KAJX

Marci Krivonen

Contributor

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways to Connect

Creative Commons/Flickr/Pictures of Money

Perhaps not surprisingly, the City of Aspen’s economy was driven by marijuana, booze and construction sales in September. 

Those categories were the drivers of a 15 percent increase in overall retail sales compared to the same month in 2014, according to a city report. Sales of sports equipment and clothing also saw a jump. One category did see a decline in September: miscellaneous sales. That includes sectors like health/beauty and banks/finance.

Facebook/Aspen's Community Center

Now that the electorate narrowly approved using Aspen City Hall for “community use” in the future, a group is moving forward with plans to return the building to its roots. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

The developer behind a proposed lodge on Main Street in Aspen, said Tuesday he wouldn’t be surprised if voters turned down Base 2. And, that’s exactly what they did. The issue — called Question 2A on the ballot — was polarizing, with many saying the lodge was a step toward progression. Others said it broke city rules and didn’t fit in. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with developer Mark Hunt before the results were released late Tuesday night.

Marci Krivonen

Voter turnout improved on election day Tuesday (11/3) in Pitkin County. More than 5600 people turned in ballots. That's more than the last odd-year election, which yielded 4800 votes.

A majority of voters decided against Base 2 Lodge. It was the most controversial measure on the ballot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

The “no” vote won easily, even though the “pro” campaign had more money. Preliminary results show 62 percent of voters decided against building Base 2 lodge on the corner of Monarch and Main streets. 37 percent voted in favor of it.

Marci Krivonen / Aspen Public Radio

Results are starting to come in on local, regional and state issues. Voters approved Proposition BB, choosing to allow the state to keep 66 million dollars in revenue from marijuana sales.

Marci Krivonen / Aspen Public Radio

There was a steady stream of voters flowing into the Aspen Jewish Community Center Tuesday. The Center served as a polling place for Aspen voters. Many voters said Question 2A brought them to the polls. If approved, a new hotel called Base 2 would be built on Main Street.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Denise Cross Photography

Newspapers around Colorado last month published endorsements for issues and candidates that voters will decide on Tuesday (11/3). The editorials explain complex issues and detail the paper's decision to support a certain candidate or ballot measure. But with smaller staffs and more media scrutiny, do the opinions of editorial boards matter as much as they once did? Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explored the issue.

Colorado River Water Conservation District

Ahead of a deadline to finalize the Colorado Water Plan, elected leaders from the Western Slope are emphasizing their opposition to transmountain diversions. The plan aims to find ways to supply water to the state’s growing population. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A local conservation group has launched a fundraising campaign to preserve a piece of land used by the Aspen School District. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the Marble Basecamp is at risk of being sold.

Aspen Journalism

The Aspen Skiing Company is getting a jump on a plan to replace an aging ski lift in case an update is possible before a major competition is held on one of its ski areas. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Marci Krivonen

 

Aspen Valley Hospital is asking voters this fall to continue a property tax that has helped pay operating costs for the past twenty years. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, there’s no formal opposition to Question 5A, but voters are wondering when enough is enough when it comes to medical costs.

 

courtesy rendering

 

In a matter of a month, the issue committee backing Base 2 lodge on the fall ballot has spent nearly $30,000. Election groups filed their final campaign finance reports with the City of Aspen on Tuesday (10/27). 

Citizens for Aspen Alive is working to get people to vote yes on Question 2A. It would allow developer Mark Hunt’s Base 2 lodge to be built on the corner of Monarch and Main streets. Hunt’s the lone contributor to the issue committee, spending $50,000 of his own money on things like mailers, newspaper advertising, t-shirts, pizza and beer.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BeHeardTVlive

A Carbondale nonprofit is getting involved in this week’s Republican presidential debate in Boulder. The True Media Foundation will aim to give youth a voice during tomorrow’s event. 

The Foundation teaches local students to produce media with positive social impact. One of its programs - Be Heard! - is spearheading the GOP effort. It’s sending two mobile production vehicles and a crew to the CU Boulder campus - the site of the debate.

Marci Krivonen

There’s growing momentum around producing local food in the Roaring Fork Valley. The new group Roaring Fork Beginning Farmers and Ranchers sprung up earlier this year. It targets mostly young people and it’s meant to help new farmers with hurdles like expensive land. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Creative Commons/Flickr/David Leo Veksler

By the year 2040, nearly 8 million people will call Colorado home. A new set of data shows the state’s population will grow by 40 percent. 

Rocky Mountain PBS and I-News examined numbers from the Census Bureau and state demographer. They released the data last week.

It shows Garfield County’s population will surpass 100,000 people sometime between 2035 and 2040. The latest population count shows 57,302 people live in the county. Most of the Western Slope, led by Garfield County, will experience strong growth between now and 2040.

Sandra Peirce

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding, teacher housing and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Mary Houchin

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding, teacher housing and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Marci Krivonen

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding, teacher housing and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Marci Krivonen

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Pitkin County

The budget for Pitkin County is getting reviewed ahead of a December deadline for adoption. The $104 million budget reflects upgrades to government buildings.

Each fall the county commissioners review every dollar the local government plans to spend in the coming year. In 2016, ongoing expenses like salaries, health services and public safety are rising by 1.7 percent. But, the overall budget will increase by 8.9 percent. That includes expected costs for a major construction project. Jon Peacock is county manager.

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