Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Marci Krivonen

An Aspen-area farm is taking cues from the “mecca” of sustainable agriculture. Joel Salatin runs the Polyface Farm in Virginia. Many agricultural operations have duplicated his practices, including Aspen TREE at Cozy Point Ranch. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen TREE runs a relatively small farm and ranch in a rural area. But, it doesn’t always sound rural.

Texas Tech University

A renowned climate scientist spoke in Aspen Tuesday about connecting the global challenge of climate change to local response. Katharine Hayhoe spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen about how climate change impacts Aspen and, the controversial White House plan announced Monday to cut carbon emissions.

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Aspen City Council Tuesday agreed not to purchase commercial spaces and affordable housing units in a historic downtown building. 

The City has a “right of first refusal” for units in the ISIS building, where Aspen’s movie theater operates. A buyer has offered $10.4 million for two retail spaces and a pair of affordable housing units, but not the theater. The deal requires keeping the residential units affordable.

When it comes to health, communities in the Midvalley struggle with binge drinking and, just slightly, with obesity. Public health officials are sharing results of a survey with local governments. Jordana Sabella is the Public Health Planner for Pitkin and Western Eagle Counties. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Jordana Sabella is Public Health Planner for Pitkin and Western Eagle Counties. 

Thompson Divide Coalition

The Thompson Divide Coalition hopes a successful negotiation with an energy company in Gunnison will set a precedent closer to home. 

The Coalition is working to keep natural gas drilling out of the Divide, southwest of Carbondale. Three companies have undeveloped leases. The second largest, Gunnison Energy, this week agreed to protect the land surface in the Divide through methods like directional drilling. Zane Kessler is with the Coalition.

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The City of Aspen is looking to plug in an effort to decrease its carbon footprint. 

Last year nineteen percent of Aspen’s greenhouse gas emissions came from vehicles and buses moving, sometimes crawling, through town. Tyler Svitak with the Denver group Clean Cities Coalition did a study. He told city council Tuesday it recommends plug-in electric cars to replace aging city vehicles and...

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Staff at the Aspen Community School in Woody Creek are moving into their renovated campus this week ahead of classes starting next month. The public charter school raised millions to replace its outdated school building and gymnasium. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to Skye Skinner of Compass, which operates the community school.

Skye Skinner is Executive Director of Compass, which operates the Aspen Community School. The school still has plans to build a new music and science building.

Marci Krivonen

A Carbondale-area ranch is seeking advice from one of the foremost experts on animal husbandry. Temple Grandin visited Sustainable Settings July 28th. She spoke with ranchers about animal behavior and consulted on a planned construction project. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A big beige and white dairy cow ambles into the milking room at Sustainable Settings farm and ranch. Herdsman Zopher Sabo is milking Ruby as Temple Grandin looks on.

"She’s nice and relaxed, chewing her cud," says Grandin. "She wouldn’t be doing that if she wasn’t relaxed.”

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In June the Pitkin County Commissioners sent a resolution to Colorado’s congressional delegation, decrying a national effort to transfer federal lands to state ownership. Advocates say it would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and BLM. Commissioner Rachel Richards told Marci Krivonen the effort would spell trouble for Pitkin County.

Rachel Richards is a Pitkin County Commissioner. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. In future weeks, we’ll air the other side of the argument.

Concerns about how Aspen is developing prompted a city councilman Monday to ask for an analysis of development projects already approved. 

Aspen resident Ward Hauenstein told council Monday he’s worried.

"City government has had the vision and courage to limit growth. I fear that our representatives have lost that vision and courage."

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