Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

A Snowmass Town councilman faces a felony charge after allegedly trashing a jail cell.

Aspenites will probably vote on a proposed affordable lodge.

A judge considers whether the Aspen Skiing Company is at fault for a mudslide that damaged a home.

We take a look at diversity in the Roaring Fork Valley arts community.

We also get a tour of an innovative marijuana grow facility in the Valley.

Marci Krivonen

A study is underway in the upper valley (Aspen/Pitkin County) to see what people are tossing in the trash. It’s a dirty job, but the goal is to find ways to get more people to recycle and extend the life of the Pitkin County landfill. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A front loader dumps bags of trash onto a tarp at the Pitkin County landfill. It’s garbage from households and businesses from Carbondale to Aspen.

Nearby a group of ten workers in white safety suits is picking through the trash.

blm.gov

Recreation and oil and gas development in our region are impacted by a new plan released Wednesday (7/8/15) by the Bureau of Land Management. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The Resource Management Plan for the Colorado River Valley Field Office applies to BLM lands in six counties including Garfield, Eagle and Pitkin. It updates a 1984 plan and directs management for the next two decades.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Paul Downey

The Great Recession may be in the rearview mirror, but it left poverty in its wake. Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department reports more people living in poverty. Director of the Department Nan Sundeen says a quarter of residents earn slightly more than federal poverty wages. So, many single adults are making just $23,000 a year. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Nan Sundeen is director of Pitkin County Health and Human Services. Next week, we’ll examine access to health care for the poor.

For decades the Aspen Valley Land Trust has kept open spaces in the Roaring Fork Valley from being developed. Now, the organization’s director is preparing to step down. Martha Cochran sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. She says the work AVLT has done to permanently preserve land is not just critical for views and historic land uses, like ranching, it’s important for wildlife.

Martha Cochran is executive director of Aspen Valley Land Trust. She’s stepping down at the end of the year, but intends to stay in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/David Leo Veksler

The City of Aspen will target homes and neighborhoods in a push to reduce its carbon footprint. The latest inventory of pollutants shows Aspen is falling behind in meeting goals to reduce emissions. 

Since 2004, greenhouse gas emissions in Aspen have dropped by 7.4 percent. Ashley Perl is with the City’s Canary Initiative that tracks this data.

"That’s no small task for our town because we’ve been growing a lot and our economy has grown as well, and we’ve enjoyed a great quality of life while continuing to reduce emissions.”

silverpeakapothecary.com

The marijuana industry in Colorado got some attention at the Aspen Ideas Festival last week. Festival participants toured a grow operation near Basalt and heard from experts about the somewhat bumpy rollout of recreational pot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

There’s a few rules before you take a tour of High Valley Farms near Basalt.

    

Speakers: Goldie Hawn, Michael Eisner

Harman-Eisner Artist in Residence Goldie Hawn joins Michael Eisner over lunch for a discussion about her career and the work she continues to support through the Hawn Foundation, which takes up as its mission the needs of children. Learn how the Foundation uses mindfulness to help young people develop social and emotional intelligence, and, in turn, reduce the distress and distraction within their educations that leads to increased rates of dropout.

Speakers: Jamie P. Merisotis, Joshua Wyner, Gene D. Block, Kevin Cary

The value of a college degree is at an all-time high. At the same time, the price of college is escalating while wages for working-class Americans stagnate. Whose responsibility is it to shoulder the increasing cost of higher education? Can Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and other technology-driven education platforms drive costs down? Should community college be free, as is now the case in Tennessee and Chicago? Hear a dynamic panel of higher-education experts discuss the cost and value of a college education in an era of increasing demand for skilled labor and growing income inequality.

Marci Krivonen

Unlikely bedfellows are aligning on the issue of prison reform. On Thursday (7/2), a former prisoner joined New Jersey Senator Cory Booker and a top executive with Koch Industries for a discussion at the Aspen Ideas Festival on mass incarceration. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Shaka Senghor spent 19 years in prison - 17 of them were in solitary confinement. In solitary, he structured his days like he was on a college campus.

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