Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

roaringfork.org

There’s less water from the Roaring Fork River being diverted to the East Slope this spring and it’s increasing flood danger. Over the weekend, law enforcement in Aspen and Basalt monitored high flows. Wetter-than-normal conditions on the East Slope temporarily stopped diversions through the Twin Lakes tunnel. They’ll start up again later this month. Bill Linn is Assistant Police Chief in Aspen.

Marci Krivonen

With deep cuts from Washington in recent years, the White River National Forest is looking to free labor. Volunteers stationed at busy spots like the Maroon Bells scenic area, are becoming increasingly essential to the agency. And with summer arriving, officials are recruiting. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

In ten years the annual operating budget for the White River National Forest has been slashed by $2 million and the agency has reduced employees. Scott Fitzwilliams is Forest Supervisor.

snowmassclub.com

The Snowmass Club has announced it will submit a plan to town council requesting a redevelopment of its 217 acre property in Snowmass Village. The plan includes new residential and employee housing and a re-positioning of a portion of the Club’s land.

If approved, some land would be donated to the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, so the organization can expand their campus and increase parking. Nancy Wilhelms is Executive Director of Anderson Ranch. She says much needed student housing would be added.

Marci Krivonen

All this week volunteers and staff at the Pitkin County Library have been boxing up books and hauling them to a new location. For the next several months, the library will operate out of the former Aspen Art Museum, or old power house. The move allows construction on the library building. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen caught up with head librarian Kathy Chandler mid-move.

aspenk12.net

The Aspen School District is hoping a change to its affordable housing rules will attract and retain more employees. Starting in August, school staff living in district rentals will only be allowed to live there five years. The school’s Employee Transitional Housing Program includes 43 units, mostly in Woody Creek and Snowmass Village.

The goal, says school superintendent John Maloy, is to provide more room for newly hired staff. He says last year, there was just one unit open for 27 new employees.

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County elected leaders are sending a letter to Colorado’s congressional delegation, urging them to support an effort that would preserve the Thompson Divide. One county staffer calls it “the most promising proposal to date.”

Kathleen Tadvick/Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The BLM says a new federal plan for helping a bird in Garfield County is necessary because it aims to protect habitat. The agency, and the Forest Service, announced the new approach last week. The number of greater sage grouse is declining and the idea is to keep the bird off the endangered species list. Marci Krivonen spoke with David Boyd, a public affairs specialist for the BLM in northwest Colorado.

David Boyd works out of the BLM office in Silt. After a review and protest period, the plan will go into effect, probably sometime in July.

Creative Commons/Flickr/US Army Africa

Local veterans in need are utilizing an emergency fund that's new this spring. The Western Slope Veterans Coalition is behind the assistance meant for vets in the Roaring Fork and Eagle valleys. Colonial Dick Merritt is part of the coalition. He says it helps with things like utilities, food, mental health counseling, transportation, employment and housing.

"There are many veterans coming out of military service and housing’s real tight. They have jobs but no place to live, so we’re helping them on a temporary basis to get settled."

Facebook/Aspen Hope Center

The Aspen Hope Center turns five on June 1st. The nonprofit serves those in emotional crisis with most clients either dealing with mental health problems or substance abuse. Last year, the organization made headlines as it worked to tackle the problem of suicide after a cluster of deaths happened in a matter of days. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The organization started in 2010 after a study showed the Roaring Fork Valley needed more mental health services. Aspen resident Joe Disalvo already knew that.

Marci Krivonen

The White River National Forest’s newest visitors center officially opens Tuesday. The Forest Service moved the center from Aspen to Highlands to make visits more convenient for the public, and to save money. 

On Friday visitor information specialist Mateo Sandete was putting finishing touches on interpretive signs. Visitors trickled in over Memorial Day weekend for a soft opening. Sandete says the new location is advantageous given the nearby Maroon Bells.

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