Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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APR Local News
4:37 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Aspen Remembers Firefighters Who Died In Sept. 11 Attacks

More than 100 people gathered for a somber 9/11 ceremony in downtown Aspen. The event is meant to recognize the 343 firefighters who died at the World Trade Center.
Credit Marci Krivonen

Firefighters in Aspen today marked the 13th anniversary of 9-11 with a somber ceremony. The event not only recognized the World Trade Center attacks, but also touched on President Obama’s recent efforts to root out Islamic State extremists. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The mood was reflective and somber as local firefighters lined up outside the Aspen firehouse just after noon. A large American Flag waved high overhead as a group of more than 100 people gathered. A bell rang to remember the 343 firefighters who lost their lives at the World Trade Center.

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Mountain Edition
3:41 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Mountain Edition - September 11th, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

So far it looks like the Roaring Fork Valley is holding off a nasty virus that’s raising concerns in Denver. 

Bears are causing some problems, we hear what police in Basalt are doing about it.

One of the visible leftover structures from the recession in the Upper Valley may disappear later this year.

And more people are showing interest in farming Pitkin county open space land.

Climate change reports are frequent-- we check on one about water in the Valley.

We’ll get the details on how Aspen’s airport could get quieter and say “goodbye” to long time airport director Jim Elwood.

APR Local News
10:39 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Aspen Non Profit Sees Jump In Domestic Violence Reporting

The non profit advocacy group RESPONSE has seen growth in the number of cases it handles. Domestic violence is in the national spotlight due to the Ray Rice case.
Credit responsehelps.org

The problem of domestic violence is being talked about nationally after footage of abuse by an NFL player went public earlier this week. And,  the National Domestic Violence Hotline reportedly has seen a spike in calls.

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APR Local News
6:00 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Developers Prep For Construction On Long-Stalled Aspen Building

Construction on the Dancing Bear's "Mountainside" building stalled during the recession. Now, a new development group wants to restart construction later this year.
Credit Marci Krivonen

A multi-story building in Aspen that’s been unfinished since the recession could see construction work this Fall. Developers of the Dancing Bear’s “Mountainside” building want to open the luxury residence club by the end of 2015. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Randall Bone is CEO of Sunrise Company, the development group behind the two Dancing Bear buildings. Today he’s taking a small group on a tour of the “Parkside” residence club in downtown Aspen.

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APR Local News
6:00 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Interest Grows In Pitkin County Agricultural Program

A tractor moves through a 10-acre plot near Basalt, digging up potatoes. This parcel is one of several managed by Pitkin County but leased to private agricultural producers.
Credit Marci Krivonen

Interest is growing in farming Pitkin County’s agricultural lands. The county manages about 250 acres that are either already leased or will become available to agricultural producers later this year. The land is desirable because it’s cheap. Often the cost of farming and ranching in Pitkin County keeps would-be agricultural producers from jumping into the industry. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

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