what they did. The issue — called Question 2A on the ballot — was polarizing, with many saying the lodge was a step toward progression. Others said it broke city rules and didn’t fit in. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with developer Mark Hunt before the results were released late Tuesday night.

Marci Krivonen

Voter turnout improved on election day Tuesday (11/3) in Pitkin County. More than 5600 people turned in ballots. That's more than the last odd-year election, which yielded 4800 votes.

A majority of voters decided against Base 2 Lodge. It was the most controversial measure on the ballot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

The “no” vote won easily, even though the “pro” campaign had more money. Preliminary results show 62 percent of voters decided against building Base 2 lodge on the corner of Monarch and Main streets. 37 percent voted in favor of it.

Marci Krivonen / Aspen Public Radio

Results are starting to come in on local, regional and state issues. Voters approved Proposition BB, choosing to allow the state to keep 66 million dollars in revenue from marijuana sales.