Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Marci Krivonen

Many immigrants in the Roaring Fork Valley are impacted by a court battle being waged at the federal level. A ruling from a Texas judge this week forced the Obama administration to halt executive actions on immigration. They would have provided legal protection and work permits.

Aspen Whitewater Rafting

The expected designation of Browns Canyon as a National Monument will have an impact in the Roaring Fork Valley. Tomorrow President Obama plans to give added protections to 22,000 acres near Salida.

The local impact centers around whitewater rafting. The area’s known for its rapids and some commercial companies in the Aspen area offer trips to Browns Canyon. Jim Ingram owns Aspen Whitewater Rafting. He says the Browns Canyon trip is one of the company’s best offerings. He’s happy to see the area protected.

Marci Krivonen

Mardi Gras celebrations across the world yesterday had revelers imbibing before the fasting Lent season. In Snowmass Village, hundreds gathered on the mall for annual traditions like a “bead toss” and a parade. The event may not rise to the level of New Orleans frenzy, but there’s no denying it’s a party.

It’s 3 o’clock in the afternoon on a Tuesday and these town government staffers aren’t at their desks. Instead, they’re tossing beads to a crowd below.

The tradition is 33 years old and is put on by the Snowmass Tourism Office.

writermarkstevens.com

 

Colorado writer Mark Stevens has written three murder mystery novels that are set in the Flattops Wilderness near Glenwood Springs. His latest book, Trapline, was released in November. He was signing books at Explore Booksellers in Aspen on Saturday. Stevens, who lives in Denver, explained to Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen why he chose the Flattops as the backdrop for his books.

Mark Stevens is the author of Trapline, a murder mystery novel set in the Flattops Wilderness near Glenwood Springs. Stevens’ fourth book comes out in September.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Once again, Aspen will play host to the First Lady. Michelle Obama is expected to be in town this weekend.

An Aspen teenager arrested and taken down by police officers gets an attorney. Police suspect the teen had marijuana.

Aspen City Council supports an affordable housing project from a prolific landowner. But, a tree nearly derails the approval.

The new Airport Director in Aspen talks about plans to improve the experience of flying into the Upper Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Wonderlane

If you’re an adult with Medicaid in the Roaring Fork Valley, there’s only one clinic that will accept your health insurance. This lack of access is a problem as the number of Medicaid patients increase under the Affordable Care Act. Colorado expanded Medicaid a year ago and in Pitkin County alone, the number of people using Medicaid nearly tripled. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

High Country News

The changes the White River National Forest is considering to minimize crowds in wilderness areas have been successful in other forests. Last week, Forest Service officials began an informal outreach effort around how to bring back solitude to busy trails and backcountry camping. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, their ideas have been tried in other wilderness areas.

Aspen Sopris District Ranger Karen Schroyer is delivering a presentation to a packed house in Aspen. She’s working to educate people about problems in the forest and solicit feedback.

West Slope Back On Drought Index

In the dry month of January, snowpack levels in nearly every river basin in Colorado declined. In the Roaring Fork Valley, not only did the amount of snow diminish but drought conditions returned. 

The U.S. Drought Monitor released Thursday puts the Western Slope in the “abnormally dry” category, including the majority of Eagle and Pitkin Counties and all of Garfield County. “Abnormally dry” is the least severe of five categories.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

With a measles outbreak in several states, more parents in Pitkin County are getting their kids vaccinated.

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority will consider making it easier to comment on a controversial access plan.

The starting bell rings for candidates and ballot measures in Aspen’s May Election.

Snowmass Village starts reviewing proposed changes for Base Village.

We tally up just how recreational pot shops are in the Roaring Fork Valley after a year of legal retail marijuana.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Philippa Willitts

An Aspen charity focused on reducing the number of suicides in our region is expanding its reach. The Aspen Hope Center is holding a support group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and questioning teenagers. According to its organizers, the group, called I am Me is the first of its kind in the Valley. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Hope Center Executive Director Michelle Muething realized LGBTQ teenagers needed support after several came to the organization for help.

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