Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County is fighting a national effort to transfer federal public lands to states. The county plans to send a resolution to congressional representatives in Washington DC. 

One group advocating for state control of federal public lands is the American Lands Council. It argues state control would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.

Facebook/Protegete:Nuestro Aire, Nuestra Salud

The number of ethnic minorities involved in environmental organizations across the country is dismally low and it’s the same in the Roaring Fork Valley. Some statewide groups have noticed the problem and are creating programs for the Latino community. They say reaching this population is an important step toward reducing carbon emissions. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dulce Saenz immigrated with her family to Colorado from Mexico when she was a toddler. She says she heard the term “carbon footprint” for the first time last year.

Marci Krivonen

In Aspen’s busy summer season, about 1500 vehicles move through downtown intersections each day. To make streets safer, city council made it a priority, creating the “Rethink the Streets” program. It includes a temporary project at the corner of Galena and Hopkins. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen met City Engineer Trish Aragon there. Here's their interview:

Trish Aragon is City Engineer in Aspen. The city is holding an ice cream chat to take feedback on the downtown street project Wednesday afternoon, starting at 4 pm outside of city hall.

Facebook/Jerry Young

The man who died after he fell out of his kayak on the Fryingpan River, was a part-time ski instructor for the Aspen Skiing Company. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, Jerry Young was 63 years old.

It’s unclear where Young fell from his blue inflatable kayak but, he and a friend began their float at Seven Castles, just outside of downtown Basalt. Britt Queer and his girlfriend were on a restaurant patio along the Fryingpan when they saw the empty kayak and Young’s body.

Cornelia Carpenter

Bugs and wildlife are benefiting from higher-than-normal rivers in the Roaring Fork watershed. Heavy rain and snowmelt have boosted flows to flood stage in some areas. It’s positive for the river ecosystem.

River flows are above average on the Roaring Fork, Frying Pan, Crystal and Colorado rivers. It’s good news for water quality and wildlife habitat along the riverbanks. The flows knock away dirt buildup in the spaces between rocks on the riverbed. Rick Lafaro with the Roaring Fork Conservancy says that’s where bugs live.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Carolyn Cuskey

Rescuers were unsuccessful Sunday (6/21) in reviving a man who fell out of a kayak on the fast-flowing Fryingpan River. 

The man and a friend began floating the river at Seven Castles, about five miles from downtown Basalt. The friend called 911 around 3:30 in the afternoon after the two became separated. Officials with the Basalt Fire Department say witnesses at a riverside restaurant in Basalt saw the unoccupied boat and the man’s body. A group of bystanders downstream pulled him from the river and worked to resuscitate him. The efforts continued when emergency crews arrived, but the man was pronounced dead on-scene. An official with Basalt Fire says flows on the Fryingpan were extremely high. The man was from Grand Junction.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Carolyn Cuskey

Water releases from Ruedi Reservoir are increasing flood danger along the Frying Pan River into Basalt. Law enforcement is warning homeowners and anglers who fish the popular river. 

Areas of greatest concern in Basalt include homes along River Cove, Swinging Bridge Lane, River Oaks Lane, and in the Roaring Fork Mobile Home Park. Police are also concerned about the area near 7-Eleven and the Basalt Avenue pedestrian bridge that’s a popular play spot for kids.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Snowmelt combined with recent rains have boosted rivers to dangerous levels.

It takes a lot to get Aspen ready for the Food and Wine Classic. We’ll hear about the final preparations.

And, the publisher of Food and Wine magazine says Aspen’s fest is different from others held around the country.

A conservation group is concerned about a proposed oil and gas lease swap in the Thompson Divide.

And, a local non profits helps low income homeowners become energy efficient.

EcoFlight

A conservation group aired concerns with Washington lawmakers this month over a deal that would remove oil and gas leases from the Thompson Divide near Carbondale. The Paonia-based Citizens for a Healthy Community fears the proposal will move energy development to their backyard. 

Paonia’s mayor, a Hotchkiss farmer and the local chamber of commerce president joined Jim Ramey in Washington. Ramey’s the director of Citizens for a Healthy Community.

Facebook/Pitkin Co. Open Space and Trails

Heavy rain Tuesday night boosted the Roaring Fork River in Aspen to flood stage. Minor flooding is possible in low-lying areas. 

Flows in the Aspen stretch of the Roaring Fork were nearly four times the typical amount Wednesday morning. Pitkin County Sheriff Joe Disalvo says people with homes in a floodplain should be prepared to sandbag and self-rescue if waters get too high.

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