Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

aspenpitkin.com

Last year the Aspen Police Department saw its highest number of calls for service in a decade. The department recently released its crime statistics for 2014. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Police Chief Richard Pryor.

To view the full list of crime statistics for 2014, click here.

Creative Commons/401kcalculator.org

The candidates running in Aspen’s spring election are already raising thousands of dollars in the race for elected office. The first of three campaign finance reports was filed Tuesday.

Facebook/Tom McCabe

Aspen City Council candidate Tom McCabe is the former director of Aspen’s affordable housing department. He’s running for city council and opposes Referendum One. He served on council before in the early 2000s. He told Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen his perspective is unique.

Bert Myrin

Our series profiling the candidates running for Aspen city council continues with a look at Bert Myrin. He’s the driving force behind Referendum One on the spring ballot, which seeks to bring potential developments to a public vote. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Myrin grew up in the Roaring Fork Valley, graduating from high school in Carbondale in the 1980s. After moving away to attend law school, he returned to Aspen.

 

Aspen city council candidate Andy Israel is probably best known for his blog Aspen Spin. Now he’s expanding his horizons by entering the race to fill one of two open council seats. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Israel moved to Aspen 12 years ago after working on Wall Street. He began writing a blog about the glitz and glamour that drew him to town. The tagline of aspenspin.com is “ski everyday and party every night.”

 

Roger Adams

Adam Frisch is the only incumbent in the race for two open seats on Aspen city council. He’s also one of two candidates who don’t support “referendum one” - the ballot question about development. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Frisch is a father and businessman who’s proud of his record on city council. He says he’s not done with government. He’d like to move forward issues he’s been working on.

Roger Adams

Former Aspen Mayor Mick Ireland is in familiar territory. He’s out campaigning for office like he’s done several times before. This time, Ireland is hoping to fill one of two open seats on city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Ireland served as a Pitkin County Commissioner for 13 years and mayor for six. He grew up in a family of public servants, he says.

Marci Krivonen

We continue our series profiling the candidates running for Aspen City Council. Seven people are vying for two open seats. Candidate Marcia Goshorn is frustrated with city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains why.

Goshorn has lived in Aspen for nearly four decades. She first visited in 1960. Now she runs a property management company and keeps a close eye on city hall. She says council isn’t listening to citizens.

If you’re a Glenwood Springs resident, you still have time to vote. Though, city officials say mailing the ballot is no longer an option. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Ballots in the all-mail ballot election will be counted Tuesday. To make your ballot count, you must drop it off instead of sticking it in the mail. Ann Green is deputy city clerk.

“They must drop off their ballot either at the county courthouse east door, or here at City Hall. There’s a box in front of municipal court.”

Facebook/Keith Goode

 

Next week ballots go in the mail for Aspen’s municipal election. Voters will choose from a large pool of candidates to fill two open seats on city council. Keith Goode is one of seven people running. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

"Reporter: Why are you running for city council?"

 

Goode: "I’ve been on the Planning and Zoning Board for the last four years and I really have enjoyed my time there. But, the main reason is when I hear people say ‘Aspen’s losing its character,’ I don’t buy that."

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