Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

There’s a Red Flag Warning for the lower part of the Roaring Fork Valley. That’s until 8pm  and it comes as much of Colorado is holding its breath - the state’s most devastating fire is burning near Colorado Springs. Hundreds of homes have been destroyed by flames.

A brand new air tanker is part of the firefighting fleet in Colorado Springs.. and a Colorado Senator is trying to beef up forces with repurposed military planes, too.

NPR/Kirk Siegler

A wildfire burning north of Colorado Springs is officially Colorado’s most destructive fire, ever. Law enforcement officials announced this morning the Black Forest fire has burned 360 homes - that’s more than last year’s Waldo Canyon Fire. 15,000 acres have burned and nearly 40,000 people have been evacuated. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa gave credit to firefighters’ hard work.

Kirk Siegler / NPR

Just north of Colorado Springs, a destructive wildfire continues to burn. Reporter Liz Ruskin has been covering the Black Forest Fire, which started on Tuesday afternoon. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with her on Wednesday afternoon from KRCC’s studios, downtown where, she said, evidence of the fire was easy to see.

gailschwartz.com

Senator Gail Schwartz of Snowmass Village is looking back on a productive legislative session about a month after it wrapped up. The democrat introduced 35 bills. Most were successful in a democratically-controlled Statehouse. Her bills ranged from water conservation to making hemp a viable commercial product. I sat down with her to discuss these efforts. We began with House Bill 252, one of the most hotly contested measures this session. The now-law requires 18 rural electric cooperatives from Montrose to Gunnison, increase the amount of renewable sources they use.

National Snow and Ice Data Center

Living in the mountains, it’s easy to see changes in nature, especially in the snow. In recent years, dust from desert areas like Utah, has coated some of the area’s snowpack. Scientists in Boulder say the amount of dust being blown into Colorado and throughout the West, has increased over the last two decades. They measured calcium in rainfall to come up with their findings. Jason Neff is associate professor of geology at CU-Boulder and coauthor of the dust study. He told Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen the escalation of dust emissions is due to several factors.

The Roaring Fork Conservancy

More than 100 people jumped into rafts on Saturday for an annual float down the Roaring Fork River. Only, this float wasn’t just an excuse to cool off on a hot day. It was meant to be a learning experience or a classroom on water. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Alongside the river in Glenwood Springs, volunteers lug a big raft full of people to shore. They’re part of the Roaring Fork Conservancy’s 9th annual River Float. The non profit fills more than a dozen boats with participants and an ambassador who talks about the in’s and out’s of the river. 

Marci Krivonen

Bike-sharing programs may be starting in big urban areas like New York City and Chicago, but they’re also catching on in small towns. The first program in a rural community launched this week, right here in the Roaring Fork Valley. Organizers of Aspen’s We-Cycle program hope tourists and local residents alike, will choose two wheels instead of four to get around the small mountain community. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen has a new mayor-elect.  Steve Skadron will be sworn in next week.  His first order of business will be to replace himself on the city council.

After Skadron is sworn in, Aspen Mayor Mick Ireland becomes citizen Ireland after almost twenty years in public office.

Aspen’s bike sharing program is up and running.  Organizers hope it will become a model for other mountain towns.

A West Slope doctor is indicted on charges related to prescription drugs and money laundering, among other things. He could end up facing life in prison.

Marci Krivonen

How did you arrive in Aspen? Was it the skiing that brought you here, or perhaps the hiking or biking. Maybe a romance prompted the move. Whatever caused your journey, it comes with a story. Many of those stories are highlighted in a new exhibition that opened on June 4th. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Journey Stories is a traveling exhibition that makes a stop in Aspen in June and July.

 Fire season has already started in Colorado with the so-called Blue Bell fire igniting near Denver this week. Closer to home, fire officials are holding meetings in local communities to get people prepared. In an effort to educate people statewide, Colorado State University has unveiled a new website that pinpoints fire risk throughout the state. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports the website allows the user to type in their address to see how susceptible their home is to wildfire. 

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