Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

If you’re a Glenwood Springs resident, you still have time to vote. Though, city officials say mailing the ballot is no longer an option. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Ballots in the all-mail ballot election will be counted Tuesday. To make your ballot count, you must drop it off instead of sticking it in the mail. Ann Green is deputy city clerk.

“They must drop off their ballot either at the county courthouse east door, or here at City Hall. There’s a box in front of municipal court.”

Facebook/Keith Goode

 

Next week ballots go in the mail for Aspen’s municipal election. Voters will choose from a large pool of candidates to fill two open seats on city council. Keith Goode is one of seven people running. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

"Reporter: Why are you running for city council?"

 

Goode: "I’ve been on the Planning and Zoning Board for the last four years and I really have enjoyed my time there. But, the main reason is when I hear people say ‘Aspen’s losing its character,’ I don’t buy that."

Marci Krivonen

The head of of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs was in Snowmass Village Thursday. Secretary Robert McDonald visited vets at the National Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Flanked by his handlers, V.A. Secretary Robert McDonald makes his way toward the Snowmass ski area where veterans are preparing to ski. He stops to speak with David Williams from Florida.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

The top official for the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs visits disabled vets in Snowmass.

The former owner of an embattled dog sledding operation appears in court.

And, it’s fire season in Colorado. Local firefighters are preparing at specific locations.

Potholes are forming on local streets. We’ll tell you why the deep caverns are particularly pronounced in the high country.

State lawmakers spend nine hours debating the budget.

Marci Krivonen

Students at Aspen High School are ringing a bell in the school commons quite often this spring. The ringing signals the next step in the student’s journey toward college. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the tradition was started by college counselor Kathy Klug.

This is the week students begin to hear from the schools they applied to, according to college counselor Kathy Klug. When it’s good news, the students ring the silver bell near Klug’s office.

Marci Krivonen

It’s that time of year...when the weather’s freeze-thaw pattern causes deep caverns to form on city streets and state highways. Potholes are ubiquitous almost everywhere but in the high country, the weather’s more extreme so the roads are ripe for ripping open. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s the morning rush hour on West Main Street in Aspen. Buses, cars and construction vehicles stream into town.

Reporter: "So this is the problem area?"

Marci Krivonen

After a dry start to the year, the month of March brought much needed moisture to the Aspen region. 

Ruedi Water and Power Authority

An effort is underway to get people to conserve water across the Roaring Fork Valley. On Tuesday a public meeting will be held in El Jebel on the Regional Water Efficiency Plan.

For more than a year, major water suppliers in the Valley like the Cities of Aspen and Glenwood Springs, have been creating their own water efficiency plans. Those plans make up a larger effort. It lays out ways to use less water.

Marci Krivonen

Hundreds of disabled veterans are in Snowmass Village this week for the National Disabled Veterans Sports Clinic. The vets arrived in droves over the weekend at the Aspen airport. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Crystal Hughes stands on the tarmac at the Aspen airport. She’s wearing military fatigues.

Creative Commons/Flickr/photosteve101

Residents frustrated with slow internet speeds in Old Snowmass showed up to a Pitkin County Commissioner’s meeting Wednesday. 

Katie Murch is co-director at the Aspen Camp of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Old Snowmass. Through an interpreter, she told commissioners slow internet makes the organization look unprofessional. An online service that video streams her signing barely works.

Intepreter Kyle Larson: "Because of the internet service it’s blurry, it freezes. A one minute conversation can take ten minutes because of the internet service and it looks bad."

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